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The Children of Cherry Tree Farm

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"We're off to Cherry-Tree Farm! We're going to go wild!" the children shout as their train pulls out of London. So of course when Uncle Tim tells them about Tammylan, the wild man who lives out of doors and knows all about the animals and birds, they decide to look for him. Once they meet him all sorts of wonderful things start to happen, for Tammylan introduces the childre "We're off to Cherry-Tree Farm! We're going to go wild!" the children shout as their train pulls out of London. So of course when Uncle Tim tells them about Tammylan, the wild man who lives out of doors and knows all about the animals and birds, they decide to look for him. Once they meet him all sorts of wonderful things start to happen, for Tammylan introduces the children to his animal friends, and soon the ways of badgers and squirrels, rabbits and frogs, moles, otters and snakes are familiar to them, and London seems far away and unreal.


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"We're off to Cherry-Tree Farm! We're going to go wild!" the children shout as their train pulls out of London. So of course when Uncle Tim tells them about Tammylan, the wild man who lives out of doors and knows all about the animals and birds, they decide to look for him. Once they meet him all sorts of wonderful things start to happen, for Tammylan introduces the childre "We're off to Cherry-Tree Farm! We're going to go wild!" the children shout as their train pulls out of London. So of course when Uncle Tim tells them about Tammylan, the wild man who lives out of doors and knows all about the animals and birds, they decide to look for him. Once they meet him all sorts of wonderful things start to happen, for Tammylan introduces the children to his animal friends, and soon the ways of badgers and squirrels, rabbits and frogs, moles, otters and snakes are familiar to them, and London seems far away and unreal.

30 review for The Children of Cherry Tree Farm

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    I've had this book for years... actually it first belonged to an older cousin of mine who lives out west in Alberta, and he gave it to my sister and I along with numerous other books back during the Obama election. Never got around to reading it until now, but every time I see the cover all I can think of are the Obama ads making their way as far as Canada, never airing here yet popping up on the internet constantly. The Children of Cherry Tree Farm is a book I wish I had read a lot sooner, beca I've had this book for years... actually it first belonged to an older cousin of mine who lives out west in Alberta, and he gave it to my sister and I along with numerous other books back during the Obama election. Never got around to reading it until now, but every time I see the cover all I can think of are the Obama ads making their way as far as Canada, never airing here yet popping up on the internet constantly. The Children of Cherry Tree Farm is a book I wish I had read a lot sooner, because I really think I'd have appreciated it better when I was younger. It seems a little silly now and definitely far-fetched, not to mention dated (in this day and age what responsible parent/guardian allows their children to wander off into the woods for a few days and nights with some hermit who nobody knows!?) but I think if I were still a kid I would better appreciate the magic of the story and its appeal to nature. The story follows some children who are spending time vacationing at a farm far outside the city of London with their aunt and uncle. Uncle Tim shares with them the story of Tammylan, a "wild man" who fills the role of almost a sort of wise and kind teacher, sharing the joy and observations to be discovered with plants and animals in the forest. The children themselves are written much like real children, and don't seem fake in any way. Like real kids, they're not perfect angels but they're still a family and they have a strong sense of friendship throughout the story, which is nice to see considering how many kids just isolate themselves in front of cell phones these days. While the story seems like from the era it was originally published in it may have made more sense, I'm not so sure most kids these days would get it, or they might get it only from the perspective that it's some sort of fantasy novel. It does however highlight some of the sacrifices we've made in the name of urbanization and modernity. Even back in the early 2000's when I was a kid, I still went out to the woods surrounding my house to pick berries and go up into the trees, watching birds and squirrels and stuff. I wonder if even in the digital age these old pastimes will still hold strong and stay timeless.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Zily

    I've read this a thousand times when I was younger and always has a special place in my heart. Reading it again after all these years reminded me why I fell in love with Enid Blyton's writing and brought back fond memories of trying to reenact the story by myself. I'll read this to my children in the future and hope they'll love this as much as me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Devenish

    It was really good because the children got to meet Tammylan.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kirsti

    This book is almost always sitting on the side of my Goodreads wall as my current recommendation; little does Goodreads know that I've read it many, many times as a child. I simply haven't read it since joining the site, and hadn't added it either. So I decided to give it another quick read this morning, quick because all Enid Blyton books are a quick read. They are simple, and charming for their simplicity. Reading this at the age of 29 I have to laugh at the almost absurd idea that in today's This book is almost always sitting on the side of my Goodreads wall as my current recommendation; little does Goodreads know that I've read it many, many times as a child. I simply haven't read it since joining the site, and hadn't added it either. So I decided to give it another quick read this morning, quick because all Enid Blyton books are a quick read. They are simple, and charming for their simplicity. Reading this at the age of 29 I have to laugh at the almost absurd idea that in today's world parents/guardians would allow their children to spend days and nights in the woods with a 'wild' man who shuns society. Mmmm. Totally going to happen. But that is the core message of this book, that Tammylan shows the children the joys of the country so they don't have to go back to horrid London at the end, and spawns two more books in this series. Everything in the country is better, the work and the play and they don't want to go back. Although dated in the sense that you probably don't want to give your children a book that makes them think there are wild men in the woods waiting to gift them a baby squirrel, there is still the good old Enid charm here. Children without supervision, trusted and hardworking. Learning manners and honesty, and how to be kind to one another and animals, and that's no bad thing. Producing and eating your own food, family units, all the good stuff. Now, Goodreads, move on and start offering me a new suggestion, I've marked this one as read! Four stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kayleigh Brindley

    I've been reading this every night to my nature-obsessed five-year-old who honestly cried when we got to the end. She's thrilled to find out that there's a sequel!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I want to make it clear that I enjoyed this book, and I wish all kids today had the interest in and opportunity to experience the woods the way the four siblings in this book did. That said... oh, my, have things changed since 1940. Let's talk about the Wild Man. First of all, the cover art of the edition I've chosen to append this review to is hilarious. So, this wild man wears a suit, and keeps his beard nicely trimmed. Perhaps his woodland friends gnaw it off and use the hair to line their nes I want to make it clear that I enjoyed this book, and I wish all kids today had the interest in and opportunity to experience the woods the way the four siblings in this book did. That said... oh, my, have things changed since 1940. Let's talk about the Wild Man. First of all, the cover art of the edition I've chosen to append this review to is hilarious. So, this wild man wears a suit, and keeps his beard nicely trimmed. Perhaps his woodland friends gnaw it off and use the hair to line their nests. At least he's not wearing a bowler and carrying a black umbrella hooked over one arm. He looks a bit like the original Jonny Quest's dad. “Auntie, may I go to the woods and spend the night with my friend the Wild Man in his tree house?” “Of course, dear. Take him a piece of cake.” There's a conversation that doesn't happen any more. The Wild Man, of course, is the most civilized person in the book, and I'm sure that was the entire point. But we don't even get a hint of back story to reassure us that the story isn't going to take a sudden turn into Stephen King territory. Not that Enid would ever go there, but it's nearly impossible for a 21st century first-time reader not to conjure those kinds of visions. I think Tammylan's name should be in the title of the book. We barely hear about the farm, other than as the place the kids go back to after visiting Tammylan in the woods, and the place where they talk about wanting to go back and visit him again. Let's promote him from Wild Man, and call it Tammylan the Wise and the Children of Cherry Tree Farm.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Ryan

    Yet another three-in-one book, read on my Kindle - the books are "The Children of Cherry Tree Farm", "The Children of Willow Farm" and "More Adventures on Willow Farm". And yet again, a set of books I remember devouring, almost 30 plus years ago! The usual Blyton beginning in "Cherry Tree Farm" with four sickly children (two girls,two boys) who are miserable living in London, when their mother and father get a offer to travel to America. It seems in every Blyton book, America was "the land of op Yet another three-in-one book, read on my Kindle - the books are "The Children of Cherry Tree Farm", "The Children of Willow Farm" and "More Adventures on Willow Farm". And yet again, a set of books I remember devouring, almost 30 plus years ago! The usual Blyton beginning in "Cherry Tree Farm" with four sickly children (two girls,two boys) who are miserable living in London, when their mother and father get a offer to travel to America. It seems in every Blyton book, America was "the land of opportunity". The four children are sent to live in the country with their Aunt and Uncle, and love it, of course. They immediately make friends with a "wild man", Tammylan, who lives in the wild, and knows more about the wild animals than anyone. I think I enjoyed the first book far more than the other two, wild animals of the country are far more interesting than the farm animals. In book two "Willow Farm". the four children and their parents run their very own farm, and you learn more about animals - but this time farm animals - and the work you have to do to have a successful farm. Perhaps "More Adventures on Willow Farm", was a book too far, as it stretched the farming life a little too far. an enjoyable read, however, although the newer generation would probably find it very old-fashioned.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Enid Blyton books are notable for their 'life is perfect and nothing goes wrong that can't be fixed' tales. Sadly this is one of those. While I enjoyed it as a child, even when I was 12 I began to rant about the improbability of the perfection of this world. It's a good book for kids, interesting enough to hold their attention yet sedate enough to ensure they aren't inspired by the book's contents to go forth and perform crimes etc.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    Such a quiet, cosy little book! Simply, the children are sent to live with their aunt and uncle on Cherry Tree farm, and there they meet Tammylan, the "wild man", who teaches them about animals. No rip-roaring adventures - I kept expecting there to be smugglers or poachers hiding in the woods that the children would have to beat, but no! And still, it was a charming, delightful read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rajeswari arun

    the best books ever....children of cherry tree farm and children of willow tree farm!!!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sana

    I was a voracious reader as a child having entire series of "The Baby Sitter's Club", "Sweet Valley Kids", and "Sweet Valley High School", but nothing sparked my imagination like Enid Blyton. There were a few books of hers in circulation in the 1980's Pakistan, and I was probably the only girl (or maybe there was another) who knew about her. I would recommend her to anyone and everyone who liked reading and asked what I was reading. The way her short stories sparked my imagination impacted me mo I was a voracious reader as a child having entire series of "The Baby Sitter's Club", "Sweet Valley Kids", and "Sweet Valley High School", but nothing sparked my imagination like Enid Blyton. There were a few books of hers in circulation in the 1980's Pakistan, and I was probably the only girl (or maybe there was another) who knew about her. I would recommend her to anyone and everyone who liked reading and asked what I was reading. The way her short stories sparked my imagination impacted me more than I let on. They were parables like Disney animated movies in printed words and I would get lost in them for hours until my mother would call me for dinner. I would put Enid Blyton to the level of Roald Dahl and Dr. Suess. Check her out!!

  12. 4 out of 5

    gemsbooknook Geramie Kate Barker

    ‘”We’re off to Cherry-Tree Farm! We’re going to go wild!” the children shout as their train pulls out of London. So of course when Uncle Tim tells them about Tammylan, the wild man who lives out-of-doors and knows all about the animals and birds, they decide to look for him. Once they meet him all sorts of wonderful things start to happen, for Tammylan introduces the children to his animal friends, and soon the ways of badgers and squirrels, rabbits and frogs, moles, otters and snakes are familia ‘”We’re off to Cherry-Tree Farm! We’re going to go wild!” the children shout as their train pulls out of London. So of course when Uncle Tim tells them about Tammylan, the wild man who lives out-of-doors and knows all about the animals and birds, they decide to look for him. Once they meet him all sorts of wonderful things start to happen, for Tammylan introduces the children to his animal friends, and soon the ways of badgers and squirrels, rabbits and frogs, moles, otters and snakes are familiar to them, and London seems far away and unreal.’ This book was beautiful. I have absolutely loved making my way through Enid Blyton’s classics recently, and I was over joyed when I picked this book up and realised I had never read it before. Reading this book for the first time as an adult was a wonderful experience. I was filled with wonder and hope from start to finish. I loved the relationship between the siblings in this book. It was pure and realistic. They argued and squabbled yet they really loved and protected each other. I loved loved the respect and love the children showed their Aunt and Uncle. My favourite thing about this book was getting to see the children grow and build a relationship with Tammylan and the animals. This book really helps the reader to remember not to judge someone because of what other people believe. I truly believe that is something everyone should remember. The writing in this book was perfect, but that shouldnt be a surprise. The lyrical writing and captivating descriptions really added an extra layer to the wonderful story that was unfolding. This is definitely a book that I could read a hundred times and never tire of. The Children Of Cherry Tree Farm by Enid Blyton is a must read for all young readers and all readers who are young at heart. Geramie Kate Barker gemsbooknook.wordpress.com

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anit Singh

    i hate you enid. I was always hungry after reading this book because i didn't find all the things those children ate when I was a kid and then I grew up and things stopped being wonderous and instead started being labelled with calories, diabetes and heartattacks. Don't give this to a kid. Unless there are pastry chefs around

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sreelakshmi

    One of the best children's novel by Enid Blyton. This is the first book of the 3 book series followed by The Children of Willow Farm and More Adventures at Willow Farm. The book revolves around four children learning and enjoying the farm life.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alison Condliffe

    I am not an animal person so this book bored me after awhile. I was impressed that Blyton knew so much about her environment and stressed the importance of conservation. She seems ahead of her time but just not for me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lizzie

    Reread this favourite from my childhood. Turns out I still love it! It feels very English, and I remember as a child loving learning about all the country animals through these children and their wild friend Tammylan!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jaime Owen

    Besides the famous 5, my all-time favourite book growing up. I have read it heaps of times. I have nothing bad to say about it. I loved the adventure of it and can't wait for my sister and brother to read it when they get a bit older.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Atkiss

    It's one of the best Enid Blyton books I've ever read. She's a Fantastic author and is hard to stop reading!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Curtis

    Read over 40 years ago and I still love it!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Francesca Bennett

    I loved this book when I was younger and rereading it now reminds me of those times.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Raniafatima

    I like Penny because she is so adventours

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Rayyan

    Its really interesting I love the book

  23. 5 out of 5

    MrsJLee

    My favourite childhood book that I read over and over again, lovely, sweet, innocent story, making a city girl want to escape to the country!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    * Read for the '2019 PopSugar Reading Challenge' task: A reread of a favorite book

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ishika Paliwal

    This was the first novel I read. So this book pretty much made me a reader! Really good for beginners!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Bond

    Loved it

  27. 5 out of 5

    Susanne Baker

    Loved this book as a child! Such a pleasure to read it again.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Suresh Patel

    One of the my first books ever. I will always love this series by Enid Blyton because the book is based on country life and I dream of such life. I have a farm of my own but due to lack of rains, I couldn't pursue a life there. 4 siblings are made to live for a few months on their Uncle's farm because there parents were out-of-city. Unaware of the experiences they are going to have, they step into the lives of farmers. From domesticated animals to wilds in the jungles, they have fun beyond imagi One of the my first books ever. I will always love this series by Enid Blyton because the book is based on country life and I dream of such life. I have a farm of my own but due to lack of rains, I couldn't pursue a life there. 4 siblings are made to live for a few months on their Uncle's farm because there parents were out-of-city. Unaware of the experiences they are going to have, they step into the lives of farmers. From domesticated animals to wilds in the jungles, they have fun beyond imagination. Loved the series! A must read for children and adults alike.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Coolbeans

    The first I heard of this book and the book series when I was a very young child. My mother would read my sister and I stories before going to bed, sometimes making them up as she went along. One night, the three of us crowded into my younger sisters bed and snuggled up as my mother brought out the new book. Children of Cherry Tree Farm. For the next few nights, we delved into the lives of the four children, Rory, Benjy, Sheila and Penny and their time on their uncle and aunts farm- Cherry Tree The first I heard of this book and the book series when I was a very young child. My mother would read my sister and I stories before going to bed, sometimes making them up as she went along. One night, the three of us crowded into my younger sisters bed and snuggled up as my mother brought out the new book. Children of Cherry Tree Farm. For the next few nights, we delved into the lives of the four children, Rory, Benjy, Sheila and Penny and their time on their uncle and aunts farm- Cherry Tree Farm. unfortunately, my mother was a very busy woman and became unable to continue our little tradition every night. Being the impatient person I am, I couldn't wait for those rare occasions to hear what would happen at the Farm so I picked it up and used my reading skills that I had from reading the little school readers in my class (I was in prep at the time) and made my way through the rest of the book and Children of Cherry Tree farm became the first ever proper chapter book that I read and long story short, started off my absolute love of reading and writing. It is a gorgeous little book that I suggest anyone of any age to read. It is amazingly written and easy to understand and follow on with. This book has helped define my dreams and hobbies and opened up beautiful ways of seeing things and enjoying life.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mehmet

    When i was a Teenager i use to read Enid Blyton almost religously. Many time her story helped me escape to a wonderful fantasy world of adventure and fun. If i was sad or troubled reading her storys helped remove the pain. It also was part of what encouraged me to read. I read this book just for a little return to my youth. Wow she knew how to tune into a childs mind, i enjoyed this read and read it quickly and enjoyed my little time travel to by gone times. On a side note i notice that a lot of When i was a Teenager i use to read Enid Blyton almost religously. Many time her story helped me escape to a wonderful fantasy world of adventure and fun. If i was sad or troubled reading her storys helped remove the pain. It also was part of what encouraged me to read. I read this book just for a little return to my youth. Wow she knew how to tune into a childs mind, i enjoyed this read and read it quickly and enjoyed my little time travel to by gone times. On a side note i notice that a lot of books of her are still released but edited to take away parts that are racist or sexist. This type of censorship is wrong, how is a young child going to learn if not taught to evualate and understand what they read. I use to notice how Enid world was very sterotypically and gender biased, i am not the most intelligent of people but if as a 11 year old i could judge these things i am sure all youngster can understand. So this parts should in my opinion not be censored but discussed. So there is my thought for the day ! So yes good fun and childish fun which teaches you about animals. Just do not believe you could start really mixing and becoming friends with British wildlife, that part is fantasy ;-) he he

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