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Puswhisperer: A Year in the Life of an Infectious Disease Doctor

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The Puswhisperer is a collection of blog entries from the first year of Rubor, Dolor, Calor, Tumor. A brief infectious disease case, a clinical pearl and a feeble attempt at humor taken from the daily rounds of an Infectious Disease doctor. And yes, I need an help. Spelling and grammar errors go unseen after numerous reading. But then, as Bones might say, Jim, I'm a doctor, The Puswhisperer is a collection of blog entries from the first year of Rubor, Dolor, Calor, Tumor. A brief infectious disease case, a clinical pearl and a feeble attempt at humor taken from the daily rounds of an Infectious Disease doctor. And yes, I need an help. Spelling and grammar errors go unseen after numerous reading. But then, as Bones might say, Jim, I'm a doctor, not an editor.


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The Puswhisperer is a collection of blog entries from the first year of Rubor, Dolor, Calor, Tumor. A brief infectious disease case, a clinical pearl and a feeble attempt at humor taken from the daily rounds of an Infectious Disease doctor. And yes, I need an help. Spelling and grammar errors go unseen after numerous reading. But then, as Bones might say, Jim, I'm a doctor, The Puswhisperer is a collection of blog entries from the first year of Rubor, Dolor, Calor, Tumor. A brief infectious disease case, a clinical pearl and a feeble attempt at humor taken from the daily rounds of an Infectious Disease doctor. And yes, I need an help. Spelling and grammar errors go unseen after numerous reading. But then, as Bones might say, Jim, I'm a doctor, not an editor.

30 review for Puswhisperer: A Year in the Life of an Infectious Disease Doctor

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I would have liked this book a GREAT deal more if the e-version had been edited ... at all! There were egregious typos and grammar errors that made, occasionally, for absolutely incomprehensible sentences. I also wish that my Kindle had a glossary for many of his acronyms and medical terms. It mostly was silent. That said... Over the past year I've been enjoying reading a variety of medical books for the layperson, and this one was a half-way nod toward civilians. Dr. Crislip also is writing for I would have liked this book a GREAT deal more if the e-version had been edited ... at all! There were egregious typos and grammar errors that made, occasionally, for absolutely incomprehensible sentences. I also wish that my Kindle had a glossary for many of his acronyms and medical terms. It mostly was silent. That said... Over the past year I've been enjoying reading a variety of medical books for the layperson, and this one was a half-way nod toward civilians. Dr. Crislip also is writing for residents and interns, so some of his posts - and this is a series of short mostly daily reports in the life of a busy infectious disease physician - are pretty technical and beyond the ken of us non-medicos. I still got a lot out of his remarks. I know more about endocarditis (vegetation on the heart!), pseudomonas and why it isn't a good idea to get too cozy with domestic animals. My dad was sure right about that....

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Decker

    A couple of peals buried in the entire book. Some entries were aggravating - like the ones where there's a long, drawn out detailed account of the patient's symptoms, then it ends with patient getting better on their own and nobody knows what it was or how they should have dealt with it. I understand that happens in real life, but what a waste of time to read. With several entries like that, and repeated redundancy about his dislike of dogs, propositions in Las Vegas, etc. it's fairly evident th A couple of peals buried in the entire book. Some entries were aggravating - like the ones where there's a long, drawn out detailed account of the patient's symptoms, then it ends with patient getting better on their own and nobody knows what it was or how they should have dealt with it. I understand that happens in real life, but what a waste of time to read. With several entries like that, and repeated redundancy about his dislike of dogs, propositions in Las Vegas, etc. it's fairly evident that there either wasn't an editor or they fell asleep on the job and didn't cull anything.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    It took me a while to get through this one. It's a series of well-written articles that apparently the author, Crislip, writes for Medscape (now). He's an infectious disease doctor who is super opinionated, and very wry sense of humor. I came on these by accident, when I was looking into books on microbiology, which I'm teaching to nurses. His articles are most often on his cases, and diagnosing infectious disease, why people get sick from these diseases, and a few diatribes against stupidity wh It took me a while to get through this one. It's a series of well-written articles that apparently the author, Crislip, writes for Medscape (now). He's an infectious disease doctor who is super opinionated, and very wry sense of humor. I came on these by accident, when I was looking into books on microbiology, which I'm teaching to nurses. His articles are most often on his cases, and diagnosing infectious disease, why people get sick from these diseases, and a few diatribes against stupidity which I loved. For anyone who wants to read interesting articles about microbiology/epidemiology and learn something, this definitely was the way to go. I have seen he's written more since then, and I'd really like to read what he's written since then. I love his sense of humor, and I agree with a lot about what he says concerning people not getting vaccinated. As we are currently seeing with outbreaks of whooping cough and measles, the people not getting the vaccines are putting a lot of other people, including infants at risk.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Bigley

    Being a student studying to be in the medical field as well as a lover of all things weird, gross and nerdy, I loved reading this collection of blog postings. If you know a lot about Infection Control then you will love this because you will understand the significance of all the various diseases. As someone who doesn't know very much about infectious disease, I was still able to understand much of what Dr. Crislip was saying and I enjoyed reading about various cases and the people involved. Crisli Being a student studying to be in the medical field as well as a lover of all things weird, gross and nerdy, I loved reading this collection of blog postings. If you know a lot about Infection Control then you will love this because you will understand the significance of all the various diseases. As someone who doesn't know very much about infectious disease, I was still able to understand much of what Dr. Crislip was saying and I enjoyed reading about various cases and the people involved. Crislip delivered important and interesting information in humorous ways. While some of the jokes were repeated a lot, I still enjoyed them and they flowed with his writing style. Overall, an interesting read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Trixie Jack

    The ONLY reason this book doesn't get five stars is that in the version I read (Kindle ebook), there were enough grammar and spelling errors to detract from my ability to enjoy what I was reading at times (honestly, I started to use my Kindle's note-taking and highlighting features to edit the thing, like a high school English teacher with a red pen). However, if you're not an anal-retentive obsessive word nerd like myself, you'll probably love this book to death. Literally, to death. Because EVE The ONLY reason this book doesn't get five stars is that in the version I read (Kindle ebook), there were enough grammar and spelling errors to detract from my ability to enjoy what I was reading at times (honestly, I started to use my Kindle's note-taking and highlighting features to edit the thing, like a high school English teacher with a red pen). However, if you're not an anal-retentive obsessive word nerd like myself, you'll probably love this book to death. Literally, to death. Because EVERYTHING in this book can kill you, including the humor. Buy it, rent it, borrow it. Just read it. It's amazing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Desiree Pritchard

    Can definately tell that this book has not been edited. I found about 8 typos and realizing that this book came from blogs, it lacked fluidity. I think that this would be much better if it flowed better from one chapter to the next. I am also curious as to whom this book is intended. If it is meant for those in the medical field, I feel that the content is appropriate. This is what I am guessing as it began as a blog, therefore, those with medical interest would probably find it the most facinat Can definately tell that this book has not been edited. I found about 8 typos and realizing that this book came from blogs, it lacked fluidity. I think that this would be much better if it flowed better from one chapter to the next. I am also curious as to whom this book is intended. If it is meant for those in the medical field, I feel that the content is appropriate. This is what I am guessing as it began as a blog, therefore, those with medical interest would probably find it the most facinating... thus, following it. On the other hand, if this is meant for the population at large, I think that some of the studies used may be a little much to decipher.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lady Brainsample

    Abandoned at 15%. Well, I've discovered that one of my worst pet peeves is blog authors who do almost NOTHING to turn their blog into a book. This book will be interesting for people who already have a moderate/advanced knowledge of the subject matter, but not for the layperson like me who was hoping to at least get an intro and some fundamentals before being tossed into the world of difficult-to-pronounce infectious diseases.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Diane Henry

    I love Crislip's blog posts, and this book is a compilation of a year's worth. Doesn't translate well as things that are okay in a daily blog are not quite okay in book format: all the typos, for example or the same joke repeated multiple times. Still and all, there is a lot of fascinating information in here for the health care worker and I bookmarked multiple pages, something I never do otherwise.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    This is a collection of blog posts, so I think the tome could use an editor to bring the narrative together and eliminate typo's. Content wise, I thought it was a great, occasionally quite funny look into a day in the life of a ID doc. Loved that the entries are linked to various studies according to references.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    I am not a MD, but am immensely fascinated with any type of infectious disease (parasites, virus, bacteria, etc.). Dr. Crislip is an amazing author and MD. I wish I could go back in time, change my major at University, and study with Dr. Crislip. Brilliant man. Brilliant author. Pretty damn funny too! If you read this Dr. Crislip, you have a new admirer. :)

  11. 4 out of 5

    William

    This is a book thrown together from a year of blog posts by an Infectious disease doctor in the north west. I is funny and informative but where is the editor. Spelling and grammar are horrible. I liked the fact that it has links to research pages and occasionally humorous odds and ends. Read if you enjoy medical case studies.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Well this was fun, and the price was right ($0.99)! Just the right sort of collection of snippets to read on the train or bus while Melbourne's commuting classes cough and snuffle around you. Note to self: not the right sort of thing to read aloud to the hypochondriac in your life.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Bottoms

    in terms of interest, this book was at the top of the bunch. However, the typos, grammatical errors, words left out, etc made the reading extremely difficult. if this hadn't been on my Kindle, the book would have been marked up with corrections!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marna

    Although I won't pretend that I understood all of it (and there was a LOT of it)....a fair number of acronyms.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Martha Stroud-Merry

    loved it, not his humor which is lame, but the case studies are so interesting...learned so things as well.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Terry Southard

    Interesting. Too over my head with the medicine. He really writes for doctors, not laypeople. I knew that going in, so I got what I could, left the rest.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  18. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Zaharevitz

  19. 4 out of 5

    Anna Amrit

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alison

  21. 4 out of 5

    SibylM

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emily Nestle

  23. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sattva

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erica

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Pullman

  27. 4 out of 5

    Donovan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Gull

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