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34 review for Sweden: The Middle Way

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bob Newman

    use by date=1952 Many years ago, I bought this volume in a college bookstore, thinking it would help me understand more about Sweden, one of those countries that you think you know, but actually don't. That was during the height of the cold war, around the time when Kennedy and Khrushchov faced off over the Cuban missile crisis. So you know I ain't whistlin' Dixie when I say it was some time back. Even then, I assumed, without too much leafing through while standing in the store, that the title r use by date=1952 Many years ago, I bought this volume in a college bookstore, thinking it would help me understand more about Sweden, one of those countries that you think you know, but actually don't. That was during the height of the cold war, around the time when Kennedy and Khrushchov faced off over the Cuban missile crisis. So you know I ain't whistlin' Dixie when I say it was some time back. Even then, I assumed, without too much leafing through while standing in the store, that the title referred to Sweden's socialistic system being a middle way between capitalist America and the communist USSR. Recently, after "a bit of procrastination", I finally took Childs' book off my shelf, finding much to my surprise that he wrote about a middle way between fascism and communism, now both long extinct in Europe. He had written the book in 1936, though I had a later edition. In my edition, things were brought up to date--that is up to 1946 ! Thus, the picture of Swedish society offered here is a little passé. I don't think it would be of much use to anyone now, though SWEDEN: THE MIDDLE WAY was a best seller in its day and had a fair amount of influence on thinking in various countries. Childs writes of the cooperative movement in Sweden----how it started, what it achieved both nationally and internationally, its connection to housing, power generation, state industry and state monopolies, to the king, and even to liquor problems. He uses a lot of statistics and examples drawn from light bulb industries, galosh makers, living arrangements in worker housing colonies, and such. It wouldn't have been a very easy read even in the Thirties of the last century, being aimed at policy makers more than the general reading public. Now, I expect most people might wonder why they bothered. That's why I've given it only two stars. But if you want to know what cheap Bordeaux cost in Sweden back then, the Swedish king's role in the general strike of 1909, and many interesting facts about the Swedish state railway system eighty years ago, this could be the book for you.

  2. 5 out of 5

    George

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mark Schrad

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul Garrett

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mihalis

  6. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tobias Edlund

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christin

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Aronow

  11. 4 out of 5

    Olga Kuchma

  12. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

  13. 4 out of 5

    C

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rowel Leung

  15. 5 out of 5

    Snickerdoodle

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cortney

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mary Paul

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dipanjan Mukherjee

  19. 4 out of 5

    Richard Alvarez

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cezar

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hazel Nussbaum

  24. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Whitmore

  25. 4 out of 5

    Derek Johnson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hany

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christine Ezell

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessica De

  30. 5 out of 5

    Krzysiek (Chris)

  31. 4 out of 5

    Cody

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Smithburg

  33. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

  34. 5 out of 5

    Donna

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