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"Years ago I exposed myself to the possibility that Judaism might have great truths to offer, and Chever Torah (Jewish Bible study) rewarded my open mind with radical improvements in the way I live and view my Christian faith." -from the Introduction After he spent five years attending Chever Torah, Athol Dickson found his faith radically changed-the result being a deeper "Years ago I exposed myself to the possibility that Judaism might have great truths to offer, and Chever Torah (Jewish Bible study) rewarded my open mind with radical improvements in the way I live and view my Christian faith." -from the Introduction After he spent five years attending Chever Torah, Athol Dickson found his faith radically changed-the result being a deeper relationship with God. In beautiful and simple language, The Gospel according to Moses illustrates Dickson's journey of faith exploring some of the primary theological differences and similarities between Christianity and Judaism. He draws generously on both Old and New Testament scriptures, looking at Christian and Jewish perspectives on topics such as suffering, grace vs. works, and the place of Jesus in the Hebrew Scriptures.


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"Years ago I exposed myself to the possibility that Judaism might have great truths to offer, and Chever Torah (Jewish Bible study) rewarded my open mind with radical improvements in the way I live and view my Christian faith." -from the Introduction After he spent five years attending Chever Torah, Athol Dickson found his faith radically changed-the result being a deeper "Years ago I exposed myself to the possibility that Judaism might have great truths to offer, and Chever Torah (Jewish Bible study) rewarded my open mind with radical improvements in the way I live and view my Christian faith." -from the Introduction After he spent five years attending Chever Torah, Athol Dickson found his faith radically changed-the result being a deeper relationship with God. In beautiful and simple language, The Gospel according to Moses illustrates Dickson's journey of faith exploring some of the primary theological differences and similarities between Christianity and Judaism. He draws generously on both Old and New Testament scriptures, looking at Christian and Jewish perspectives on topics such as suffering, grace vs. works, and the place of Jesus in the Hebrew Scriptures.

30 review for The Gospel According to Moses: What My Jewish Friends Taught Me about Jesus

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul,

    The Gospel According To Moses is a pretty sharp book by a pretty sharp layman. His experience attending a Reformed Jewish temple for 5 years are valuable for all Christians. He does a good job of explaining the Jewish roots of the Christian faith. And his interactions with the Jewish congregation may put faces to a religion that many of us have not had much contact with. Dickson recitation of the church's sins against the Jews, and their quite justified fear of us, is a powerful reminder of the The Gospel According To Moses is a pretty sharp book by a pretty sharp layman. His experience attending a Reformed Jewish temple for 5 years are valuable for all Christians. He does a good job of explaining the Jewish roots of the Christian faith. And his interactions with the Jewish congregation may put faces to a religion that many of us have not had much contact with. Dickson recitation of the church's sins against the Jews, and their quite justified fear of us, is a powerful reminder of the need for humility. I believe that Christians should remember our oppressions at least as much as those whom we have oppressed, and as much as we remember those times in which we have been oppressed (cf. Tortured for Christ) Dickson does a good job, in my opinion, of framing our problems without succumbing to the Manichean, all-or-nothing views of too many people and books these days (think A People's History of the Unites States by Howard Zinn). The church's history is littered with the debris of profound evil (Inquisition) and with the memorials of incredible good (abolition). That bears remembering in all the church's dealings with people outside the faith. Dickson also does a great job of raising questions. He caused me to re-examine some things that I had not thought of, things too fundamental for easy examination. This is a great gift. Unfortunately, Dickson's answers were occasionally over-philosophical and did not always take all the biblical evidence into account. So, for the non-theologian, take heed and check out any radical new beliefs with a pastor/shepherd of the church.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Curtis Hefner

    This is easily the best book I've read in recent memory. It brought new ideas and, more importantly, new questions. The writing style lends itself more to reading than to studying, but the progression of thought should be enough to excite any faith-filled scholar. This is a book which I will recommend for friends and reread for myself. This is easily the best book I've read in recent memory. It brought new ideas and, more importantly, new questions. The writing style lends itself more to reading than to studying, but the progression of thought should be enough to excite any faith-filled scholar. This is a book which I will recommend for friends and reread for myself.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Geoff Glenister

    This book tells the story of one man's journey to understanding Jews as brothers. Athol Dickson began attending Chever Torah (literally "Torah group" - basically a Jewish bible study) five years before writing the book. Dickson makes the book very personal, and it makes it a joy to read - even for someone who is more familiar with the material. I think the most important lesson is summarized in this story: Rabbi Zimmerman is away this Shabbat morning, so Rabbi David Stern leads Chever Torah in hi This book tells the story of one man's journey to understanding Jews as brothers. Athol Dickson began attending Chever Torah (literally "Torah group" - basically a Jewish bible study) five years before writing the book. Dickson makes the book very personal, and it makes it a joy to read - even for someone who is more familiar with the material. I think the most important lesson is summarized in this story: Rabbi Zimmerman is away this Shabbat morning, so Rabbi David Stern leads Chever Torah in his place. Rabbi Stern is young, handsome, and possessed of a lightning quick wit. He wears his hair in the style made famous by J.F.K. His energy is contagious. The morning's discussion accelerates as he asks a question worthy of Rashi, then paces back and forth in front of the hall grinning with delight as we answer and respond with questions of our own. But a few minutes later the rhythm flags inexplicably and we sit silently, staring at our Torahs. Rabbi Stern fires off another question. No one answers. He offers a provocative observation - something controversial to stir the pot. Still, we are silent. Finally, in frustration, he exclaims, "Come on people! Somebody disagree with me! How can we learn anything if no one will disagree?" We laugh. But it occurs to me that Rabbi Stern has offered the most profound observation of the day, and it is a very Jewish idea. Unfortunately, most theological conversations I have had in church have been the self-reinforcing kind: a group of people sitting around telling each other what everyone already believes. If some brave soul interjects a radical new idea or questions one of the group's firmly held views, it is usually an unpleasant experience. We shift in our seats uncomfortably until someone rises to the bait. The discussion remains civil, but it seems that any challenge to the groups' theology must be corrected, so all comments are solidly aimed at that one goal: arriving at a preconceived answer. Chever Torah has no such agenda. Or perhaps I should say all discussions have the same agenda: to explore the possibilities - all the possibilities. So much of Christianity has become authoritarian and discourages critical thinking - to its detriment. It would do so much good for us to learn that questioning is not necessarily a faith killer - it can be something that spurs our faith to new growth. This would be a good book for any Evangelical to read. That being said, I wish Dickson would expand his experiment - why not see what he can learn from other Christian denominations? When he is explaining Christian theology, his ignorance of what other denominations believe shows, and a shallow theology is the result. That being said, I am still convinced that there is much wisdom here that would do many Evangelicals a world of good to find.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jaret

    Interesting book written by an evangelical layman who writes about the 5 years he's been going to Chever Torah. I thought it was honest and had a lot of good insights on how people from both religious groups see and stereotype eachother and eachother's beliefs, and why a lot of them are wrong. Although the author's dream audience would be a mix of Jewish and Christian readers, I'd wager the VAST majority of people who read the book would fall under the second category. Still, a very good read ev Interesting book written by an evangelical layman who writes about the 5 years he's been going to Chever Torah. I thought it was honest and had a lot of good insights on how people from both religious groups see and stereotype eachother and eachother's beliefs, and why a lot of them are wrong. Although the author's dream audience would be a mix of Jewish and Christian readers, I'd wager the VAST majority of people who read the book would fall under the second category. Still, a very good read even if you don't agree with everything the guy put out there (you won't no matter who you are, and that's kinda the point).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Don Schiewer

    I absolutely loved this book...there was a sense of relief that the questions that I've wrestled with in Scripture were "OK"...this book gave me the freedom to question the Text and find that the answers are beautiful, wonderful, and oftentimes elusive![return][return]The questions that Dickson chose to use in his book are fascinating and at times uncomfortable...and then you realize that 'in God' there truly is freedom...freedom to question, to argue, to wrestle...to be in awe...[return][return I absolutely loved this book...there was a sense of relief that the questions that I've wrestled with in Scripture were "OK"...this book gave me the freedom to question the Text and find that the answers are beautiful, wonderful, and oftentimes elusive![return][return]The questions that Dickson chose to use in his book are fascinating and at times uncomfortable...and then you realize that 'in God' there truly is freedom...freedom to question, to argue, to wrestle...to be in awe...[return][return]Can't recommend this book enough!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Camille Turner

    I think its an excellent book. Its great to be able to use the knowledge of anothet culture to understand God better and I love that the book addresses bold meaningful questions rather than simply a storyline

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tonya Wetzel

    I took several months to read this book as I needed time to “digest” each chapter. A truly fascinating read that starts with a premise that it’s ok and helpful to ask questions of our faith and God. Something that I think Christian culture should embrace more. A few favorites from the book: “In that instant, I understand that it takes more faith to ask than it takes to fear the asking. It takes faith to be ready for whatever answer comes, and faith to persevere with more questions if the answer i I took several months to read this book as I needed time to “digest” each chapter. A truly fascinating read that starts with a premise that it’s ok and helpful to ask questions of our faith and God. Something that I think Christian culture should embrace more. A few favorites from the book: “In that instant, I understand that it takes more faith to ask than it takes to fear the asking. It takes faith to be ready for whatever answer comes, and faith to persevere with more questions if the answer is not understood. Asking an honest question means being ready to change in response to the answer, and short of martyrdom, change may be the ultimate act of faith.” “I think sometimes bad things happen to good people so we can watch God turn the greatest tragedies into the purest love.” “Blind faith is arrogant... blind faith is based on something much too small: me.” “All of which makes me wonder, if I listened more and assumed less, what else could I learn?” “My ability to understand the paradoxes of the Bible has no effect whatsoever on God’s ability to exist in ways beyond my comprehension.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joao Luis

    This book is an amazing book to read and dive into. The way this book was written makes you rethink how you treat others and what you think about religion and how you judge religion. This book shows another perspective of one religion (Christian) through another religion (Jewish). The way he talks about Christianism really made me rethink the way I see my religion and my life with God. But it also showed me that even though we have different beliefs we can still learn from one another. This is a This book is an amazing book to read and dive into. The way this book was written makes you rethink how you treat others and what you think about religion and how you judge religion. This book shows another perspective of one religion (Christian) through another religion (Jewish). The way he talks about Christianism really made me rethink the way I see my religion and my life with God. But it also showed me that even though we have different beliefs we can still learn from one another. This is a great book and I enjoyed reading it, I'd recommend it to anyone who is open-minded about religion and wants to learn and understand more.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jennie Blankenship

    This book would be great for a very specific type of reader. Although there were many points I found interesting there were double the amount of conclusions that were painfully drawn. It was immediately obvious this book was written by a conservative Christian which makes his framing of issues at times hard to stick with, I kept wanting to yell, duh!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Best book of 2020! Love!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kim M

    An excellent book. Helped to open my eyes about several misconceptions that I had. A couple of chapters are long and repeating but that doesn't prevent it from being a well worth read. An excellent book. Helped to open my eyes about several misconceptions that I had. A couple of chapters are long and repeating but that doesn't prevent it from being a well worth read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    J.J. Richardson

    This book was an interesting interfaith study that highlighted both the similarities and differences between mainline Christianity and reformed Judaism. Athol's tension with his theology and the Jewish insights into the scriptures was very familiar to me. Of particular interest to me, was the way in which Athol learned that all questions were allowed in his Chever Torah class. They (the students) were allowed and encouraged to ask the most difficult theological questions with reprecussion. I als This book was an interesting interfaith study that highlighted both the similarities and differences between mainline Christianity and reformed Judaism. Athol's tension with his theology and the Jewish insights into the scriptures was very familiar to me. Of particular interest to me, was the way in which Athol learned that all questions were allowed in his Chever Torah class. They (the students) were allowed and encouraged to ask the most difficult theological questions with reprecussion. I also found the Chever Torah insights in to paradoxes helpful. Athol navigates the interaction between the two religions, and comes out an even stronger christian that he was before, but with a profound love for the Jewish people and wiser for having learned their take on the scriptures.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    I liked this book a breat deal. It made me look at things from a different perspective. But I wouild caution that this book is not for everyone. Whether Jew or Christian, I wouild recommend you have some level of Biblical knowledge prior to reading the book. Natrually, the bulk of the book is based on the Tanak or Old Testament. But please do not let that deter you from reading the book with an open mind.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Debi Wittrock

    This book was so awesome. It has made me really look at Judaism and dispensationalism. As Christians we are taught "everyone needs to be saved"- but what about the promises God made to the Jews specifically? What we see as works (keeping Shabbot, keeping kosher...) they see as following the laws and ordinances God has given specifically to them. It has changed my theology enough to make my friends crazy! This book was so awesome. It has made me really look at Judaism and dispensationalism. As Christians we are taught "everyone needs to be saved"- but what about the promises God made to the Jews specifically? What we see as works (keeping Shabbot, keeping kosher...) they see as following the laws and ordinances God has given specifically to them. It has changed my theology enough to make my friends crazy!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Snipes

    Excellent book and highly recommended. Several times in the book I thought I would end up disagreeing with Athol, but as he explained his point, I found that we usually ended up in agreement. There are a few minor points I don't agree, but overall, I consider this book as a must read for any Christian, Jew, or anyone else. Excellent book and highly recommended. Several times in the book I thought I would end up disagreeing with Athol, but as he explained his point, I found that we usually ended up in agreement. There are a few minor points I don't agree, but overall, I consider this book as a must read for any Christian, Jew, or anyone else.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    Very challenging and educational. This is not an easy read, and can actually be used as a Bible study, though it depends on the translation of Bible you have (I do not recommend using the NIV for this). Teaches Christians how to "wrestle with God" as the Jews have always done, and to question typical ideas of who and what God is. Have an open mind, and give this one time to really sink in. Very challenging and educational. This is not an easy read, and can actually be used as a Bible study, though it depends on the translation of Bible you have (I do not recommend using the NIV for this). Teaches Christians how to "wrestle with God" as the Jews have always done, and to question typical ideas of who and what God is. Have an open mind, and give this one time to really sink in.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    This is an honest look at the differences and similarities between Judaism and Christianity. It also addresses (and provides answers for) some of the common misconceptions Jews and Christians have about one another's faiths. I was pleased to learn a lot about Judaism as well as discover some ideas that I can wrestle with about my own faith. This is an honest look at the differences and similarities between Judaism and Christianity. It also addresses (and provides answers for) some of the common misconceptions Jews and Christians have about one another's faiths. I was pleased to learn a lot about Judaism as well as discover some ideas that I can wrestle with about my own faith.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andre

    I thought this was a good read. explained a lot about how judaism and christianity are alike, and how the differ. My favorite part was about the Shema, how from one jewish phrase you get the attributes of God intertwined as a whole.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Jones

    This is a Christian author who spends some time with some Jewish guys and listens more than talks. Sort of original. Makes you rethink Judaism and Christianity.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joey Peacher

  21. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  22. 5 out of 5

    RJ

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  24. 4 out of 5

    Angela H

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle Barnes

  27. 5 out of 5

    Monica

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

  29. 5 out of 5

    Timmy S.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Vojta

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