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The Cost of Rights: Why Liberty Depends on Taxes

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The simple insight that all legally enforceable rights cost money reminds us that freedom is not violated by a government that taxes and spends, but requires it—and requires a citizenry vigilant about how money is allocated. Drawing from these practical, commonsense notions, The Cost of Rights provides a useful corrective to the all-or-nothing feel of much political debate The simple insight that all legally enforceable rights cost money reminds us that freedom is not violated by a government that taxes and spends, but requires it—and requires a citizenry vigilant about how money is allocated. Drawing from these practical, commonsense notions, The Cost of Rights provides a useful corrective to the all-or-nothing feel of much political debate nowadays (The Economist).


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The simple insight that all legally enforceable rights cost money reminds us that freedom is not violated by a government that taxes and spends, but requires it—and requires a citizenry vigilant about how money is allocated. Drawing from these practical, commonsense notions, The Cost of Rights provides a useful corrective to the all-or-nothing feel of much political debate The simple insight that all legally enforceable rights cost money reminds us that freedom is not violated by a government that taxes and spends, but requires it—and requires a citizenry vigilant about how money is allocated. Drawing from these practical, commonsense notions, The Cost of Rights provides a useful corrective to the all-or-nothing feel of much political debate nowadays (The Economist).

30 review for The Cost of Rights: Why Liberty Depends on Taxes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Pollo

    Ahora que muchas personas ingenuas, o simplemente desubicadas, se desgañitan diciendo que "los derechos no se discuten", libros como este nos recuerdan que esa frase es puro floro. Un análisis diferente, un poco repetitivo en su insistencia del costo económico de hacer cumplir los derechos, es decir, de que existan, postura que contrae otras como romper con la dicotomía de derechos negativos y positivos y reafirmar la importancia e inevitabilidad de la intervención estatal y el Estado de Bienest Ahora que muchas personas ingenuas, o simplemente desubicadas, se desgañitan diciendo que "los derechos no se discuten", libros como este nos recuerdan que esa frase es puro floro. Un análisis diferente, un poco repetitivo en su insistencia del costo económico de hacer cumplir los derechos, es decir, de que existan, postura que contrae otras como romper con la dicotomía de derechos negativos y positivos y reafirmar la importancia e inevitabilidad de la intervención estatal y el Estado de Bienestar. Para regalárselo a tu amigo que se cree liberal, a tu amigo progre no, porque no lo entendería.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Fabián Romero Jarrín

    El libro “El costo de los derechos. Por qué la libertad depende de los impuestos” de Stephen Holmes y Cass R. Sunstein nos permite conocer la relación directa entre los impuestos y los derechos a los que acceden o quisieran acceder todos los ciudadanos. Es un libro brillante con frases como: “La muy extendida pero sin duda equivocada premisa de que nuestros derechos más fundamentales esencialmente no tienen costo alguno no puede explicarse por el hecho de que no se hayan podido detectar costos o El libro “El costo de los derechos. Por qué la libertad depende de los impuestos” de Stephen Holmes y Cass R. Sunstein nos permite conocer la relación directa entre los impuestos y los derechos a los que acceden o quisieran acceder todos los ciudadanos. Es un libro brillante con frases como: “La muy extendida pero sin duda equivocada premisa de que nuestros derechos más fundamentales esencialmente no tienen costo alguno no puede explicarse por el hecho de que no se hayan podido detectar costos ocultos” o “Los derechos son costosos porque los remedios los son”, nos dan luces sobre la importancia de esta publicación.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

    At the very least, reading the Cost of Rights will broaden your prespective beyond the narrowly drawn libertarian/liberal/conservative catagories that have become so ingrained in modern American political thought. Many of the points made in the book are such that they seem obvious once you have read them, though you never in a million years would have thought of them yourself. It's true, for example, that the so-called "negative rights" (rights against governmental interferance) are just as much At the very least, reading the Cost of Rights will broaden your prespective beyond the narrowly drawn libertarian/liberal/conservative catagories that have become so ingrained in modern American political thought. Many of the points made in the book are such that they seem obvious once you have read them, though you never in a million years would have thought of them yourself. It's true, for example, that the so-called "negative rights" (rights against governmental interferance) are just as much dependant on governmental enforcement and hence taxpayer dollars as are welfare, medicare, and medicaid. Police forces, court trials, governmental oversight all cost money, and without such well run institutions one's rights are all but nonexistent. It is also the case, though we often forget it, that resources are insufficiant to fund all the rights that people could ever justifiably want or demand. All of this is well and good, but in Holmes and Sunstein's hands, it fails to translate ino a workable agenda for American politics. Having read the book, I feel that I've gained a broader perspective on legal and political issues, but the practical effects of that broader perspective seem to be nil. In the second half of the book, the authors also begin to confuse legal rights with moral rights, leading to some confused argumentation.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I feel like this book started as an essay... and should've stayed an essay. Interesting and useful perspective said in too many pages.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ashish Vyas

    It is an excellent review, somewhat heavily worded, but explain the logic and rationale how functioning democracy work! A MUST READ for basic understanding for fundamental issues of basic rights, liberties and how you get them and don't. It is very fair minded and balanced review that should appeal both to the left and right end of the spectrum.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Made some good points, but unfortunately in an overly technical and legalistic way. It made the core of it's argument at the beginning and got repetitive after that.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Burak Tamaç

    Some arguments are too repetitive but the general argument is compelling.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Enrique Oviedo

    Un excelente análisis de la razón de ser de los impuestos como garantía de los derechos humanos básicos y sociales, enfocado en la economía y la justicia de los Estados Unidos de América. El logro de esta investigación es que vá más halla de las justificaciones evidentes de los tributos (salud, educación), yendo a otros ámbitos (justicia, libre mercado, entre otros).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Soha Bayoumi

    This is a book that I would highly recommend to all libertarians and fiscal conservatives and to all those who insist on affirming the negative/positive rights dichotomy. It shows clearly that even a minimal "nightwatch" state requires a lot of money and that protecting the basic "negative" rights of citizens (police, judiciary, etc.) requires considerable taxation.

  10. 5 out of 5

    sheena d.

    Sucks to think that freedom is not free, but that's what this is about. Maybe.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chase

    Got redundant, but good lens through which to view and evaluate claims on various liberty interests.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marvin chester

    The subtitle of this book is "Why liberty depends on taxes." Something that is not generally appreciated by the public.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Àlex Rosell

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Mican

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alex Schulman

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarahfina

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lobstergirl

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sherri

  24. 5 out of 5

    Wessel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Juliana Chevônica

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ave-Geidi Jallai

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peter Jacobsson

  28. 4 out of 5

    LPenting

  29. 5 out of 5

    Igor

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

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