counter create hit The Mystery of the Moaning Cave - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Mystery of the Moaning Cave

Availability: Ready to download

Many years ago, the young bandit El Diablo disappeared into a cave, never to be seen again. Now an eerie moaning sound is coming from his old hideout, and the ranchers who live nearby think he may still be alive. The Three Investigators set out to explore the moaning cave—and soon wish they had come armed with more than a flashlight!


Compare

Many years ago, the young bandit El Diablo disappeared into a cave, never to be seen again. Now an eerie moaning sound is coming from his old hideout, and the ranchers who live nearby think he may still be alive. The Three Investigators set out to explore the moaning cave—and soon wish they had come armed with more than a flashlight!

30 review for The Mystery of the Moaning Cave

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nandakishore Mridula

    My first ever "Three Investigators" mystery - and I fell in love with the team. (Ironically, I had originally thought that Hitchcock wrote these mysteries, which is why I bought them! I was disabused only very late, several novels into the series.) Pete Crenshaw, the active sportsman and the muscles of the team: the quiet and studious Bob Andrews, the knowledge bank of the team: and Jupiter Jones, the fat leader who contrived to look stupid, the brain of the team. I especially loved Jupiter, lik My first ever "Three Investigators" mystery - and I fell in love with the team. (Ironically, I had originally thought that Hitchcock wrote these mysteries, which is why I bought them! I was disabused only very late, several novels into the series.) Pete Crenshaw, the active sportsman and the muscles of the team: the quiet and studious Bob Andrews, the knowledge bank of the team: and Jupiter Jones, the fat leader who contrived to look stupid, the brain of the team. I especially loved Jupiter, like I loved Fatty of the Five Find-outers, because of the physical resemblance to teenage me. I do not remember much about the story other than the ghost of a dead Mexican bandido; but I remember that the mystery was quite complicated and much more satisfying than the ones produced by Enid Blyton, which I had started to find simplistic by then.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I love this series! Another great mystery starring the teenage sleuths. In this one, we find the boys at a ranch trying to find out what's been scaring all the ranch hands away. I was shocked we didn't see another boy their own age around, as that has been a staple of the series, but this time it was mostly just the main three. I will say the ending was slightly predictable, as I had figured out who the real bad guy was fairly early. That being said, there were still several twists and turns in t I love this series! Another great mystery starring the teenage sleuths. In this one, we find the boys at a ranch trying to find out what's been scaring all the ranch hands away. I was shocked we didn't see another boy their own age around, as that has been a staple of the series, but this time it was mostly just the main three. I will say the ending was slightly predictable, as I had figured out who the real bad guy was fairly early. That being said, there were still several twists and turns in the story and I was still surprised at some of the happenings. Overall, another good volume!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    An old cave, rumoured to be the resting place of a famed bandit called El Diablo, has suddenly begun to moan and no-one knows why. There by accident - Pete’s dad knows the ranch owners - the boys decide to investigate and came up against legends of the Old One, a scar-faced mystery man, two old prospectors and a gripping mystery. The first non-Arthur book (he gets the credit, William Arden wrote it), this is well-written, clever and full of atmosphere - well worth a read. 2013 re-read - My 2009 r An old cave, rumoured to be the resting place of a famed bandit called El Diablo, has suddenly begun to moan and no-one knows why. There by accident - Pete’s dad knows the ranch owners - the boys decide to investigate and came up against legends of the Old One, a scar-faced mystery man, two old prospectors and a gripping mystery. The first non-Arthur book (he gets the credit, William Arden wrote it), this is well-written, clever and full of atmosphere - well worth a read. 2013 re-read - My 2009 review stands but I’d just add that Arden makes great use of locations, especially Moaning Valley and Santa Carla (an invention of Arden’s, though the name was re-used in “The Lost Boys”) and actual historic figures - Father Junípero Serra and John C. Fremont - add to the authenticity. Good fun, with a terrific atmosphere and great pace, this is a cracking read. 2018 re-read - A cracking read, great pace, some nice interplay between the lads and a great sense of location.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Satish Sridharan

    The first novel I ever read! A lot of kids/teens started with the Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew stuff but I always felt The Three Investigators series was more interesting.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    2009 review - An old cave, rumoured to be the resting place of a famed bandit called El Diablo, has suddenly begun to moan and no-one knows why. There by accident - Pete’s dad knows the ranch owners - the boys decide to investigate and came up against legends of the Old One, a scar-faced mystery man, two old prospectors and a gripping mystery. The first non-Arthur book (he gets the credit, William Arden wrote it), this is well-written, clever and full of atmosphere - well worth a read. 2013 re-re 2009 review - An old cave, rumoured to be the resting place of a famed bandit called El Diablo, has suddenly begun to moan and no-one knows why. There by accident - Pete’s dad knows the ranch owners - the boys decide to investigate and came up against legends of the Old One, a scar-faced mystery man, two old prospectors and a gripping mystery. The first non-Arthur book (he gets the credit, William Arden wrote it), this is well-written, clever and full of atmosphere - well worth a read. 2013 re-read - My 2009 review stands but I’d just add that Arden makes great use of locations, especially Moaning Valley and Santa Carla (an invention of Arden’s, though the name was re-used in “The Lost Boys”) and actual historic figures - Father Junípero Serra and John C. Fremont - add to the authenticity. Good fun, with a terrific atmosphere and great pace, this is a cracking read. 2018 re-read - A cracking read, great pace, some nice interplay between the lads and a great sense of location. 2021 re-read - the more I read this book, the more I like it. A great introduction to Arden’s writing, following on really well from the Arthur legacy, this has great characters, pace and locations. This time around, I decided to google the California channel islands and discovered the Chumash Indians had settled on some of them which made me smile, because of the Chumash Hoard in the next Arden book, “The Laughing Shadow”.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike Battaglia

    The book in one sentence: Three, ultra clever teen aged detectives find themselves embroiled in a mystery when a cave near the ranch where they are staying starts to mysteriously moan, scaring off the ranch hands and baffling the boys until they discover a connection to the legendary bandit El Diablo, making them determined to prove that it isn’t his ghost that is moaning from deep within the cave. Opinion: It’s no mystery that these are the books that woke up the writer in me. Even now, when I r The book in one sentence: Three, ultra clever teen aged detectives find themselves embroiled in a mystery when a cave near the ranch where they are staying starts to mysteriously moan, scaring off the ranch hands and baffling the boys until they discover a connection to the legendary bandit El Diablo, making them determined to prove that it isn’t his ghost that is moaning from deep within the cave. Opinion: It’s no mystery that these are the books that woke up the writer in me. Even now, when I re-read them, I still feel that thrill. It’s been long enough that I don’t remember the solutions to the mysteries, making them fun all over again. The books do follow a fomula, but it’s really no different than episodes of your favorite television series. Something about the innocent, dogged determination of the young detectives to solve a riddle, solve a mystery, investigate, question; their ingenuity and their resourcefulness, the fact that they are not immune to being afraid. It is these qualities that made this series such a quintessential influence on me. Their office is in an old caravan buried under junk in a relative’s junk yard, with secret entrances to get inside, and the dynamics between the three boys works on every level because one is the brains, one is the muscle, and one is the researcher. Whether Alfred Hitchcock actually had anything to do with the writing of the books is not known, but his presence in the books aids the suspension of disbelief. They read like a very early version of the X-Files, with a dash of Scooby Doo-style unmasking, and no small amount of gene-splicing from the old Hardy Boys Mysteries. There were forty two books in the series that I know of, and I treasured all of them like friends so my nostalgia no doubt makes me very bias, but they don’t publish forty two books in a series if the books aren’t popular. Find one for a few bucks at your nearest used books shop and remember what it’s like to be young and full of adventure again.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amit Sareen

    The story here relates to an eerie moaning sound coming from a cave and some recent accidents happening in and around the ranch located near this cave. Some age-old myths and legends which need to be uncovered with logical reasoning and investigation are where these young lads (Jupiter, Pete, and Bob - The Trio) land, always looking for trouble. A thrilling story with characters full of eerieness and suspicion makes it an exciting read till the last page. How Jupe/Jupiter deduces and reaches fin The story here relates to an eerie moaning sound coming from a cave and some recent accidents happening in and around the ranch located near this cave. Some age-old myths and legends which need to be uncovered with logical reasoning and investigation are where these young lads (Jupiter, Pete, and Bob - The Trio) land, always looking for trouble. A thrilling story with characters full of eerieness and suspicion makes it an exciting read till the last page. How Jupe/Jupiter deduces and reaches final conclusions to unravel the mysteries is always a treat to read. Well, if you've read any book of the series, you know what to expect. The mystery starts from page one without any delay. The part I love about this series is its quick pace, no-nonsense emotional turnarounds, and it being an easy-breezy quick read for teenagers, as well as adults. It's so full of the story part that you just can't put it down. It's always been a pleasure reading the Three Investigators. I've read most of them as a kid and after trying to find them for so long, to read again, I managed to get my hands on this one from a local library.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Robert Stewart

    This is the very first 3I book I ever read. After 37 years, it's still a firm favourite. The boys go to the Crooked Y ranch, where the cave in Devil's Mountain has started to moan again after 50 years. They come upon a diamond mine, eccentric old prospectors and a 19th century Mexican bandit. This was the first of several books for the series penned by William Arden, but he emulated the original author's style so well that few readers noticed the difference. A very good story. http://fourdecades. This is the very first 3I book I ever read. After 37 years, it's still a firm favourite. The boys go to the Crooked Y ranch, where the cave in Devil's Mountain has started to moan again after 50 years. They come upon a diamond mine, eccentric old prospectors and a 19th century Mexican bandit. This was the first of several books for the series penned by William Arden, but he emulated the original author's style so well that few readers noticed the difference. A very good story. http://fourdecades.blogspot.com.br/20...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Gallagher

    The Three Investigators is exactly what you want out of a teen detective yarn: fast-paced, fun, inventive, and a little bit spooky. The characters are likable and the prose is good. I can't say the mystery in this one was the most interesting I've ever read, but if this series were a TV show then this would be a solid filler episode. The Three Investigators is exactly what you want out of a teen detective yarn: fast-paced, fun, inventive, and a little bit spooky. The characters are likable and the prose is good. I can't say the mystery in this one was the most interesting I've ever read, but if this series were a TV show then this would be a solid filler episode.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I don’t know whether my awareness of the seams made me look for them, or whether they were just that apparent, but it was clear that the author had changed with this book. There were a couple individual character quirks that weren’t quite right, and this felt more like a generic teen mystery than a Three Investigators story. I was really hoping for more about the Great Old One in the ocean cave, but that pretty much never got paid off. The way in which the Great Old One was used broke the frame I don’t know whether my awareness of the seams made me look for them, or whether they were just that apparent, but it was clear that the author had changed with this book. There were a couple individual character quirks that weren’t quite right, and this felt more like a generic teen mystery than a Three Investigators story. I was really hoping for more about the Great Old One in the ocean cave, but that pretty much never got paid off. The way in which the Great Old One was used broke the frame in which these are the actual tales of boys that know Alfred Hitchcock. But instead we have top secret military exercises whose only inclusion in the story does not advance the narrative, does not explain the historical place of the legend, and instead only gives away national secrets.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Raja99

    Why I Reread This Book: I was lucky enough to find a hardcover edition a few weeks back and decided to reread it as a comfort when I and my wife were sick. The Three Investigators was easily my favorite detective series as a kid, and two or three of the books had a huge impact on me. I don't think I read The Mystery of the Moaning Cave until I started collecting the books a few years back. The series was created, and set up, by Robert Arthur. I'd thought he wrote the first ten in the series, but t Why I Reread This Book: I was lucky enough to find a hardcover edition a few weeks back and decided to reread it as a comfort when I and my wife were sick. The Three Investigators was easily my favorite detective series as a kid, and two or three of the books had a huge impact on me. I don't think I read The Mystery of the Moaning Cave until I started collecting the books a few years back. The series was created, and set up, by Robert Arthur. I'd thought he wrote the first ten in the series, but that isn't so; this book is the tenth, and it was written by William Arden. (The 11th was Robert Arthur's last book in the series.) Given that Arden is probably my second-favorite of the authors who wrote T3I books, I was mildly surprised that I didn't like this one very much. Arden doesn't have a very good grasp of the characters yet, and the story is marred by the somewhat far-fetched (if not ridiculous) explanation for the somewhat far-fetched local legend of The Old One. (Finished 2008-11-26 23:24 EST)

  12. 5 out of 5

    David Phipps

    The Three Investigators is a juvenile detective series published in the 60s, 70s, and 80s that spans about 43 books. They feature three teenage boys who mostly investigate paranormal type stuff that they debunk (somewhat like Scooby-Doo) or other abnormal crimes that the police do not handle. They report their cases to Alfred Hitchcock or a fake director depending on which versions you read. Their base of operations is hidden away in the depths of a junkyard and it has multiple hidden entrances. The Three Investigators is a juvenile detective series published in the 60s, 70s, and 80s that spans about 43 books. They feature three teenage boys who mostly investigate paranormal type stuff that they debunk (somewhat like Scooby-Doo) or other abnormal crimes that the police do not handle. They report their cases to Alfred Hitchcock or a fake director depending on which versions you read. Their base of operations is hidden away in the depths of a junkyard and it has multiple hidden entrances. I discovered these books in the library during middle school and promptly read them all. As such, I have a lot of nostalgia for these books. The Mystery of the Moaning Cave is #10 in the series. The boys are visiting a ranch and investigate eerie wailing coming from a nearby cave system. This book was very much like a Scooby-Doo episode. I read an online ebook version of this since most of these books are out of print.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Demian Katz

    This is the first Three Investigators novel written by an author other than series originator Robert Arthur, though stylistically I didn't notice any dramatic differences; the structure and characterizations were handled quite consistently. In terms of content, the book fits comfortably into the series without particularly standing out. The western theme, featuring ranch life, eccentric old prospectors and legends of 19th-century bandits, emphasizes the close relationship between this type of se This is the first Three Investigators novel written by an author other than series originator Robert Arthur, though stylistically I didn't notice any dramatic differences; the structure and characterizations were handled quite consistently. In terms of content, the book fits comfortably into the series without particularly standing out. The western theme, featuring ranch life, eccentric old prospectors and legends of 19th-century bandits, emphasizes the close relationship between this type of series book and the dime novels of the late-19th/early-20th centuries, as does the story's reliance on coincidence and disguise for some of its plotting. Its mildly open-ended handling of a monstrous/supernatural plot element is fun, though also almost completely inconsequential to the rest of the book. In the end, a diverting if somewhat unmemorable entry in the series, worth a read for fans but probably not the best jumping-on point for newcomers.

  14. 5 out of 5

    LobsterQuadrille

    3.5 stars Having read each of the classic Three Investigators books at least once over the years, I don't find myself thinking back to The Mystery of the Moaning Cave as one that stands out much. Of course it's fun to read about good old Jupe, Pete, and Bob again, but this one was a pretty standard adventure, compared to their more complex and unusual mysteries like The Mystery of the Fiery Eye and The Mystery of the Rogues' Reunion. I also still keep mixing up details of this book with those of 3.5 stars Having read each of the classic Three Investigators books at least once over the years, I don't find myself thinking back to The Mystery of the Moaning Cave as one that stands out much. Of course it's fun to read about good old Jupe, Pete, and Bob again, but this one was a pretty standard adventure, compared to their more complex and unusual mysteries like The Mystery of the Fiery Eye and The Mystery of the Rogues' Reunion. I also still keep mixing up details of this book with those of Mystery of the Haunted Mine(not a Three Investigators book), since they have such similar plot elements and I made the mistake of reading both of them around the same time. This installment in the series is a pleasant diversion, but there are definitely better books in the series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Road Worrier

    When I'm reading books about things like ecological catastrophe or financial catastrophe, it is nice to take a break with a quick feel-good Three Investigators book. I assumed this was Robert Arthur too since he did the next book -- but no -- it was credited to William Arden. No wonder it felt different and didn't feel like it was following the usual formula of -- meet some kid their age involved with a mystery -- found a mystery, etc. I must admit I quite enjoyed this one, so I was embarrassed When I'm reading books about things like ecological catastrophe or financial catastrophe, it is nice to take a break with a quick feel-good Three Investigators book. I assumed this was Robert Arthur too since he did the next book -- but no -- it was credited to William Arden. No wonder it felt different and didn't feel like it was following the usual formula of -- meet some kid their age involved with a mystery -- found a mystery, etc. I must admit I quite enjoyed this one, so I was embarrassed that it wasn't the original Mr. Arthur. I vaguely remembered reading Mystery of the Moaning Cave years ago when I was slightly less than the age of the Three Investigators. I liked how the culprits were handled in the end. (The only really weird thing was the appearance of some top-secret men... That came out of nowhere, and had nothing much to do with anything else.)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Two and a half stars really. Not horrible, but it is VERY obvious this is the first one NOT written by Arthur. Jupiter did not speak or act like Jupiter. Pete was Pete, but Bob was a piece of speaking scenery. The plot was the high point and I wonder if Arthur plotted this one, but just didn't write it. {Liz, are you reading this? Do you know?} I am sad that, in my re-read-through, I only have one more (Talking Skull) that was written by Arthur. Hopefully Arden gets better (or Carey is better) a Two and a half stars really. Not horrible, but it is VERY obvious this is the first one NOT written by Arthur. Jupiter did not speak or act like Jupiter. Pete was Pete, but Bob was a piece of speaking scenery. The plot was the high point and I wonder if Arthur plotted this one, but just didn't write it. {Liz, are you reading this? Do you know?} I am sad that, in my re-read-through, I only have one more (Talking Skull) that was written by Arthur. Hopefully Arden gets better (or Carey is better) at character; I don't remember...since after Talking Skull my reading of the series, as a kid, was spotty.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cliff

    The first book in the series to be written by someone other than Robert Arthur. And it turned out fairly well, that is to say, roughly consistent with Arthur's writing style. I did get a sense that "William Arden" has a bit more knowledge of California history outside of Hollywood. But overall, it's a good indication that Arthur turned the series over to appropriate hands. The first book in the series to be written by someone other than Robert Arthur. And it turned out fairly well, that is to say, roughly consistent with Arthur's writing style. I did get a sense that "William Arden" has a bit more knowledge of California history outside of Hollywood. But overall, it's a good indication that Arthur turned the series over to appropriate hands.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joe Stevens

    The first in the series not by Robert Arthur. It is just another kid's mystery book. It reals like a bit of a revisit to other earlier 3I books as the boys have already gone scuba diving, visited a cave and gone to a ranch all of which to repeat here. Arden would leave his mark on the series, but this was a tentative first step. The first in the series not by Robert Arthur. It is just another kid's mystery book. It reals like a bit of a revisit to other earlier 3I books as the boys have already gone scuba diving, visited a cave and gone to a ranch all of which to repeat here. Arden would leave his mark on the series, but this was a tentative first step.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Roger

    No gold-plated chauffeur-driven Rolls Royce, no entering Headquarters through Red Gate Rover or Tunnel Two, no ghost-to-ghost hookup. The boys are on vacation away from Rocky Beach this time. Still a lot of fun.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    A moaning cave, a bandit and a ranch in problems. Another great story

  21. 4 out of 5

    Redwan Hasan

    Even revising it was pretty fun.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ericka

    Reminds me of Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew. The book has aged quite well since it was originally published over 50 years ago. Much more exciting than a video game.

  23. 5 out of 5

    bluebunny80

    Good mystery, good story...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sruti

    One of the best detective books I've read. Absolutely thrilling. The first book I read from this series and cant wait to start the other books. One of the best detective books I've read. Absolutely thrilling. The first book I read from this series and cant wait to start the other books.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Paul Street

    The first book in the series by William Arden (Dennis Lynds). Writing style is very reminiscent of Robert Arthur. Plenty of twists and surprises. Arden is off to a good start with this one.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Book collector

    This is a generic review of the series rather than the individual books. A small comment at the end of some reviews will be added. The three investigators series was another, along with the hardy boys, that my father bought for me. Aimed at an age range of around 12 rather than the hardy boys slightly older audience, I enjoyed these more at first before moving onto the hardy boys when I was older. I first read these when I was around 9 and then like the hardy boys kept reading them when i was ol This is a generic review of the series rather than the individual books. A small comment at the end of some reviews will be added. The three investigators series was another, along with the hardy boys, that my father bought for me. Aimed at an age range of around 12 rather than the hardy boys slightly older audience, I enjoyed these more at first before moving onto the hardy boys when I was older. I first read these when I was around 9 and then like the hardy boys kept reading them when i was older. The books are great fun. Good mysteries with a set of good main characters. They are aimed firmly at boys and that of course shows there age. But there is still a lot to be enjoyed here. The books started well and as other authors took over became a little varied in quality at times but on the whole they were good fun to read. By modern standards they are very tame but retain a charm to this day. And are still readable to this day too.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Stephenson

    AH&T3I Update: 10 read, 18 hardbacks to go! For the first time in the series, someone other than Robert Arthur, Jr wrote the story. This time Dennis Lynds, aka William Arden, picked up the pen and created this Three Investigators book. He did well to match the style, personalities, and general tone of Robert Arthur's original characters and story line. Perhaps moving this story away from Rocky Beach to a resort ranch some distance away so that the boys can experience a little mini-vacation helped AH&T3I Update: 10 read, 18 hardbacks to go! For the first time in the series, someone other than Robert Arthur, Jr wrote the story. This time Dennis Lynds, aka William Arden, picked up the pen and created this Three Investigators book. He did well to match the style, personalities, and general tone of Robert Arthur's original characters and story line. Perhaps moving this story away from Rocky Beach to a resort ranch some distance away so that the boys can experience a little mini-vacation helped make the writer transition a little easier. The story was exciting and it moved along at a very good pace. Almost all of the loose ends were tied up by the end. However, I would have liked to know why the US Navy was involved in the story at all. That aspect seemed unnecessary and totally unrelated. Still, there was enough mystery and misdirection for any adolescent mystery reader. The boys had to do a mix of stuff ranging from action-adventure activities like exploring a cave and doing some scuba diving to just plain old "Sherlock Holmes style" deduction to figure out all of the twists and turns of the final solution to the case. Lynds proved to be almost as good, if not just as good, as Robert Arthur when describing a Three Investigators case. With only one more Robert Arthur title in the series yet for me to read, the smooth transition to Lynds is a comforting one for it signals that the series moves into the capable hands of another good writer. Another three cheers for the Three Investigators! On to the next case!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    Fans of The Lost Boys will recognize the city of Santa Carla in this 1968 young adult thriller by William Arden. For readers who know California, Santa Carla is roughly Santa Cruz with a little bit of Santa Clara thrown in. In The Mystery of the Moaning Cave, the three investigators decide to solve the mystery behind a recently moaning cave rumored to be the resting place of El Diablo, a Zorro-like figure. The cave sits on the property of the Crooked-Y Ranch. The three investigators use a number Fans of The Lost Boys will recognize the city of Santa Carla in this 1968 young adult thriller by William Arden. For readers who know California, Santa Carla is roughly Santa Cruz with a little bit of Santa Clara thrown in. In The Mystery of the Moaning Cave, the three investigators decide to solve the mystery behind a recently moaning cave rumored to be the resting place of El Diablo, a Zorro-like figure. The cave sits on the property of the Crooked-Y Ranch. The three investigators use a number of clever approaches to track down the source of the moaning. The story is fast paced and entertaining. The mystery is complex enough to keep older readers engrossed and straightforward enough to keep the younger readers turning the pages too. This book is the first of the three investigators books I've read. I enjoyed it enough to want to read more in the series if I find them.

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

    The first book of the series not written by Robert Arthur, it's a decent mystery and story with some downsides. The boys are suddenly scuba diving and horse riding experts? This really bothered me, especially the scuba diving part. In the books by Robert Arthur the boys were much more believable as average adolescents who were great at solving mysteries. The whole thing with the navy was another unnecessary, unbelievable part of the story. The mystery itself was pretty decent and while parts of i The first book of the series not written by Robert Arthur, it's a decent mystery and story with some downsides. The boys are suddenly scuba diving and horse riding experts? This really bothered me, especially the scuba diving part. In the books by Robert Arthur the boys were much more believable as average adolescents who were great at solving mysteries. The whole thing with the navy was another unnecessary, unbelievable part of the story. The mystery itself was pretty decent and while parts of it were expected, there was a twist that I didn't expect that I thought was good. If it weren't for the scuba thing, this book would get 4 stars, instead 3.5.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gardavson

    I don't know why these books never "made it" bigger than they did. I sure enjoyed them as a child. The mysteries seemed...reachable somehow to me. Like they were something that if I had been part of the team, I could have contributed to solving them. And yet they weren't boringly predictable (at least at my then younger age). I'm considering collecting these now as an adult in hopes that my kids may become interested in them. -And I guess because I'm sentimentally geeky that way about the books I don't know why these books never "made it" bigger than they did. I sure enjoyed them as a child. The mysteries seemed...reachable somehow to me. Like they were something that if I had been part of the team, I could have contributed to solving them. And yet they weren't boringly predictable (at least at my then younger age). I'm considering collecting these now as an adult in hopes that my kids may become interested in them. -And I guess because I'm sentimentally geeky that way about the books of my childhood.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.