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Stories by Arthur C. Clarke, Jack Finney, Joe Haldeman, Ursula K. Le Guin H.G. Wells's seminal novella The Time Machine, published in 1895, provided the springboard for modern science fiction's time travel explosion. Responding to their own fascination with the subject, the greatest visionary writers of the twentieth century penned some of their finest stories. Here are ei Stories by Arthur C. Clarke, Jack Finney, Joe Haldeman, Ursula K. Le Guin H.G. Wells's seminal novella The Time Machine, published in 1895, provided the springboard for modern science fiction's time travel explosion. Responding to their own fascination with the subject, the greatest visionary writers of the twentieth century penned some of their finest stories. Here are eighteen of the most exciting tales ever told.


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Stories by Arthur C. Clarke, Jack Finney, Joe Haldeman, Ursula K. Le Guin H.G. Wells's seminal novella The Time Machine, published in 1895, provided the springboard for modern science fiction's time travel explosion. Responding to their own fascination with the subject, the greatest visionary writers of the twentieth century penned some of their finest stories. Here are ei Stories by Arthur C. Clarke, Jack Finney, Joe Haldeman, Ursula K. Le Guin H.G. Wells's seminal novella The Time Machine, published in 1895, provided the springboard for modern science fiction's time travel explosion. Responding to their own fascination with the subject, the greatest visionary writers of the twentieth century penned some of their finest stories. Here are eighteen of the most exciting tales ever told.

30 review for The Best Time Travel Stories of the 20th Century

  1. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I'm listing all the stories so I can remember which authors to read more by. 1. "Sailing to Byzantium" by Robert Silverberg - This was one of my favorites. I thought its premise was really original and yet it was largely character-driven. 2. "The Man Who Came Early" by Poul Anderson. - Okay. I don't remember a great deal about this one, so I don't think it made much of an impression. 3. "Fire Watch" by Connie Willis. - Another favorite. I enjoyed the premise of this one a lot too, about a future w I'm listing all the stories so I can remember which authors to read more by. 1. "Sailing to Byzantium" by Robert Silverberg - This was one of my favorites. I thought its premise was really original and yet it was largely character-driven. 2. "The Man Who Came Early" by Poul Anderson. - Okay. I don't remember a great deal about this one, so I don't think it made much of an impression. 3. "Fire Watch" by Connie Willis. - Another favorite. I enjoyed the premise of this one a lot too, about a future where graduate students of history go back in time for their practical exam. 4. "Rainbird" by R.A. Lafferty. - Good. Has a trite message but it doesn't take itself too seriously and was therefore enjoyable. 5. "A Sound of Thunder" by Ray Bradbury. - Dated and flat. One of the worst stories I have ever read, ever. 6. "Time Locker" by Henry Kuttner. - This reminded me a lot of Bester at the beginning. The ending was kind of silly, sort of dated. 7. "A Gun For Dinosaur" by L. Sprague du Camp. - A lot of dinosaur stories in this collection. This one was pretty good. 8. "Another Story or The Fisherman of the Inland Sea" by Ursula K Le Guin. - One of my favorite stories I've read in a long time. 9. "Leviathan!" by Larry Niven. - Just okay. 10. "Yesterday Was Monday" by Theodore Sturgeon. - I liked this one. 11. "The Price of Oranges" by Nancy Kress. - Harry and Manny were great, but the granddaughter's character was two-dimensional and the ending was so ham-handed. 12. "Death Ship" by Richard Matheson. - Not great, but okay. 13. "Trapalanda" by Charles Sheffield. - I liked this one a lot. 15. "The Pure Product" by John Kessel. - I liked this one a lot. It reminded me of Joey Comeau. 16. "I'm Scared" by Jack Finney. - Another great one. I really liked the ending. 17. "Timetipping" by Jack Dann. - A little jumbled. 18. "The Anniversary Project" by Joe Haldeman. - I can't even remember how this one ends.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    As is true in so many compilations, the stories in this book vary from so-so to wonderful. In the process of making my way through them, I discovered that maybe time travel per se is not the type of science fiction I really enjoy. There were more than I needed of encounters with dinosaurs and other real or imaginary creatures of the past. I find I much prefer stories that explore the complex possibilities and impossibilities created by time travel, and the confusion of people as they try to deal As is true in so many compilations, the stories in this book vary from so-so to wonderful. In the process of making my way through them, I discovered that maybe time travel per se is not the type of science fiction I really enjoy. There were more than I needed of encounters with dinosaurs and other real or imaginary creatures of the past. I find I much prefer stories that explore the complex possibilities and impossibilities created by time travel, and the confusion of people as they try to deal with it. Examples are "Yesterday was Monday," "Time Locker," "I'm Scared," "The Man Who Came Early," and "Timetipping." The last 3 stories in the book may be the best. I've long been a fan of Nancy Kress & Ursula Le Guin, but didn't know of Charles Sheffield (even though he was Kress's husband), and now want to explore more of his works.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amber the Human

    While I am not a science fiction fan, I am a fan of time travel. This book had some amazing stories. Getting to read the original story about dinosaur hunting by Ray Bradbury that the Simpsons toaster vignette was based on -awesome. Sailing to Byzenteam was a long one, but interesting. My favorite was probably Tranpalanda. Where is my book currently? I lent it to an intern at work ... I'll ask her mom about it soon. :-) And shout out to Kat for giving it to me!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Madhulika Liddle

    The Best Time Travel Stories of the 20th Century consists of sixteen stories, ranging from short ones to novellas, all on the theme of time travel. There are big names here, from Arthur C Clarke to Ursula Le Guin, who would be familiar names even to those not especially clued into sci fi—to others, possibly less familiar. The stories, edited (and with a very useful introduction) by Harry Turtledove, seemed to me to be arranged in a way that would benefit the novice reader, someone new to this ge The Best Time Travel Stories of the 20th Century consists of sixteen stories, ranging from short ones to novellas, all on the theme of time travel. There are big names here, from Arthur C Clarke to Ursula Le Guin, who would be familiar names even to those not especially clued into sci fi—to others, possibly less familiar. The stories, edited (and with a very useful introduction) by Harry Turtledove, seemed to me to be arranged in a way that would benefit the novice reader, someone new to this genre: shorter stories first; longer stories later. Simpler stories, the type that one has seen adapted to screen again and again, first (hunting dinosaurs in the prehistoric world, anyone?); more complex stories, which examine facets other than pure adventure, later. The sheer variety in the theme of time travel that these stories depict is stunning in itself. The reasons for time travel, the extent of the travel, the direction of the travel, the consequences of the travel: all of these, and more, are explored in sixteen very interesting ways. And there’s also a fair bit of genre crossover: other genres interwoven with time travel. History, of course, is the obvious and most impactful, especially in Robert Silverberg’s pretty epic Sailing to Byzantium, where a man finds himself in some very far distant future where Earth’s iconic cities—Alexandria, Mohenjodaro, Timbuktoo among them—are routinely recreated, to entertain tourists. History and historical events also play an important part in Connie Willis’s Fire Watch and Poul Anderson’s The Man Who Came Early, the latter a somewhat unusual story in this collection, since the narration is from the point of view, not of the time-traveller, but of a befuddled medieval Icelander who meets him. Where Henry Kuttner’s darkly humorous Time Locker uses crime as an interwoven genre, Richard Matheson’s Death Ship ventures into the supernatural (if you consider time travel as something other than supernatural, that is). There are warm stories of love here (Nancy Kress’s The Price of Oranges is a case in point), and stories of pure ambition. There’s hard core science in some, in others there’s only a brief indication that something acts as a conduit between eras. There’s plenty of variation to not make each story a variant of the others. As is natural, there were some stories here that I liked more than others. There were only a couple I didn’t like, and one (Charles Sheffield’s Trapalanda) where I felt thoroughly let down by the end. On the whole, though, a fine collection, and very enjoyable.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Flo

    It's difficult to apply a rating to the entire anthology, since some of the stories were not as fun to read as the others. In any case, since I'm a big fan of time travel, I read through every one of them. As with a lot of short stories, you're sometimes left wishing the story was a whole novel. At least this anthology is a good way follow-up with the authors you really liked. Turtledove does a good job of highlighting each individual authors' notable novels. My favorites (not necessarily in orde It's difficult to apply a rating to the entire anthology, since some of the stories were not as fun to read as the others. In any case, since I'm a big fan of time travel, I read through every one of them. As with a lot of short stories, you're sometimes left wishing the story was a whole novel. At least this anthology is a good way follow-up with the authors you really liked. Turtledove does a good job of highlighting each individual authors' notable novels. My favorites (not necessarily in order of preference): Time Locker Another Story or The Fisherman of the Inland Sea Trapalanda

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    “Time’ s Arrow” "In Arthur C. Clarke’s classic, two brilliant physicists finally crack the mystery of time travel–with appalling consequences." Dependent upon the punch, would make a reader of a magazine issue stand up and cheer, but unnecessary. 3* “Death Ship” "Richard Matheson, author of Somewhere in Time, unveils a chilling scenario concerning three astronauts who stumble upon the conundrum of past and future." Well done, was a Twilight Zone episode, would stand up to rereading, but I didn't “Time’ s Arrow” "In Arthur C. Clarke’s classic, two brilliant physicists finally crack the mystery of time travel–with appalling consequences." Dependent upon the punch, would make a reader of a magazine issue stand up and cheer, but unnecessary. 3* “Death Ship” "Richard Matheson, author of Somewhere in Time, unveils a chilling scenario concerning three astronauts who stumble upon the conundrum of past and future." Well done, was a Twilight Zone episode, would stand up to rereading, but I didn't care much for it. 3* “Yesterday was Monday” "If all the world’s a stage, Theodore Sturgeon’s compelling tale follows the odyssey of an ordinary joe who winds up backstage." Funny the first time but I've read it elsewhere, maybe 3* “Rainbird” "R.A. Lafferty reflects on what might have been in this brainteaser about an inventor so brilliant that he invents himself right out of existence." Brief, but nevertheless I liked the 'story' itself better than the punch, which is hand-wavium. Wouldn't stand up to a reread. 2* “Timetipping” "What if everyone time-traveled except you? Jack Dann provides some surprising answers in this literary gem." Um, no, it's just a bit of shtick. Unstarred. "I'm Scared" "Jack Finney" When too many people yearn nostalgically for the past, or strive to the accomplishments of the future, can time itself resist the pressure? Bad title for a nice little story, almost literary. Imagonna give it 4* "The Man Who Came Early" "Poul Anderson" More like literary fantasy? I dunno; I skimmed it because I remembered reading it before and not liking it, & it's kinda long. Unrated, to be fair. "A Gun for Dinosaur" "L. Sprague de Camp" Frustrating pulp adventure, but nicely detailed and thought out in some ways. 2.5* "Anniversary Project" "Joe Haldeman" Cute tale about the no-longer-quite-human beings of the imaginably far future and how they study 2oth C. man. 2.5* "Time Locker" "Henry Kuttner" Kinda like detective noir. 3* "A Sound of Thunder" "Ray Bradbury" Two readings would have been plenty, but I suppose it's groundbreaking or something. 3* "Leviathan!" "Larry Niven" Very clever. Definitely 4 full *. I don't want to spoil it for you. "Fire Watch" "Connie Willis" skipped, too long for me to care to reread "Trapalanda" "Charles Sheffield" required some patience to see the points of the side stories and characters... and then after all the payoff was minimal as was the TT element. 3 * "Sailing to Byzantium" "Robert Silverberg" Did not expect to like this as I never have liked Silverberg before. But I'm giving this novellette 4*! Hmm... "The Pure Product" "John Kessel" I don't get it. Yuck. "The Price of Oranges" "Nancy Kress" Cute. Like a very nice Twilight Zone episode, but it would have had to have been a two-parter because all the details add to its charm. 4* "Another Story or A Fisherman on the Inland Sea" "Ursula K. Le Guin" dnf... Le Guin and I are very seldom in sync. (Ok, now, to average all the stars... 39 * / 12 actual ratings... close to three... interesting, because overall I really didn't feel as if I liked it that much. Hm. Will def. look for more by Kress, and consider more by Silverberg after all, already have read Finney and tried Niven. Alrighty then.) (Please forgive formatting. Afaik, this is the only complete list of contents on GR. I don't have the energy to put it in order and tidy it up though. Fyi, in the book the stories are in chronological order of publication, which surprised me at times because some writers' long careers overlapped and so someone I thought of as younger would have an earlier story.)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    For over a century time travel has remained one of the most enduring categories of science fiction. Authors such as Mark Twain and H. G. Wells established many of the ideas that were subsequently encapsulated in numerous stories that have entertained millions of readers. This anthology bring together eighteen stories from many of the giants of the field. Some, such as Theodore Sturgeon’s “Yesterday was Monday” and Ray Bradbury’s “A Sound of Thunder” are true classics, while others like Connie Wi For over a century time travel has remained one of the most enduring categories of science fiction. Authors such as Mark Twain and H. G. Wells established many of the ideas that were subsequently encapsulated in numerous stories that have entertained millions of readers. This anthology bring together eighteen stories from many of the giants of the field. Some, such as Theodore Sturgeon’s “Yesterday was Monday” and Ray Bradbury’s “A Sound of Thunder” are true classics, while others like Connie Wills’s “Fire Watch” are destined to join them as among the greatest stories of the genre. With a collection like this, it is easy to criticize some of the selections. Many longtime readers will complain about the exclusion of a favorite tale or the inclusion of one that they do not like (my personal complaint is with the inclusion of Robert Silverberg’s “Sailing to Byzantium”, which while an all-time favorite of mine and one of the best novellas ever written technically isn't really a time travel story). Yet it is hard to complain about the collection as a whole, which has a good balance of stories from different premises, authors, and stories. Fans of the genre will find much to enjoy in this book, while anyone seeking to learn what the field has to offer will be impressed with the imagination and the writing contained within these pages.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lincoln

    Ahh...Time travel Its kind of an authors get out of jail free card. Wait that can't happen he is my favorite character he can't die...oh stop time go back fix it. I like real history and the idea of manipulating factual events. The big what if questions. Good old "The Sound of Thunder" stepping on a butterfly 65 million years ago changes language and culture in the present.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tim Fitzpatrick

    Okay, so first of all, any book with the words Best, Time Travel, and 20th Century that doesn't include Heinlein's By His Bootstraps or All You Zombies, that's a non-starter. I gave this one 3 stars overall, as it was really hit or miss for me. A number of the stories didn't even fit in the theme of Time Travel, in my opinion, and that included a few I really liked. Some were pretty good, others meh. I guess that's to be expected in an anthology, but I had hoped for more given the "Best" title, p Okay, so first of all, any book with the words Best, Time Travel, and 20th Century that doesn't include Heinlein's By His Bootstraps or All You Zombies, that's a non-starter. I gave this one 3 stars overall, as it was really hit or miss for me. A number of the stories didn't even fit in the theme of Time Travel, in my opinion, and that included a few I really liked. Some were pretty good, others meh. I guess that's to be expected in an anthology, but I had hoped for more given the "Best" title, plus Harry Turtledove and Martin H. Greenberg's involvement. I would recommend: "Yesterday Was Monday" (Theodore Sturgeon) "Time Locker" (Henry Kuttner) "Time's Arrow" (Arthur C. Clarke) "Death Ship" (Richard Matheson) "Leviathan!" (Larry Niven) "Fire Watch" (Connie Willis) "Another Story or a Fisherman of the Inland Sea" (Ursula K. Le Guin)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    When I read a collection of short stories, I generally start not at the beginning, but with the shortest stories first. If those first few "really short" stories whet my appetite, I'll move up to the longer stories. This collection grabbed me from story #1. Just about every one of them held my attention and my imagination. Granted, some of them read like episodes of "The Twilight Zone" or "Outer Limits" (in fact, several were adapted for TV). This only adds to their appeal, in my opinion, especia When I read a collection of short stories, I generally start not at the beginning, but with the shortest stories first. If those first few "really short" stories whet my appetite, I'll move up to the longer stories. This collection grabbed me from story #1. Just about every one of them held my attention and my imagination. Granted, some of them read like episodes of "The Twilight Zone" or "Outer Limits" (in fact, several were adapted for TV). This only adds to their appeal, in my opinion, especially if you've seen the episodes - you get to see just how much was left out (even from a short story). Perhaps the weakest (or most incoherent) story was "Timetipping", but it is overloaded with great stories. I think the best thing about this collection is that it spans the range of *ways* of time traveling: machine, magic, aliens, future visitors, and even just leaving it mysterious about what is happening or why. There's even suggestions in the forward for other yet-to-be-written stories. In other words, it's not all "Back to the Future" "butterfly effect" stories, and that makes it fun.

  11. 4 out of 5

    John

    When I got my first Kindle for Christmas in 2009, this was the first e-book I read. Being a big fan of time-travel stories, I immediately searched the Kindle archives for any stories on this subject. And since I hadn't read anything in years (other than listening to an occassional audio book), I figured a collection of short stories would be a little easier to digest and help get me back into a routine. As with any collection of short stories, some selections are better than others. The stories I When I got my first Kindle for Christmas in 2009, this was the first e-book I read. Being a big fan of time-travel stories, I immediately searched the Kindle archives for any stories on this subject. And since I hadn't read anything in years (other than listening to an occassional audio book), I figured a collection of short stories would be a little easier to digest and help get me back into a routine. As with any collection of short stories, some selections are better than others. The stories I enjoyed the most were "Yesterday was Monday" by Theodore Sturgeon, "Timetipping" by Jack Dann, and "Sailing to Byzantium" by Robert Silverburg. This last story was not only an excellent addition to the time-travel canon, it also offers an interesting look at a society's obsession with youthful perfection (not unlike our current society).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Paton Smith

    I'm not sure how to rate this book, since it's an anthology. There is an intro to each story about the author, which is interesting background information and helpful to set the context for the story. I enjoyed some stories more than others. I particularly enjoyed the following stories: "I'm Scared" by Jack Finney "A Sound of Thunder" by Ray Bradbury "Death Ship" by Richard Matheson "A Gun for Dinosaur" by L. Sprague de Camp. "The Man Who Came Early" "Leviathan" "Sailing to Byzantium" "Trapalanda" "The Pr I'm not sure how to rate this book, since it's an anthology. There is an intro to each story about the author, which is interesting background information and helpful to set the context for the story. I enjoyed some stories more than others. I particularly enjoyed the following stories: "I'm Scared" by Jack Finney "A Sound of Thunder" by Ray Bradbury "Death Ship" by Richard Matheson "A Gun for Dinosaur" by L. Sprague de Camp. "The Man Who Came Early" "Leviathan" "Sailing to Byzantium" "Trapalanda" "The Price of Oranges" "Another Story or a Fisherman of the Inland Sea"

  13. 5 out of 5

    James Anderson

    This was a very entertaining collection of stories. If you like time travel as a plot device, this book will probably be pretty enjoyable for you. There were 1 or 2 stories that took some getting into, but I can say without hesitation that there were no duds in the whole anthology. This is my first GoodReads suggested book. Good job GoodReads!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    A solid collection; all of them good reads but none really outstanding. Apart from the Le Guin at the end, of course :)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    All good with the slightest caveat - I could not read the Robert Silverberg story no matter how many times I tried - I found it to be tedious, ponderous dreck.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Some bad ones, many ordinary ones, and a few notable selections.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ginny

    I was crazy excited to read this, and kind of disappointed once I finished. I only liked about half the stories, and imo some of them weren't even about time travel (I'm looking at you, "Death Ship" and "Trapalanda.") I found this to be a poorly curated anthology. The stories I liked were: (view spoiler)[- Time's Arrow by Arthur C. Clark: Scientists go back in time only to be eaten by dinos. I liked that the whole story was told from the point of view not of the scientists actually traveling throu I was crazy excited to read this, and kind of disappointed once I finished. I only liked about half the stories, and imo some of them weren't even about time travel (I'm looking at you, "Death Ship" and "Trapalanda.") I found this to be a poorly curated anthology. The stories I liked were: (view spoiler)[- Time's Arrow by Arthur C. Clark: Scientists go back in time only to be eaten by dinos. I liked that the whole story was told from the point of view not of the scientists actually traveling through time, but by the paleontologists working nearby who uncover the results in the fossil record. Jeep tracks smashed by a giant footprint! A Sound of Thunder by Ray Bradbury: Apparently he was the originator of the idea of "the butterfly effect." A short but effective tale on the potential large-scale impact of even the smallest changes to the past. Rainbird by R.A. Lafferty: One inventor's life changes for the better--and then the worse--as his older self makes a number of trips back in time to talk to his younger self, trying to offer advice and direction. A little one-man knot of alternate timelines and realities. Sailing to Byzantium: I like far-future fiction because it really can go anywhere. This 50th century future was a barren world with only five cities, always replicas of different ancient cities that change regularly. The idea of "temporaries" and "citizens" was rather disconcerting, and the whole society seemed rather shallow and disconnected from reality. I enjoyed the exploration of mortality, identity, and self via the idea of "visitors" and "short-timers." The Pure Product by John Kessel: Super disconcerting--a time traveling serial killer who considers murder and mayham a form of artwork. Trapalanda by Charles Sheffield: Although I didn't consider this truly time-travel, I did like it. The concept was interesting and the description of John and Helga going through the "generator" (and the description of Klaus coming back out) was awesome. The Price of Oranges by Nancy Kress: A time-traveling grandpa who just wants to get socks and food for his best friend and find a date for his unhappy granddaughter wreaks a bit of havoc. This was a very charming read. Another Story OR Fisherman of the Inland Sea by Ursula K. Le Guin: My favorite story of the bunch. A man gets the unexpected chance to live his life over and choose a different path. This was part of Le Guin's Hainish stories, and there were some fun easter eggs referring to other novels and stories in the series for those who have read them. (hide spoiler)]

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shanna

    Time-travel plays a role in each story, but often in unexpected ways. These stories are clever and entertaining. Overall a very good collection. “Yesterday Was Monday” by Theodore Sturgeon ***A man stumbles backstage of “life”. “Time Locker” by Henry Kuttner ****Weird but cool take on the paradox of time travel, involving a time-warping locker. “Time’s Arrow” by Arthur C. Clarke *****Paleontology meets time travel, leading to a chilling discovery. “Death Ship” by Richard Matheson *****A trio of space Time-travel plays a role in each story, but often in unexpected ways. These stories are clever and entertaining. Overall a very good collection. “Yesterday Was Monday” by Theodore Sturgeon ***A man stumbles backstage of “life”. “Time Locker” by Henry Kuttner ****Weird but cool take on the paradox of time travel, involving a time-warping locker. “Time’s Arrow” by Arthur C. Clarke *****Paleontology meets time travel, leading to a chilling discovery. “Death Ship” by Richard Matheson *****A trio of space travelers find a crashed ship on an alien planet, and then things get very interesting. I did not see the ending coming on this one, and it was great! “A Gun for Dinosaur” by L. Sprague De Camp ****Hunters travel back in time for the ultimate game. “The Man Who Came Early” by Poul Anderson ***A soldier is accidentally and unexpectedly transported a thousand years back in time. Not surprising, he has difficulty fitting in. “Rainbird” by R. A. Lafferty ****After a long life, an inventor travels back in time to give his younger self advice. “Leviathan!” by Larry Niven ***Time travel is used to collect souvenirs of the past. “Anniversary Project” by Joe Haldeman ****Far-future beings travel back in time to find someone who knows how to read. Interesting concept of the evolution of humans over a million years. “Timetipping” by Jack Dann *Confusing story that has characters popping in and out of the time. “Fire Watch” Connie Willis ***Historians of the future are able to travel back in time to study the past first-hand. For his course final, a student goes back to the Blitz in 1940’s London. “Sailing to Byzantium” by Robert Silverberg ****A man from the past is living in the far-future and not really fitting in. I did get bored by some of the long-winded descriptions of the cities, but the twist I didn’t see coming brought the story back for me. I didn’t really understand the ending. But I still liked it. “The Pure Product” by John Kessel **A man from the future runs around randomly murdering people. I never got why. Dark and disturbing. “Traplanda” by Charles Sheffield ***A wealthy eccentric hires an adventure guide to help him find a treasure. Turns out treasure means different things to different people. “The Price of Oranges” by Nancy Kress ****A man goes back in time to bring back happiness for his daughter, and he succeeds in an unexpected way. “Another Story or A Fisherman of the inland Sea” by Ursula K. Le Guin *****An experiment in teleportation inadvertently results in giving a man a second chance.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dhove

    I expected to like this book better than "Best Alternate History", but...I didn't. Which is weird because time travel is my favorite brand of sci-fi. Maybe the problem is that it started to feel repetitive. I basically skipped three whole stories and slept my way through a couple more. Here's the breakdown: Yesterday was Monday / Theodore Sturgeon This was a neat concept. One of the better stories. Time locker / Henry Kuttner Time's arrow / Arthur C. Clarke A sound of thunder / Ray Bradbury These I expected to like this book better than "Best Alternate History", but...I didn't. Which is weird because time travel is my favorite brand of sci-fi. Maybe the problem is that it started to feel repetitive. I basically skipped three whole stories and slept my way through a couple more. Here's the breakdown: Yesterday was Monday / Theodore Sturgeon This was a neat concept. One of the better stories. Time locker / Henry Kuttner Time's arrow / Arthur C. Clarke A sound of thunder / Ray Bradbury These are classic time travel stories. "Sound of Thunder" is probably one of the most well known. A gun for dinosaur / L. Sprague de Camp This was basically a less gritty repeat of "Sound of Thunder". Not bad, but... I'm scared / Jack Finney Death ship / Richard Matheson The two best stories of this whole book. "Death Ship" reads exactly like an episode of Twilight Zone. Anniversary project / Joe Haldeman Sailing to Byzantium / Robert Silverberg These two come in second place. Both had great premises and "Byzantium" has a cool plot twist, but they both wind up with rushed endings that are not as good as I thought they would be. Leviathan! / Larry Niven Honorable mention for a neat explanation of just what could have happened to all the mythical creatures in history. The price of oranges / Nancy Kress Good, but it's basically like the pre-JFK part of "11/22/63". Points for LGBT representation at a time when that couldn't have been very common. The man who came early / Poul Anderson Rainbird / R.A. Lafferty Fire watch / Connie Willis Timetipping / Jack Dann I mean...these are okay, but this is probably when I started getting bored with this book. The pure product / John Kessel Trapalanda / Charles Sheffield Another story or A fisherman of the inland sea / Ursula K. Le Guin. I didn't even bother with these. Or rather, I tried to read a couple pages, got bored and skipped to the next one.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Doren Damico

    I enjoyed the imagination displayed in this range of short stories about time travel. The format is a big plus, with short introductions about each author and other books they have penned, that provides suggestions for further reading. Of the tales, my 3 top favorites were in this order: Anniversary Project by Joe Haldeman, Another Story or A Fisherman of the Inland Sea by Ursula K. Le Guin, and Trapalanda by Charles Sheffield. Of course, there is merit to every story and how it bends, crosses, I enjoyed the imagination displayed in this range of short stories about time travel. The format is a big plus, with short introductions about each author and other books they have penned, that provides suggestions for further reading. Of the tales, my 3 top favorites were in this order: Anniversary Project by Joe Haldeman, Another Story or A Fisherman of the Inland Sea by Ursula K. Le Guin, and Trapalanda by Charles Sheffield. Of course, there is merit to every story and how it bends, crosses, and touches times known and unknown. It seems that time travel stories are further intriguing by their connections or alterations of historical events, or their play with familiar literature. The one I found most satisfying in this regard would be Leviathan! by Larry Niven, in which a search for fantastic creatures of the past, erroneously nets a familiar Albino whale! My only criticism of the book, is its limited representation of female authors, only 3 out of 18! However that inspired my next short story good read: The Mammoth Book of SF Stories by Women.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Yuzuru I.

    Not only these are not the best time travel stories of the 20th century... ...some are the worst stories that I have read of the particular authors (larry niven, charles sheffield) ...they don´t even are representative the field of time travel (none about the grandpa´s paradox for isntance, but two about dinossaurs - at least they are good stories) ...several stories are not about time travel, but about time something (distortions, etc). At least 5 are meandering and aimlessly. Unfortunately the few Not only these are not the best time travel stories of the 20th century... ...some are the worst stories that I have read of the particular authors (larry niven, charles sheffield) ...they don´t even are representative the field of time travel (none about the grandpa´s paradox for isntance, but two about dinossaurs - at least they are good stories) ...several stories are not about time travel, but about time something (distortions, etc). At least 5 are meandering and aimlessly. Unfortunately the few good stories (like the price of the oranges) I have already read. It is my firm belief that the editor didn´t actually read those stories and collect them based on indications and summaries.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ktmholm

    This anthology of 18 time travel stories covers a broad field, from the perhaps obligatory ‘big game hunter seeking a dinosaur trophy’ to robots, rocket travel, and creases in time. In other words, something for every time travel taste. While I felt bad for “The Man who Came Early,” the American GI whose sudden appearance in Iceland 1000 A.D. didn’t go as well as it might have, I rather enjoyed “The Price of Oranges,” where a caring grandfather repeatedly went back 52 years earlier (through a ho This anthology of 18 time travel stories covers a broad field, from the perhaps obligatory ‘big game hunter seeking a dinosaur trophy’ to robots, rocket travel, and creases in time. In other words, something for every time travel taste. While I felt bad for “The Man who Came Early,” the American GI whose sudden appearance in Iceland 1000 A.D. didn’t go as well as it might have, I rather enjoyed “The Price of Oranges,” where a caring grandfather repeatedly went back 52 years earlier (through a hole between the suits in his closet) in order to show his jaded granddaughter that sweetness in romance can, indeed, still exist. A few stories left me largely uninterested, but for the most part, I enjoyed the variety.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Beagley

    Great for fans of the genre, I guess, but most of these stories have not held up well. The best were Rafferty’s “Rainbird”, Nancy Kress’s “The Price of Oranges”, and Ursula K. Le Guin’s “A Fisherman of the Inland Sea”. Neat stuff. Le Guin manages so much. Other stories were certainly serviceable or interesting, and there are no absolute duds in the book, but I won’t return years from now and read any of these again.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne Scanlan

    An uneven anthology. Some of the stories are worth reading again and again (Clarke and LeGuin, of course, and Willis and Kress to name a few), while others are easily forgotten. But the good ones are well worth this time and effort.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    There are a few really strong entries in this collection, but its mostly pretty bad. It doesn't even include the two great Heinlein stories "All You Zombies" or "By His Bootstraps", so I wonder how many other great time travel stories I may have never heard of were overlooked.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Barney

    An interesting read overall. Would i recommend it? Hmm ... not as a whole, but maybe certain short stories.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mathew Englander

    My favourite of these stories was the one by Poul Anderson set in Iceland.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Frazer

    I had read most of these already, but was happy to travel back in time rereading g them.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Donald

    I always loved History, so anything where History is different I love

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mark Pearce

    Although I enjoy time travel stories generally, this was for me a disappointing collection on the whole.

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