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Regulating the Lives of Women: Social Welfare Policy from Colonial Times to the Present (Revised Edition)

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This important book looks at the changes in AFDC, Social Security, and Unemployment Insurance, and welfare "reform." This new edition reveals how welfare policy scapegoats women more than ever to justify widespread retrenchment and to divert the public's attention from the real causes of the nation's mounting economic woes.


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This important book looks at the changes in AFDC, Social Security, and Unemployment Insurance, and welfare "reform." This new edition reveals how welfare policy scapegoats women more than ever to justify widespread retrenchment and to divert the public's attention from the real causes of the nation's mounting economic woes.

30 review for Regulating the Lives of Women: Social Welfare Policy from Colonial Times to the Present (Revised Edition)

  1. 5 out of 5

    elle

    I read this for a gender and social policy course, but it was truly a pleasure. Easy to understand, but puts words and understanding to many of the things inherent to our cultural practice of gender. Takes a rather cis-centric tact, however, but that's partially a product of its time.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul Garcia

    Excellent book looking at our welfare state and the manner in which it has been used to subjugate women.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    cleaning out some things and came across a classic. Our Nation is FILLED with a history of laws, policies and institutional bias based upon gender [among other things]. We really seem to be going backwards in time with current rhetoric and advocacy perported to be based on Christianity. Women's concern is not "male bashing" nor "religion bashing". Its self-advocacy regarding continued efforts at regulating the lives of women.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bucket

    good on the historical. also good on the analysis. personally, i found it boring because i didn't find much new information. also abramovitz is kind of a boring writer. i'm probably not the best person to review this book, actually.i'd say if you have no or little background in feminism andor political economy it would be a good read? who knows.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Law

    Packed full of information, history and analysis. I do wish that Abramovitz hadn't left organizing til the very end (and then only briefly mentioned it). I would have loved to read about how people tried to challenge repressive regulations around mothering, poverty and aid programs from the very early days of the colonies until present day.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nico Harlakenden-Newton

    very good. up for grabs.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aleah

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

  10. 4 out of 5

    jessica martin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nickel

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Noell

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura I.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mary Champagne

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  16. 4 out of 5

    Feminista

  17. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hkilkenny

  19. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Donhoff

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ariel Young

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emmett

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jessica K. Camp

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Silk

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katie Mcdannald

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mark Fitzpatrick

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sara Romano

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

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