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Civil War: Marvel Universe

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SC, TPB, in cello, New, Written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS, WARREN ELLIS, PAUL JENKINS, DAN SLOTT, MICHAEL AVON OEMING, MATT FRACTION, ROBERT KIRKMAN, TY TEMPLETON, and MARC GUGGENHEIM. Art by MARC SILVESTRI, TOM RANEY, PAUL SMITH, LEINIL FRANCIS YU, DAVID AJA, PHIL HESTER, SCOTT KOLLINS, and TY TEMPLETON. Cover by MARC SILVESTRI. Published in June of 2007, Softcover, 128 pag SC, TPB, in cello, New, Written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS, WARREN ELLIS, PAUL JENKINS, DAN SLOTT, MICHAEL AVON OEMING, MATT FRACTION, ROBERT KIRKMAN, TY TEMPLETON, and MARC GUGGENHEIM. Art by MARC SILVESTRI, TOM RANEY, PAUL SMITH, LEINIL FRANCIS YU, DAVID AJA, PHIL HESTER, SCOTT KOLLINS, and TY TEMPLETON. Cover by MARC SILVESTRI. Published in June of 2007, Softcover, 128 pages, full color. Cover price $11.99.


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SC, TPB, in cello, New, Written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS, WARREN ELLIS, PAUL JENKINS, DAN SLOTT, MICHAEL AVON OEMING, MATT FRACTION, ROBERT KIRKMAN, TY TEMPLETON, and MARC GUGGENHEIM. Art by MARC SILVESTRI, TOM RANEY, PAUL SMITH, LEINIL FRANCIS YU, DAVID AJA, PHIL HESTER, SCOTT KOLLINS, and TY TEMPLETON. Cover by MARC SILVESTRI. Published in June of 2007, Softcover, 128 pag SC, TPB, in cello, New, Written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS, WARREN ELLIS, PAUL JENKINS, DAN SLOTT, MICHAEL AVON OEMING, MATT FRACTION, ROBERT KIRKMAN, TY TEMPLETON, and MARC GUGGENHEIM. Art by MARC SILVESTRI, TOM RANEY, PAUL SMITH, LEINIL FRANCIS YU, DAVID AJA, PHIL HESTER, SCOTT KOLLINS, and TY TEMPLETON. Cover by MARC SILVESTRI. Published in June of 2007, Softcover, 128 pages, full color. Cover price $11.99.

30 review for Civil War: Marvel Universe

  1. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    This collection seems to be just some issues that couldn't be collected anywhere else. About half of the stories were good, but the other half I had no interest in. I guess it's nice to see Howard the Duck make an appearance, but his story was actually what made me push this down to a two instead of three star rating.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    So this book is going to represent ALL the Civil War comics (since there isn't one book on goodreads for them all and I am totally not commenting on and putting each one individually on my lists). I have all the comics digitally so I'll pop back on here once I finish them all. See you on the other side.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Really just a bunch of stuff thrown together. The only thing here that interested me at all was the Howard the Duck story, that was at least amusing and did a better job of exposing the absurdity of the SHRA than any of the "serious" stories.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christian Smith

    5/10 Stars "years ago, you were forced to make a decision that would change the world. You chose to be a hero. Counteract the poison. Be on the side of the pure."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jake Martin

    Solid character driven story where both sides are given ample opportunity for the reader to fully appreciate both sides of the conflict and where each side is coming from.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anirudh

    To start with, I am not a comic book reader. I’ve read a few manga but after my failed attempt to read X-Men Apocalypse, this is my first full attempt at a comic book arc. I cannot comment on sketches so my focus will be on the story. I know next to nothing about comic books. I only know these characters from Marvel Cinematic Universe. Civil War was a nice experience. There were some good things and there were some bad things in the arc. I read the whole set including related comics such as Black To start with, I am not a comic book reader. I’ve read a few manga but after my failed attempt to read X-Men Apocalypse, this is my first full attempt at a comic book arc. I cannot comment on sketches so my focus will be on the story. I know next to nothing about comic books. I only know these characters from Marvel Cinematic Universe. Civil War was a nice experience. There were some good things and there were some bad things in the arc. I read the whole set including related comics such as Black Panther and Spiderman. Without those this comic makes no sense. It is a crossover with events taking place in multiple comic books. What I really liked about this book was the theme. It was dark gritty and very realistic. It addressed a social issue which post 9/11 USA faced. (Comics were probably addressing real social issues until super villains took over) I liked it because it was a theme people could relate to. Much better than reading about say Galactus eating the planet. The writers compared the struggles to real life events like the US civil war, WW I, slavery and civil rights movement. On one side there is Tony stark who supports registration and on the other side there is Captain America who opposes. The whole superhero team ends up picking sides and ironically previous Super Villains are signed up by Iron Man to hunt down Super Heroes who won’t register. Moving on to the negative points, there were three things that went wrong in the arc. First the whole idea of a registration is based on the fear Iron Man has that super heroes will end up in a war because he met King Arthur. He seems to forget that there are already superhero battles taking place but with super villains. In order to save the world from this war he himself starts this war. His theory is supported by Mr. Fantastic based on strange math formulae which predict earthquakes and volcanoes and whatnot destroying the world. No idea how registration will help prevent any of that. So the entire arc is based on shaky ideas from the start. Second thing to go wrong is the ridiculously stupid ending given to this arc. Something even a ten year old will be sceptical to believe. The entire struggle which lasted over a year of publication is over in one single page and suddenly Captain America realises he is wrong. That made no sense at all. Lastly the aftermath is also very unconvincing. We are told time and again from the point of view of Captain America that the registration will lead to many problems but in the end Stark becomes Director of S.H.I.E.L.D and instantly everything is right in the world. Only Stark’s story is upheld and Captain America’s fears are waved away as baseless propaganda. Considering they spent such a long time opposing it there must have been some reason to do so. That is not addressed at all. There are no consequences apart from one because of the registration. A nice book to enjoy for people who are not familiar with the comic world and only care for a casual reading.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rasheem Johnson

    Once again I'm reminded why I read DC and NOT marvel comics. In civil war we have superheroes pitted against each other on an issue that's so one sided you have to wonder how they're even arguing. Iron Man is OBVIOUSLY correct. Perhaps reading this comic in 2015, when our own police has become militarized and lacks accountability, has skewed my view of the issues. Still think I'd be hard pressed to even entertain Capt. America's stance. Superheroes protesting to not be registered by the governmen Once again I'm reminded why I read DC and NOT marvel comics. In civil war we have superheroes pitted against each other on an issue that's so one sided you have to wonder how they're even arguing. Iron Man is OBVIOUSLY correct. Perhaps reading this comic in 2015, when our own police has become militarized and lacks accountability, has skewed my view of the issues. Still think I'd be hard pressed to even entertain Capt. America's stance. Superheroes protesting to not be registered by the government, and fighting for their right to fight crime without accountability is totally ridiculous. Of course you guys need to be registered. Of course we need to know who you are, cause like you guys are destructive and reckless. Case closed. The civil war morals in this comic is even more black and white than the actual American Civil War (Iron Man pretty much represents the North). The way the argument is set up, there's really no way to side with the anti-registration heroes. Perhaps with a better writer and more time we could've delved in to the grey areas of the arguments, but as it's presented there's really no other way to see it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emmanuel Lightbourne

    Story was awsome and drawings were epic, but the collection is too short and you know the end is really just the beginning here. Nonetheless great effort, looking forward to getting the rest of the books to get some context here.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Galbreath

    Very good but uneven collection of side stories from the Civil War arc. The first part is fairly meandering until the Howard the Duck section, which was entertaining. Most of the book is slice-of-life or one-shots involving different Marvel characters. The best ones are "The Return of Captain Marvel," which is short but one of the more emotional stories, "The Decision," since I always enjoy stories involving the Sentry, and the big final story, "What If Civil War Ended Differently?," which is th Very good but uneven collection of side stories from the Civil War arc. The first part is fairly meandering until the Howard the Duck section, which was entertaining. Most of the book is slice-of-life or one-shots involving different Marvel characters. The best ones are "The Return of Captain Marvel," which is short but one of the more emotional stories, "The Decision," since I always enjoy stories involving the Sentry, and the big final story, "What If Civil War Ended Differently?," which is the best of the collection and gives a truly convincing portrayal of the most ideal way the Civil War could have worked out; sadly, that's not how it did in our timeline. But that's a story for another day. Be warned this collection assumes you have already read the main Civil War storyline and will contain huge spoilers if you haven't.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Blake Coats

    The first 4 collections weren't particularly eventful or interesting, and didn't add to much extra value to the larger Civil War story arc. Although the last part covers 2 what-if scenarios about how the grander Civil War story could have been different - and that part alone was VERY good and is worth checking out!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    It was good, but it was just a bunch of random stories and some of them weren't even that good. Some of the stories didn't even make sense. Eh I don' really care.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nadine Jones

    I'm not really sure why I put this on hold at the library (maybe because I saw Brubaker's name?) but I did, so I read it, and it was really random, just sort of a bunch of pages bound into one book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Atreyu

    junk

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    Yes, I'm currently reading a comic book. Since it's theoretically 120+ comic books and actually a fairly intelligent discussion on what civil rights are and what it means to be "a good guy" and how thin the line can really be between "good intentions" and "bad policy", I think it counts as a book. I'm going to treat it like one anyway. I'm about 40 comics through the series, which is excellent so far, I'll write a more complete review when I'm done. [done] I'll admit, I was really disappointed in Yes, I'm currently reading a comic book. Since it's theoretically 120+ comic books and actually a fairly intelligent discussion on what civil rights are and what it means to be "a good guy" and how thin the line can really be between "good intentions" and "bad policy", I think it counts as a book. I'm going to treat it like one anyway. I'm about 40 comics through the series, which is excellent so far, I'll write a more complete review when I'm done. [done] I'll admit, I was really disappointed in Marvel's Civil War. Let me start off by saying that I really enjoy Marvel's comics, though I don't read them often. I also enjoy the more comprehensive story arcs such as this one or The Age of Apocalypse, mainly because I don't read comics very often and it's hard for me to remember all the little back stories and side plots and everything else that make the normal serials enjoyable. These kinds of story lines generally serve as a kind of "reboot" where everything stands on its own and everything you need to know about the characters is contained within the pages of the story. That holds true for this story as well. I've been wanting to read this series since it came out in 2006. It appeared to be a critique of the worst abuses of our current War on Terror, and seemed to ask the very existential question of, "if you win the war, but sell out your very soul to do it, have you really won?" I think the questions originally asked by this comic are questions that still need to be asked today, and as such, despite being six years old, it still seemed highly relevant. I also thought it was amazing that it was a comic book that was asking these questions, as it would reach an audience that would not normally be exposed to such deep thought and might never ask such things. It would also be read by children, who I feel need to know that there was a time where we didn't cower in fear and didn't continually attempt to trade liberty for security. What disappointed me was the way the comic handled actually answering the questions. It started off fantastic. To put the comic in context, there's a 9/11 style event, where a supervillain goes nuclear and destroys a significant portion of a town, including a small school, killing 600 citizens and several dozen children. Worse, it was the result of a small group of amateur superheros working on a reality television show about apprehending supercriminals. Immediately, everyone wants something to be done. A mutant registration act is passed, so that mutants can be tracked, monitored, and controlled. Those who do not comply are subject to indefinite detention in a prison facility that's not even on this world. They're subject to extraordinary rendition and when one of the superheros responsible for the catastrophe is found alive, he's brutally beaten and tortured in prison. Sound familiar? To top it all off, Captain America, of all people, stands up to say "This is not American, and this is not what Americans do." Standing on the side of law and order are Iron Man and Reed Richards, who effectively say "This is what the people want, and it is the law, so it must be followed." Definitely two different ways to look at the law and it draws some interesting parallels to the world we live in today. There's also some shadowy stuff going on behind the scenes involving both political and corporate espionage and corruption. Really, the stage is nicely set for some really powerful political statements and some fantastic arguments about law, justice, and the American Way. I was completely sucked in. Sometime in the second act, it all starts to fall apart. The writers really had no idea where they wanted to go with the story and they lacked the conviction to actually see their difficult questions through. Semi-minor plot lines that seem to be leading into a bigger picture eventually go nowhere and are dropped without explanation. Major characters change their motivation at the drop of a hat, without any hint of internal conflict or crisis about their decision. And all those difficult questions? They're brushed off by an effective, "yes, it's ok and if you question it you don't deserve an explanation" kind of answer. By the end, it's all a jumbled mess with a conclusion that while shocking, isn't at all satisfying. I quess I shouldn't have expected so much from a comic. But I did. Marvel, you're better than this.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Annette Jordan

    The big one that asks the big questions- should people with special powers register and be held accountable for their activities or should they be free to keep their identities secret. A good read with some really cool artwork Following an explosion with high civilian casualties this very issue has come to the fore, with it now being a legal requirement for those with powers to register. On one side Iron Man, pro registration as he sees it as a way to keep doing good without the risk of being ban The big one that asks the big questions- should people with special powers register and be held accountable for their activities or should they be free to keep their identities secret. A good read with some really cool artwork Following an explosion with high civilian casualties this very issue has come to the fore, with it now being a legal requirement for those with powers to register. On one side Iron Man, pro registration as he sees it as a way to keep doing good without the risk of being banned. On the other Captain America who believes in freedom first of all...the rest of the world is split between the two sides, with the pro registration powers being charged with rounding up their former friends and allies who refuse to register. The reappearance of an apparently dead Thor on the side of registration causes consternation, especially when he kills some of the resistance, but all is not what it seems, and this action causes some of Tony's allies to rethink, especially Sue Storm and Spiderman wcho have always been uneasy. Sue even helps the resistance to escape before leaving herself with her brother a Johnny. Peter confronts Tony and also leaves then encounters some old enemies while hiding. An unlikely hero comes to his rescue and brings him to the resistance . Daredevil is captured and imprisoned. Meanwhile the plan to roll out superhero teams in all 50 states is going ahead while Cap has a plan of his own to break into the prison and free all the captured heroes. Its a long shot and he's going to need help so Sue Storm pleads with Namor to no avail,Dr Strange is staying out of it but Black Panther is in. The prison break seems to be going too easily, and as it turns out its a trap which leads to a huge battle to end all battles. In the end Cap sees the damage the fighting is doing, not just to his friends or to the city but to how the people see their heroes so he surrenders. Most of the rebels are pardoned but some go underground. For now it looks like Tony has won, registration continues, the prison stays open and life goes on .

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cooper Crawford

    So It starts off as a team of hero known as the knew defenders have a reality tv show to show how real heros act they to try and stop a threat which they fail causing a bomb to go off killing a bus of innocent children which causes the hero registration act to make heroes turn over their masks in order to keep the city safe. Many heroes turn over their masks to save the city and other think the Ideas think it outs a bigger target on the heroes themselves endangering the lives of all. When the ac So It starts off as a team of hero known as the knew defenders have a reality tv show to show how real heros act they to try and stop a threat which they fail causing a bomb to go off killing a bus of innocent children which causes the hero registration act to make heroes turn over their masks in order to keep the city safe. Many heroes turn over their masks to save the city and other think the Ideas think it outs a bigger target on the heroes themselves endangering the lives of all. When the act was installed all the heroes who did not register were captured in a high tech prison and were tortured for intel on the other heroes. This was an entertaining book that fun twists and cool turns on how to win. I never thought of the Author was trying to show the heroes can be as human we are based on their special powers and when push comes to shove we are all people. To be honest this is a good story and very story driven more than actual fighting which almost makes it better due to the great story I personally loved it

  17. 5 out of 5

    Arturo

    Choosing sides is intended as promo for other series. So quick previews kinda suck. Kirkman's Ant-Man is most memorable, jus cuz it's so different. The Iron Fist one is good, but I think it's collected in the Iron Fist TPB anyway. In The Return, Sentry seems out of character, I just kept thinking 'why is he talking?' With Iron Man and Mr.Fantastic there, they can handle it. Maybe cuz Bendis has made him into a unstable yet controllable loon. Then again Jenkins created him. Anyway it's another Choosing sides is intended as promo for other series. So quick previews kinda suck. Kirkman's Ant-Man is most memorable, jus cuz it's so different. The Iron Fist one is good, but I think it's collected in the Iron Fist TPB anyway. In The Return, Sentry seems out of character, I just kept thinking 'why is he talking?' With Iron Man and Mr.Fantastic there, they can handle it. Maybe cuz Bendis has made him into a unstable yet controllable loon. Then again Jenkins created him. Anyway it's another promo. Plus the Sentry story, which is ok. CW: The Initiative. Has Great art by Silvestri. and an ok story.. Or promo for Omega Flight, Thunderbolts and Avengers. Story wise, even if I look at it as ..what are these characters up to and how is the civil war affecting them.. Kinda Way. I just don't really care about them. (Even Venom isn't venom. It's not Brock its Gargan. I wont mention the She-Hulk and Winter Soldier stories, cuz they are collected in their own book anyway.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ozy Ali

    The story starts out full of feels. Lots of interesting characters are affected in very real ways. Being a fan of marvel over the years, the trauma that Peter Parker goes through is definitely something that weighed heavy with me. However, reading a mound of side comics of characters I've never heard of, nor have any interest in, made this a bit cumbersome. I have to say, when you have the flagships going, the Captain, Iron Man, Spiderman(my favourite), then the writing is great, the art is fant The story starts out full of feels. Lots of interesting characters are affected in very real ways. Being a fan of marvel over the years, the trauma that Peter Parker goes through is definitely something that weighed heavy with me. However, reading a mound of side comics of characters I've never heard of, nor have any interest in, made this a bit cumbersome. I have to say, when you have the flagships going, the Captain, Iron Man, Spiderman(my favourite), then the writing is great, the art is fantastic and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. When you get Ed the duck and other such crappy chars (I can't even remember their names) being featured for entire comics, it takes the feels away, and make no mistake, this series is all about the feels. Overall I did like it, but the feeling of disappointment from all the massive amounts of extrenuous comics that are really not significant (the runaways, for example) do play a part in the overall enjoyment I took away from this series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alex Flynn

    It's an interesting premise but it doesn't develop from their, and in the end devolves into incoherent fighting with poorly identified sides. After reading this I learned that this was a major arc across multiple series and the problem may just be this collection doesn't have enough of the stories to make much sense. It posits a good central conflict for a civil war between heroes, with neither side too obviously right or wrong (although they do make some pretty bad decisions) but after that set It's an interesting premise but it doesn't develop from their, and in the end devolves into incoherent fighting with poorly identified sides. After reading this I learned that this was a major arc across multiple series and the problem may just be this collection doesn't have enough of the stories to make much sense. It posits a good central conflict for a civil war between heroes, with neither side too obviously right or wrong (although they do make some pretty bad decisions) but after that set-up, it just becomes a rote chess match with deaths and large fights. And the characters keep repeating the same arguments from page 1 until the end. I think the collection probably does a disservice to a much better story, just like a edited for tv version of a film does a disservice to the original.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic Premise: A collection of shorts surrounding the Marvel Civil War. Should superheroes register with the government to do their thing or not? That is the great question of the Civil War. Iron Man leads one side and Captain America the other. No matter which side you feel is stronger morally, it's an intense fight on every front. That said, this collection is a bunch of side stories that aren't really part of the main plot. As a result, there are all kinds of spoilers for the events of Civil W Basic Premise: A collection of shorts surrounding the Marvel Civil War. Should superheroes register with the government to do their thing or not? That is the great question of the Civil War. Iron Man leads one side and Captain America the other. No matter which side you feel is stronger morally, it's an intense fight on every front. That said, this collection is a bunch of side stories that aren't really part of the main plot. As a result, there are all kinds of spoilers for the events of Civil War, so don't read it on its own or before the main stories.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stacey Marie

    Although I love Civil War, I don't understand why anyone would want this particular collection in print instead of just reading the entire series. Those just trying to get into it will be lost and confused, and worst of all missing huge important plot points that give meaning to these individual spot lights. They will also spoil the story a bit for those who intend to go back and read the whole thing. People who've already read Civil War in its entirety obviously wouldn't need to read this as th Although I love Civil War, I don't understand why anyone would want this particular collection in print instead of just reading the entire series. Those just trying to get into it will be lost and confused, and worst of all missing huge important plot points that give meaning to these individual spot lights. They will also spoil the story a bit for those who intend to go back and read the whole thing. People who've already read Civil War in its entirety obviously wouldn't need to read this as they are not the best parts of Civil War. So.. IDK.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    A fun collection of Civil War-related one-shots. I'd give this only three stars, except that the She Hulk and Howard the Duck stories were lots of fun, worth an extra star even. She Hulk also gives us Paul Smith on the art. I've been a fan of his work since his X-Men days, so this was a treat. Howard the Duck had Ty Templeton writing, and I've been a fan of his work since his Stig's Inferno days. Good stuff! The rest of the book is pretty generic superhero fare, not bad, but not especially memor A fun collection of Civil War-related one-shots. I'd give this only three stars, except that the She Hulk and Howard the Duck stories were lots of fun, worth an extra star even. She Hulk also gives us Paul Smith on the art. I've been a fan of his work since his X-Men days, so this was a treat. Howard the Duck had Ty Templeton writing, and I've been a fan of his work since his Stig's Inferno days. Good stuff! The rest of the book is pretty generic superhero fare, not bad, but not especially memorable either.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Silas

    This is a selection of short stories focused more on personal reactions to the registration act, and I happen to like that about it. Many stories set up other series, but also dealt with the crossover. There were a few characters that I had previously felt were on particular sides for no reason, and this dealt with some of those. The Howard the Duck story was a good fit as well, both for the event and for his history. This definitely doesn't stand alone, but if you have read other parts off the This is a selection of short stories focused more on personal reactions to the registration act, and I happen to like that about it. Many stories set up other series, but also dealt with the crossover. There were a few characters that I had previously felt were on particular sides for no reason, and this dealt with some of those. The Howard the Duck story was a good fit as well, both for the event and for his history. This definitely doesn't stand alone, but if you have read other parts off the storyline and are a general comics reader, this adds some depth.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Megan M

    Easily the most unnecessary of all the Civil War collections. A highly disjointed collection bringing together the Civil War stories of some fringe characters like She-Hulk, Daredevil and Howard the Duck. The She-Hulk story was pretty good, but the rest was disposable. If you're a fan of one of the included characters, you might want to flip through this collection at the library, but I would not suggest purchasing this collection.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Naomi Ruth

    I had mixed feelings, but I think that's because I don't know enough about the world yet. And I'm still not sure how I feel about the duck guy. But. Despite it being super weird, I think it was one of my favorite sections. It was just so. Absurd. And America. And the US Government. And the craziness of humans. I'm. I'm just not sure what to say. But definitely some artwork that had me stroking the pages.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shiree

    I only gave this two stars because of the art and somewhat annoying trends I saw in Civil War (complete comics). (Now that I see Robert Kirkman did art for it I need to find which one that story was and look at the art again too.) As much as I love Iron Man, he was too much in each story. Yes, I know he's a reason why the Civil War storyline for Marvel is the way it is, but at least give focus to others.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    The Marvel Civil War storyline was an epic, far-reaching plot and was full of action and fast-paced plot. At times, some of the tie-ins were less than fantastic, but stand-outs include the Amazing Spider-Man line, and the base Civil War 5-issue series. One of the better crossovers Marvel has done. Highly recommended.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Yoga Pradipta

    The storyline is too scattered... They better not bring up some stories (howard duck, omega flight, dare devil/iron fist, captain marvel) because they're not effecting the story at all and floating without reason. although the beginning and the main story was good. And oh! Too bad they didn't dig deeper on she-hulk side story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Annemarie Donahue

    Pretty good, I gave it a "really liked it" because I did but the ending left a bad taste in my mouth. Also too little use of the XMen and too much Tony Stark/Capt. America personality conflicts. I was not surprised at Reed from Fantastic Four being a prick, he always kinda sucked. This was a good series and I liked it, but ultimately the ending feels weird and to me, fell flat.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    A very, very disjointed ancillary crossover book. A good She-Hulk story is followed by what amount to previews of upcoming books like Omega Flight, Thunderbolts, Iron Fist, Mighty Avengers, and others. The low point is definitely the return of Captain Marvel, which seems unnecessary.

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