counter create hit The South Lawn Plot - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The South Lawn Plot

Availability: Ready to download

Nick Bailey considers himself a hardboiled reporter for London's hungriest tabloid. But even Bailey is left reaching for answers when he gets a midnight assignment to investigate a body hanging from the infamous Blackfriars Bridge. Someone, it seems, is killing priests, and a mystery that will serve up much more than headlines is the latest twist in a deadly conspiracy, on Nick Bailey considers himself a hardboiled reporter for London's hungriest tabloid. But even Bailey is left reaching for answers when he gets a midnight assignment to investigate a body hanging from the infamous Blackfriars Bridge. Someone, it seems, is killing priests, and a mystery that will serve up much more than headlines is the latest twist in a deadly conspiracy, one centuries in the making, a plot that will reach all the way to the South Lawn of the White House. In this tale of intrigue and bitter religious rivalry, Ray O'Hanlon sets a conflict that has simmered for four hundred years on a collision course with an American President and a British Prime Minster who are battling a present day crisis that threatens global peace. Both are confronting an uncertain future. But it's what is coming at them from the distant past that poses the greatest danger, a threat to their very lives.


Compare

Nick Bailey considers himself a hardboiled reporter for London's hungriest tabloid. But even Bailey is left reaching for answers when he gets a midnight assignment to investigate a body hanging from the infamous Blackfriars Bridge. Someone, it seems, is killing priests, and a mystery that will serve up much more than headlines is the latest twist in a deadly conspiracy, on Nick Bailey considers himself a hardboiled reporter for London's hungriest tabloid. But even Bailey is left reaching for answers when he gets a midnight assignment to investigate a body hanging from the infamous Blackfriars Bridge. Someone, it seems, is killing priests, and a mystery that will serve up much more than headlines is the latest twist in a deadly conspiracy, one centuries in the making, a plot that will reach all the way to the South Lawn of the White House. In this tale of intrigue and bitter religious rivalry, Ray O'Hanlon sets a conflict that has simmered for four hundred years on a collision course with an American President and a British Prime Minster who are battling a present day crisis that threatens global peace. Both are confronting an uncertain future. But it's what is coming at them from the distant past that poses the greatest danger, a threat to their very lives.

36 review for The South Lawn Plot

  1. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    DNF @ 31% (no rating forthcoming). It is rare for me not to finish a novel, as I am a stubborn reader, ready to make a scathing comment when needed. However, with this piece, where I might put it aside and try later, I do not have that luxury. This was a library loan that cannot be renewed and comes from abroad, so I’lol ship it back with a feeling of good riddance. O’Hanlon’s piece is like shards of dull glass, rounded to the point that they do not fit together. The suicide of a Catholic priest s DNF @ 31% (no rating forthcoming). It is rare for me not to finish a novel, as I am a stubborn reader, ready to make a scathing comment when needed. However, with this piece, where I might put it aside and try later, I do not have that luxury. This was a library loan that cannot be renewed and comes from abroad, so I’lol ship it back with a feeling of good riddance. O’Hanlon’s piece is like shards of dull glass, rounded to the point that they do not fit together. The suicide of a Catholic priest seems to have the newspaper community in London chattering, though little movement is made in the book. There is a sub-plot in or around Ireland, an IRA type event that is in the planning... oh and we have some 17th century flashback that really makes little sense to me. By 30%, you ought to have some idea what is going on, but I am not there. The chapters read easily... there’s always that! And yes, I agree this review of a DNF is scattered and all over the place. But, if a book is as out of order, should not the review be as well? Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Horney

    interesting but very convoluted plot. i seriously recommend making a list of characters and their occupations as you go along--it'll help keep things straight. lots of loose ends, i'm assuming he plans a sequel at some point interesting but very convoluted plot. i seriously recommend making a list of characters and their occupations as you go along--it'll help keep things straight. lots of loose ends, i'm assuming he plans a sequel at some point

  3. 5 out of 5

    J

    Remember, one reader's simple book-flap summary may be another reader's dastardly spoiler. I read this book -- which hinges on the fear of Taiwan being "betrayed" by other nations to promote their business relationships with mainland China -- just at a time when U.S. President-elect Donald Trump broke diplomatic protocol and aroused a news frenzy by taking a congratulatory phone call from the Taiwanese president. But it takes the book a long while to reach a point where it's clear that the two-Chi Remember, one reader's simple book-flap summary may be another reader's dastardly spoiler. I read this book -- which hinges on the fear of Taiwan being "betrayed" by other nations to promote their business relationships with mainland China -- just at a time when U.S. President-elect Donald Trump broke diplomatic protocol and aroused a news frenzy by taking a congratulatory phone call from the Taiwanese president. But it takes the book a long while to reach a point where it's clear that the two-China or one-China policy is a crux. In fact the reader has to go through centuries, dating back to 1600s England, to get to the crux. One story strand involves the roots and consequences of the British switch from the Catholic faith to Church of England Protestantism. Another strand follows a London reporter who gets wind that a series of accidental/suicidal deaths of British priests were homicides. The same reporter gets sent to the U.S. to cover a White House reception at which a Taiwanese businessman will be honored for relocating a business to Ireland. Yet another strand involves an Irish-on-U.S.-soil embassy staffer and an Irish (or British, I forget which) prize-winning photographer, who are both secretly intelligence agents, who must be present at the reception, to be held outdoors on the White House's South Lawn. In reality, I enjoyed the book but consider it to have a lot of muddled plot logic. (Example, it was never clear to me just why the priests had to be killed for events to progress.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Suspense Magazine

    I think you have to call this a thriller, technically. It doesn't quite move like one, but the cast, geography and tangled plot are complex—gigantic even. There's a lot to recommend here as we follow Nick Bailey, a London reporter, into a story that starts out murky and gets deeper and deeper into a real, pea-soup fog. The interwoven plots involve an odd, religious order with roots in the 1600s. The present day priests of that order: a wealthy Taiwanese businessman with a grudge and a terminal il I think you have to call this a thriller, technically. It doesn't quite move like one, but the cast, geography and tangled plot are complex—gigantic even. There's a lot to recommend here as we follow Nick Bailey, a London reporter, into a story that starts out murky and gets deeper and deeper into a real, pea-soup fog. The interwoven plots involve an odd, religious order with roots in the 1600s. The present day priests of that order: a wealthy Taiwanese businessman with a grudge and a terminal illness, a famous photographer who has a much darker sideline occupation, a frustrated, Irish freedom fighter and the top political figure in the world. Their conspiracies snowball. Nothing will stop them except, perhaps, Nick, the intrepid and courageous reporter and a few British police officers who stand in the way. Some American counterparts come into play also as we skip from continent to continent and world-wide war looms if the diplomacy isn't handled exactly right. From the beginning, with dangling suicidal priests, these disparate groups weave a tangled plot whose strands gradually twine together to create a rope of intrigue that may be too strong to be broken. Throw in MI5, MI6 and a few American agencies and you've got a potboiler. A very satisfying read. Reviewed by Kaye George, Author of “Choke”, for Suspense Magazine

  5. 5 out of 5

    James T. Higgins

  6. 4 out of 5

    Maryann Sorese

  7. 4 out of 5

    Katy

  8. 4 out of 5

    Peter Del Re

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  10. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  11. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

  12. 5 out of 5

    Seanandjo

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jon Riley

  15. 5 out of 5

    Oliver

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy Jones

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mickie

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zee Monodee

  19. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

  21. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Meyers

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dana

  25. 4 out of 5

    Leanne Grondin

  26. 5 out of 5

    elle i

  27. 4 out of 5

    Annie Tevis

  28. 4 out of 5

    Galen

  29. 4 out of 5

    DL

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hilary O'connor

  31. 5 out of 5

    Alice

  32. 4 out of 5

    Denise Brennan

  33. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  34. 5 out of 5

    Domenick Micali

  35. 5 out of 5

    James Kiely

  36. 5 out of 5

    Susan

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.