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By the time she heads out the front door, the modern woman has spritzed, sudsed, and slathered herself in more than 127 different chemicals, many of them more toxic than beautifying. So how can you look and feel great while safeguarding your health? Get smart and go green from head to toe with the help of eco-expert Gillian Deacon. In The Green Body Guide, you'll learn how By the time she heads out the front door, the modern woman has spritzed, sudsed, and slathered herself in more than 127 different chemicals, many of them more toxic than beautifying. So how can you look and feel great while safeguarding your health? Get smart and go green from head to toe with the help of eco-expert Gillian Deacon. In The Green Body Guide, you'll learn how to read the ingredients to identify and understand the preservatives that are bad for your body and damaging to the earth, including formaldehyde in deodorant, nail polish, soap, shampoo, and shaving cream; coal tar in hair dyes; lead in lipstick; and many more. This is an indispensable handbook of personal-care choices that are sustainable, both for your health and for the earth.


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By the time she heads out the front door, the modern woman has spritzed, sudsed, and slathered herself in more than 127 different chemicals, many of them more toxic than beautifying. So how can you look and feel great while safeguarding your health? Get smart and go green from head to toe with the help of eco-expert Gillian Deacon. In The Green Body Guide, you'll learn how By the time she heads out the front door, the modern woman has spritzed, sudsed, and slathered herself in more than 127 different chemicals, many of them more toxic than beautifying. So how can you look and feel great while safeguarding your health? Get smart and go green from head to toe with the help of eco-expert Gillian Deacon. In The Green Body Guide, you'll learn how to read the ingredients to identify and understand the preservatives that are bad for your body and damaging to the earth, including formaldehyde in deodorant, nail polish, soap, shampoo, and shaving cream; coal tar in hair dyes; lead in lipstick; and many more. This is an indispensable handbook of personal-care choices that are sustainable, both for your health and for the earth.

30 review for There's Lead in Your Lipstick: Toxins in Our Everyday Body Care and How to Avoid Them

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    The book opens with Gillian Deacon's personal story for why she decided to write this book - when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Even though she believed that she had been living a healthy and sustainable lifestyle for years, she realized that one can never be too cautious. Deacon employs a few new vocabulary terms that help to introduce the reader to what Deacon hopes to accomplish with this book - by teaching the readers to be cautious about what to use in, on, and around their bodies. The book opens with Gillian Deacon's personal story for why she decided to write this book - when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Even though she believed that she had been living a healthy and sustainable lifestyle for years, she realized that one can never be too cautious. Deacon employs a few new vocabulary terms that help to introduce the reader to what Deacon hopes to accomplish with this book - by teaching the readers to be cautious about what to use in, on, and around their bodies. The first term is pinkwashing, applying to "big cosmetics corporations that position themselves as leaders in the struggle to eradicate breast cancer... [that] are, in fact, makers and marketers of products that contain many ingredients known or suspected to cause breast cancer." This term is related to the next- greenwashing, in which big corporations do the same thing with environmental awareness. She even gives a list of product lines that fall under this heading on page 10. Deacon's motto throughout the book is "Be your own advocate," and she uses the book to teach the reader how, with multiple resources that can be found both in books and on the internet. The chapter on label reading introduces the reader to the concept of the chemical body burden, which "refers to the accumulation of chemical ingredients in the human body." This chapter was incredibly illuminating, as I am sure most people do not consider the cumulative effect of all of the manufactured products that we use on a day-to-day basis, or even how different chemicals in these different products can react negatively with one another. Governmental bodies such as Health Canada or the U.S. FDA, are also shown to be of little help in curbing the influx of chemicals into the retail market that have been presented to be linked to illness and disease - and are sometimes even prohibited from use in European countries. She gives a list of the 20 worst chemicals to avoid and why on page 31 - a list which had me examining every product in my bathroom. Each chapter begins with some basic information about the body parts mentioned to illustrate why and how the chemicals found in products can harm the body. Every chapter is supplied with a list of products that can be found on the internet applicable to that chapter's topic along with the pros and cons of each product. If that is not enough, she also supplies recipes for do-it-yourself homemade body care products, such as face masks, hair treatments, and lipsticks. The book also teaches that many of the common "spin" words that companies use to promote a product as safe or healthy are, in fact, meaningless, without an industry-standard definition: natural, hypoallergenic, botanicals, pure plant essence, herbal conditioning, purifying, and nourishing, to name a few. Other words can be used to hide chemicals, such as fragrance or perfume, as the companies are not legally required to list the chemicals used to achieve them. Even the regulated word "organic" can not always be trusted as anything with less than 60% organic ingredients can not be truly organic. In short, this book is a priceless commodity for me, and with it I hope to detox both my home and and family, adding years to all of our lives.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Luanne Ollivier

    I've tried in the last few years to clean up the way I eat - less processed and more whole foods. It's absolutely helped with some of my health concerns. But I picked up a copy of There's Lead in Your Lipstick by Gillian Deacon and realized I really hadn't given much thought to all the personal care products I use. Gill Deacon was reading Stacy Malkan's 'Not Just a Pretty Face: The Ugly Side of Beauty' while waiting to have an ultrasound to help diagnose her possible breast cancer. It is in Chapt I've tried in the last few years to clean up the way I eat - less processed and more whole foods. It's absolutely helped with some of my health concerns. But I picked up a copy of There's Lead in Your Lipstick by Gillian Deacon and realized I really hadn't given much thought to all the personal care products I use. Gill Deacon was reading Stacy Malkan's 'Not Just a Pretty Face: The Ugly Side of Beauty' while waiting to have an ultrasound to help diagnose her possible breast cancer. It is in Chapter 6 - "Pinkwashing" that the following appears... "More American women have died of breast cancer in the last 20 years than the number of Americans killed in World War I, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War combined." "Many of the big cosmetics corporations that position themselves as leaders in the struggle to eradicate breast cancer - holding annual fundraisers and pink-ribbon campaigns - are in fact, makers and marketers of products that contain many ingredients known or suspected to cause breast cancer." Deacon's diagnosis was positive. There's Lead in Your Lipstick was started before her diagnosis and finished after her treatment. "This is not a cancer survivor's rant against the chemical industry. This book is simply a guide for all those who want to be cautious and considered when choosing the products and ingredients they use in, on and around their bodies. So when I read, and share with you on these pages, that an ingredient is linked to cancer and other health concerns, I don't take it lightly. Neither, dare I suggest, should any of us." Most of us read food labels quite carefully, now that the ingredients and percentages are listed. But how many of us take the time to investigate what's in our shampoo, make up and deodorant etc. before using it? I didn't. After reading Deacon's book, I won't ever take for granted that 'somebody' is making sure that these products are safe for us. They're not. There's Lead in Your Lipstick is an absolutely fascinating, eye opening, educated look at every type product we use to clean, buff, touch up and make up our bodies. Toxic ingredients and ingredients to look out for are described in depth. Many words used on labels and in advertising aren't necessarily what we think. Natural does not equal organic. Indeed I found myself in the bathroom, book in hand, scouring the labels of my shampoo and body wash. (very scary...) Formaldehyde is banned in Canada, Japan and the European Union but is deemed safe for use in cosmetics in the United States, despite the US EPA classifying it as a carcinogen. Deacon provides alternatives - organic and natural suppliers websites with an in depth review of each. I am checking out these lists for sure. She also provides 'recipes' for many products you can make yourself - facial masks and scrubs for example. The title? The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics found 61% of lipsticks tested contained detectable levels of lead, but none included lead as an ingredient on the label. There's Lead in Your Lipstick is an excellent resource - one I will be referring to often.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    The good: I think it's good to be critical about what you put on and in your body, so I like books that at least make one consider those things. The recipes in the book are excellent. Also, there are references in the back of the book and some aspects of the book seem to be well researched. The bad: I found what I did read to be very repetitive. In every chapter I had to read the same warnings about fragrance, phthalates, parabens, etc, even though it was discussed in detail at the beginning of t The good: I think it's good to be critical about what you put on and in your body, so I like books that at least make one consider those things. The recipes in the book are excellent. Also, there are references in the back of the book and some aspects of the book seem to be well researched. The bad: I found what I did read to be very repetitive. In every chapter I had to read the same warnings about fragrance, phthalates, parabens, etc, even though it was discussed in detail at the beginning of the book. Vague instructions were given about handling essential oils and safety was not at all touched on. Despite the obvious (essential oils are biologically active, hence their therapeutic effects), no information was given on their possible detrimental effects/contraindications and EOs were given a "free pass." On a few occasions, even a high school level of knowledge of physics (see section on hair dryers) or chemistry (see below) was not applied to the text. Despite warnings that the word "natural" does not mean anything on consumer product packaging/advertisements, readers were encouraged to seek out "natural" products for almost the entire book. The ugly: The author doesn't seem to know what "chemical" means, and essentially uses it as a synonym for "toxic" or "synthetic." Every substance made of atoms is a chemical. Water. Table salt. Essential oils. Everything. I mean come on! I don't expect everyone to remember their high school chemistry, but if you're writing a book about chemicals you should at least get that part right! Phrases like "chemical fragrance" as a synonym for "synthetic fragrance," or "chemical-doused arsenal" were tossed around constantly, and the book ends up coming off as unnecessarily chemophobic. The author's point could be made without all the (misleading and/or blatantly incorrect) drama. In reality, many synthetic chemicals are extremely beneficial to human health (insulin, for example), and many chemicals produced by plants are toxic (cyanide and strychnine are well-known examples). Not using correct terminology and feeding widespread chemophobia ruins the author's credibility as a trusted source of information and in my opinion hinders the movement. We should be promoting education, not fear.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    How I Came To Read This Book: I really have no concept of where I first heard of this book...I want to say a magazine twigged me onto it. I ended up getting it from the library, although I have plans to purchase a copy of my own. The Plot: Gillian Deacon breaks down some pretty terrifying myths, namely, that someone is actually regulating what goes into the beauty products we slather onto our hair, skin, and face. The reality is, many of the products we use on a daily basis are extremely toxic to How I Came To Read This Book: I really have no concept of where I first heard of this book...I want to say a magazine twigged me onto it. I ended up getting it from the library, although I have plans to purchase a copy of my own. The Plot: Gillian Deacon breaks down some pretty terrifying myths, namely, that someone is actually regulating what goes into the beauty products we slather onto our hair, skin, and face. The reality is, many of the products we use on a daily basis are extremely toxic to our systems. The book breaks down what ingredients are absolute no-no's, and provides alternatives in the form of other brands & products to check out, and DIY solutions as well. The Good & The Bad: I can honestly say this book is a must-read for literally every woman on the planet. Unless you want to stumble through life blindly putting cancer-causing chemicals into your system on a daily basis, this is at least worth an eye-opening skim-through. Although I generally feel like anything in moderation is okay, the idea that every last one of my products (pretty much) is toxic was pretty sobering. My long-term solution is to slowly swap out products as I run out of them for more natural solutions, and if I can't find an appropriate sub in the natural beauty world, I will probably suck it up and stick with my less-than-awesome beauty regime in some departments. What I most appreciated about this book was the fact Deacon offers 3 approaches to her potentially life-saving advice. The first is a DIY approach - she arms you with the worst of the worst ingredients + points you to an ingredient-cataloguing database to allow you to look at what's currently in your makeup drawer and assess the risk (I unfortunately found out my favourite, must-have concealer contains both Talc & Mineral Oil, which are two baddies on the list). The second is for virtually every product, she offers 1-5 suggestions on a brand / specific product to investigate and try out. Some of them sound genuinely amazing, like the Pangea line and the fruit-tinted 100% Pure collection. Finally the third is a collection of DIY approaches (she also points you on where to pick up a lot of the essential oils and ingredients needed to complete the various recipes in the book) that generally seem to be quite cost-effective and smart. What's also great is that while Gill Deacon is a Canadian, and every product she writes about is available in Canada, the book features brands from around the world, making this equally accessible for Americans. Honestly it's just a great go-to book when you're both transitioning to a more natural regime, and wanting to maintain it over time. Nitpickiness that held this back from being a 5....the layout of the book was a little frustrating, as sidebars were placed in awkward places that made you jump back and forth a bit. Some of the statistics felt a little skewed - perhaps owing to lack of data - but there was something a tiny bit extremist / activist about the tone of this book in certain areas, particularly when spewing facts. And when you're hit with THIS MUCH stuff about how bad your sh*t is, it can be a little overwhelming - by the end I just kind of wanted the onslaught of terror to end (and reliably, the end sections contained some of the more extreme suggestions for greening your beauty routine). Still, a genuine must-read. The Bottom Line: Read this book. Thank me later. Anything Memorable?: Funny timing as I've been working with not one, but two natural beauty companies on the blog as of late. I also saw references to other brands I've featured or worked with before, and the whole thing has left me inspired to write about as many natural brands as possible. 65-Book Challenge?: Book #9 in 2013

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Rayment

    The Not so Good Stuff * A little repetitive * Personally would have organized the Where Can I Find Stuff once at the end of the book instead of at the end of each chapter * No mention of Lush, which concerns me, I love their stuff and always thought it was free of chemicals and toxins - now must research them -- I will be totally pissed if they are being less than honest Favorite Quotes/Passages "We may be complex enough to know that true beauty comes from within ... but we'd like to look the par The Not so Good Stuff * A little repetitive * Personally would have organized the Where Can I Find Stuff once at the end of the book instead of at the end of each chapter * No mention of Lush, which concerns me, I love their stuff and always thought it was free of chemicals and toxins - now must research them -- I will be totally pissed if they are being less than honest Favorite Quotes/Passages "We may be complex enough to know that true beauty comes from within ... but we'd like to look the part on the outside, too." "I must admit that as a teenager, I once tried a tanning bed. I guess I thought I could impress Shaun Cassidy on the off chance he rang my doorbell if I just had a suntan in the middle of February." "He probably reads a full page about world politics and culture before I've even managed to finish moisturizing" What I Learned * About Pinkwashing and Greenwashing -- this is really eye opening * Obviously tons of stuff about the horrific amount of unsafe chemicals in the beauty products I use * Tons of practical advice, especially for switching from a regular toothpaste, to a natural toothpaste Who should/shouldn't read * This is a must read for everyone * A definite must for all libraries 4 Dewey's Don't forget to enter my contest to win a copy of There's Lead in Your Lipstick Details Here (Canada Only and ends Today at Midnight) I received this from Penguin in exchange for an honest review

  6. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    This book, while some info was outdated had me going to my toiletries and doing a full audit. It also made me realize that vegan, cruelty free or organic just isn’t enough. I swapped out about half my beauty products after reading this book. Sephora’s clean beauty category helped a lot!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Little Strawberry Muffin

    Great resource.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Edward B.

    There's lots in here that seems pretty dubious to me; for example: - something-something acid from natural sources is fine, but the "chemical" version is dangerous - this substance is also found in anti-freeze, which will kill you if you drink it, so you shouldn't put anything containing the same substance on your skin - blahblah is "bad", is found in 97% of Americans' bodies, and is also in some sunscreens, therefore sunscreen must be where they got it from - regular hairdryers emit harmful [um There's lots in here that seems pretty dubious to me; for example: - something-something acid from natural sources is fine, but the "chemical" version is dangerous - this substance is also found in anti-freeze, which will kill you if you drink it, so you shouldn't put anything containing the same substance on your skin - blahblah is "bad", is found in 97% of Americans' bodies, and is also in some sunscreens, therefore sunscreen must be where they got it from - regular hairdryers emit harmful [um, electromagnetic] radiation, so if you must use a hair-dryer get one that blows negative (not postive) ions [!?!] Much more convincing are statements like: In the European Union, X has been banned from Y class of products for ten years. There are citations in the endnotes, so at least everything is not just a bald assertion, and I could try to verify some of the claims if I was so inclined. And of course, I don't believe for a minute that the multinational corporations making these products aren't going to do so as cheaply as possible and without any qualms about ingredients that have not be proved safe for humans. Actually, I'll go further, and expect that they would still use ingredients that had been proved harmful, until either the government banned them or there was a huge consumer backlash. Naturally, these companies have no interest in evaluating any potential harms themselves (until an independent scientist gets some traction showing harm; then the companies would "sponsor" their own study to refute that, of course.) Anyway, I will look at some of the web resources of environmental groups that she mentions though. And I will look into at least a few of the alternative "green" products that she recommends.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A great resource for those who are looking to clean up their beauty/bodycare regimes. Deacon's style is perfect for this topic: the writing is conversational, never preachy; the content never watered-down (see:No More Dirty Looks: The Truth About Your Beauty Products and the Ultimate Guide to Safe and Clean Cosmetics - I recall an instance in this book where the authors joke about not knowing what purpose sea buckthorn serves in a product, but that they trust "Dr. H[aushka]" regardless. Fine as A great resource for those who are looking to clean up their beauty/bodycare regimes. Deacon's style is perfect for this topic: the writing is conversational, never preachy; the content never watered-down (see:No More Dirty Looks: The Truth About Your Beauty Products and the Ultimate Guide to Safe and Clean Cosmetics - I recall an instance in this book where the authors joke about not knowing what purpose sea buckthorn serves in a product, but that they trust "Dr. H[aushka]" regardless. Fine as a first foray into the subject, but I would not recommend it beyond that). And of course, lots of Canada-convenient alternatives to conventional drugstore products. It can be a wee bit repetitive at times, but I find that this contributes to my overall familiarity of the toxins to avoid and why, so it's hardly something to complain about. I refer to this all the time!

  10. 4 out of 5

    hanna

    I picked up this book thinking "hm, I threw out virtually all my conventional beauty products, let's see if there was something I overlooked". Since going vegan 2 yrs ago, I pretty much cleaned my life and my medicine and makeup bag was where I started. I threw out shampoo, never to buy another conventional bottle again, face washes (although i was never really a fan) & all my makeup. I bought from brands like 100% pure and Aubrey Organics which the author mentioned is a greener more healthy alt I picked up this book thinking "hm, I threw out virtually all my conventional beauty products, let's see if there was something I overlooked". Since going vegan 2 yrs ago, I pretty much cleaned my life and my medicine and makeup bag was where I started. I threw out shampoo, never to buy another conventional bottle again, face washes (although i was never really a fan) & all my makeup. I bought from brands like 100% pure and Aubrey Organics which the author mentioned is a greener more healthy alternative. I think this book is validating all my "weird" life choices. Using a miswak instead of a toothbrush, using diy peppermint paste w coconut oil instead of toothpaste, some people just think i'm flat out crazy when they see the way I avoid products. But I feel that if more people were better aware of the harmful effects of the everyday products they use well surely, (if they are rational) they'd chuck it all out just as I did.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    This book, along with "Slow Death By Rubber Duck", really has changed my outlook on every day toxins and the chemical body burden we all share. I highly recommend reading both books. When I looked at the labels of all my personal care products, including the ones that stated they were 'natural' and 'hypoallergenic', I was disgusted by what I found. A few months ago I had already switched from conventional commercial household cleaners to basically vinegar, baking soda and lemons, and now plan on This book, along with "Slow Death By Rubber Duck", really has changed my outlook on every day toxins and the chemical body burden we all share. I highly recommend reading both books. When I looked at the labels of all my personal care products, including the ones that stated they were 'natural' and 'hypoallergenic', I was disgusted by what I found. A few months ago I had already switched from conventional commercial household cleaners to basically vinegar, baking soda and lemons, and now plan on completely changing the personal care products I use based on the advice of Gillian Deacon. I am aware that there is no hard evidence that the 'toxins' listed in this book (such as phthalates and parabens) are directly harmful or carcinogenic, but the indirect evidence is good enough for me to make this switch. It won't hurt, and it may in the long run be helpful.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    If you want to know why, over the past several years, I've replaced close to 90% of my family's personal care items with natural products, read this book. It's very similar to "No More Dirty Looks," which I also really liked, but this book is written by a Canadian author and features many Canadian brands or, at the very least, brands that are available here. (NMDL is written with only an American audience in mind, so most of the products recommended by them are not available in Canada. Irked me. If you want to know why, over the past several years, I've replaced close to 90% of my family's personal care items with natural products, read this book. It's very similar to "No More Dirty Looks," which I also really liked, but this book is written by a Canadian author and features many Canadian brands or, at the very least, brands that are available here. (NMDL is written with only an American audience in mind, so most of the products recommended by them are not available in Canada. Irked me.)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Belinda

    At times the author sounds like a Debbie Downer type, but that's probably difficult to avoid considering the topic of the book. The sections titled "THE SCARE" was probably a bit too much! It was an informative read and I will certainly take a double look at cosmetic ingredients from now on, but in reality I am sure some will find it hard to give up their MAC lipsticks for some obscure organic brand that costs twice as much. The homemade beauty recipes are quite good and I hope to give those a t At times the author sounds like a Debbie Downer type, but that's probably difficult to avoid considering the topic of the book. The sections titled "THE SCARE" was probably a bit too much! It was an informative read and I will certainly take a double look at cosmetic ingredients from now on, but in reality I am sure some will find it hard to give up their MAC lipsticks for some obscure organic brand that costs twice as much. The homemade beauty recipes are quite good and I hope to give those a try.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A fantastic resource for reading labels and choosing safer products. While I do sometimes question a blanket distrust of chemicals (everything is a chemical if you look closely enough), that doesn't undermine the power of this book: a revealing of the unnecessary and potentially harmful ingredients that are added to products we use on a daily basis. I don't want to go all this-book-changed-my-life on you, but it's been four years since I've used a toothpaste with an added foaming agent. So, you A fantastic resource for reading labels and choosing safer products. While I do sometimes question a blanket distrust of chemicals (everything is a chemical if you look closely enough), that doesn't undermine the power of this book: a revealing of the unnecessary and potentially harmful ingredients that are added to products we use on a daily basis. I don't want to go all this-book-changed-my-life on you, but it's been four years since I've used a toothpaste with an added foaming agent. So, you know, take from that what you will.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    I'm about half-way through and I'm thinking this is a must-read! What I love about this book is that it gives you the opportunity to make informed decisions about the personal care products you buy without pressuring you. It gives you the information and you can decide for yourself what you want to do, if anything.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Terra

    This provocative book by Canadian Gillian Deacon has opened by eyes to all the harmful poisons we put on or bodies. I eat well, but I put some pretty horrible things without knowing the harm I could be doing. I have bought new shampoo, conditioner and toothpaste. I love all the recipies to make your own products.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lorna

    You have to read this book. Wow. The amount of toxic ingredients that are allowed in body care products is shocking. What an eye opener. This book has made me much more vigilant about what we're putting in and on our bodies. Gillian Deacon clearly lists products to avoid and why, and recommends more natural products to be used in their place.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Heather Doig

    I did like this book. Many of the chemicals Ms. Deacon listed are irritants and linked to cancer, as she says. Her sources are all cited; all of the citations are not within text or footnotes, though, and are in the pack of the book. Ms. Deacon also repeats herself often, as the book is meant to be read more as a reference guide than all at once like a novel.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Janet Barclay

    I didn't actually read it from cover to cover. I realized I wouldn't be able to retain the information I needed to make smart choices, and since it was a library book which had to be returned, I made note of the recommended products and toxins to avoid. It is jam packed with valuable information and I may try to read it again in the future.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    Really insightful read. A little overwhelming with facts (and making me a bit paranoid about all the products we use every day) but a very interesting read nonetheless. Take from it what you will but the fact is, many products we use really do have these toxins in the ingredients.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Joy

    SCARIEST BOOK EVER. I just threw out half the stuff in my bathroom. I have a feeling some of the stuff in here is exaggerated a bit. I am all for lessening the chemicals in my life, but this is getting ridiculous.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Camille

    Amazing and very interesting book that open our eyes on the cosmetic industry who, once again only think about money. I loved this book and it help me to incorporate natural products around me, thanks to the DIY and the links of natural products to buy in the book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    amazing....actually bought the book after borrowing it from the library!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    good reference for finding alternatives to the toxic chemicals in the drugstore.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

    Great information. Overwhelming because I don't really want to think about all of the things that cause cancer. But I want to know more so that I can do better.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Completely eye-opening and enlightening! I had no idea the amount of toxins and carcinogens in our everyday body care. It's appalling. My current beauty products are going in the trash.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Meganathan

    Great info and recommendations about what are safe, natural products to use that won't harm you! She even gives recipes for how to make your own beauty products.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Grazyna Krupa

    Smart, spirited, very useful and not a bit preachy. One of the better books about implementing green practices into your life. Gill writes with wit and panache, the advice is perennial.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ro-z

    :-O !!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Bezan

    Highly accessible and full of excellent resources on living a greener lifestyle.

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