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Irish People Convicted of Murder: Irish People Convicted of Murdering Police Officers, People from Northern Ireland Convicted of Murder

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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 32. Chapters: Irish people convicted of murdering police officers, People from Northern Ireland convicted of murder, Burke and Hare murders, Scissor Sisters, Paul Magee, Joe Cahill, Seamus McElwaine, Tom Williams, Michael Barrett, Sean O'Ca Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 32. Chapters: Irish people convicted of murdering police officers, People from Northern Ireland convicted of murder, Burke and Hare murders, Scissor Sisters, Paul Magee, Joe Cahill, Seamus McElwaine, Tom Williams, Michael Barrett, Sean O'Callaghan, Charlie Kerins, Nicholas Sheehy, Vere St. Leger Goold, Philip Cross, Martin Cash, Half Hung MacNaghten, Kate Webster, Joseph Wall, John Gordon, Tommy O'Connor, Thomas McMahon, John McCaffary, Thomas Kent, Hugh Doherty, Thomas McDowell, Trevor Hamilton, Willy Brennan, Grace Marks, Liam Quinn, Michael Manning, Colin Howell. Excerpt: The Burke and Hare murders (also known as the West Port murders) were serial murders perpetrated in Edinburgh, Scotland, from November 1827 to 31 October 1828. The killings were attributed to Irish immigrants William Burke and William Hare, who sold the corpses of their 17 victims to provide material for dissection. Their purchaser was Doctor Robert Knox, a private anatomy lecturer whose students were drawn from Edinburgh Medical College. Their accomplices included Burke's mistress, Helen McDougal, and Hare's wife, Margaret Laird. From their infamous method of killing their victims has come the word "burking," meaning to purposefully smother and compress the chest of a victim, and a derived meaning, to quietly suppress. Before 1832, there were insufficient cadavers legitimately available for the study and teaching of anatomy in British medical schools. The University of Edinburgh was an institution universally renowned for medical sciences. As medical science began to flourish in the early 19th century, demand rose sharply, but at the same time, the only legal supply of cadavers-the bodies of executed criminals-had fallen due to a sharp reduction in the execution rate in the early 19th century, brought about by the repeal of the Bloody Code. Only about 2 or 3...


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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 32. Chapters: Irish people convicted of murdering police officers, People from Northern Ireland convicted of murder, Burke and Hare murders, Scissor Sisters, Paul Magee, Joe Cahill, Seamus McElwaine, Tom Williams, Michael Barrett, Sean O'Ca Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 32. Chapters: Irish people convicted of murdering police officers, People from Northern Ireland convicted of murder, Burke and Hare murders, Scissor Sisters, Paul Magee, Joe Cahill, Seamus McElwaine, Tom Williams, Michael Barrett, Sean O'Callaghan, Charlie Kerins, Nicholas Sheehy, Vere St. Leger Goold, Philip Cross, Martin Cash, Half Hung MacNaghten, Kate Webster, Joseph Wall, John Gordon, Tommy O'Connor, Thomas McMahon, John McCaffary, Thomas Kent, Hugh Doherty, Thomas McDowell, Trevor Hamilton, Willy Brennan, Grace Marks, Liam Quinn, Michael Manning, Colin Howell. Excerpt: The Burke and Hare murders (also known as the West Port murders) were serial murders perpetrated in Edinburgh, Scotland, from November 1827 to 31 October 1828. The killings were attributed to Irish immigrants William Burke and William Hare, who sold the corpses of their 17 victims to provide material for dissection. Their purchaser was Doctor Robert Knox, a private anatomy lecturer whose students were drawn from Edinburgh Medical College. Their accomplices included Burke's mistress, Helen McDougal, and Hare's wife, Margaret Laird. From their infamous method of killing their victims has come the word "burking," meaning to purposefully smother and compress the chest of a victim, and a derived meaning, to quietly suppress. Before 1832, there were insufficient cadavers legitimately available for the study and teaching of anatomy in British medical schools. The University of Edinburgh was an institution universally renowned for medical sciences. As medical science began to flourish in the early 19th century, demand rose sharply, but at the same time, the only legal supply of cadavers-the bodies of executed criminals-had fallen due to a sharp reduction in the execution rate in the early 19th century, brought about by the repeal of the Bloody Code. Only about 2 or 3...

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