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Somewhere in Germany is the sequel to the acclaimed Nowhere in Africa, which was turned into the Oscar-winning film of the same name. This novel traces the return of the Redlich family to Germany after their nine-year exile in Kenya during World War II. In Africa, Walter had longed for his homeland and dreamed of rebuilding his life as a lawyer, yet ultimately he and his f Somewhere in Germany is the sequel to the acclaimed Nowhere in Africa, which was turned into the Oscar-winning film of the same name. This novel traces the return of the Redlich family to Germany after their nine-year exile in Kenya during World War II. In Africa, Walter had longed for his homeland and dreamed of rebuilding his life as a lawyer, yet ultimately he and his family—wife Jettel, daughter Regina, and baby Max—realize that Germany seems as exotic and unwelcoming to them in 1947 as Kenya had seemed in 1938. Hunger and desperation are omnipresent in bombed-out Frankfurt, and this Jewish family—especially Regina, who misses Africa the most—has a hard time adjusting to their new circumstances. Yet slowly the family adapts to their new home amidst the ruins.  In Frankfurt, Regina matures into a woman and, though her parents want her to marry an upstanding Jewish man, her love life progresses in its own idiosyncratic fashion. She develops a passion for art and journalism and begins her professional career at a Frankfurt newspaper. Walter at last finds professional success as a lawyer, but never quite adjusts to life in Frankfurt, recalling with nostalgia his childhood in Upper Silesia and his years in Africa. Only his son Max truly finds what Walter had hoped for: a new homeland in Germany.  Although the Redlichs receive kindness from strangers, they also learn anti-Semitism still prevails in post-Nazi Germany. They partake in the West German “economic miracle” with their own home, a second-hand car, and the discovery of television, but young Max’s discovery of the Holocaust revives long-buried memories. Rich in memorable moments and characters, this novel portrays the reality of postwar German society in vivid and candid detail.


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Somewhere in Germany is the sequel to the acclaimed Nowhere in Africa, which was turned into the Oscar-winning film of the same name. This novel traces the return of the Redlich family to Germany after their nine-year exile in Kenya during World War II. In Africa, Walter had longed for his homeland and dreamed of rebuilding his life as a lawyer, yet ultimately he and his f Somewhere in Germany is the sequel to the acclaimed Nowhere in Africa, which was turned into the Oscar-winning film of the same name. This novel traces the return of the Redlich family to Germany after their nine-year exile in Kenya during World War II. In Africa, Walter had longed for his homeland and dreamed of rebuilding his life as a lawyer, yet ultimately he and his family—wife Jettel, daughter Regina, and baby Max—realize that Germany seems as exotic and unwelcoming to them in 1947 as Kenya had seemed in 1938. Hunger and desperation are omnipresent in bombed-out Frankfurt, and this Jewish family—especially Regina, who misses Africa the most—has a hard time adjusting to their new circumstances. Yet slowly the family adapts to their new home amidst the ruins.  In Frankfurt, Regina matures into a woman and, though her parents want her to marry an upstanding Jewish man, her love life progresses in its own idiosyncratic fashion. She develops a passion for art and journalism and begins her professional career at a Frankfurt newspaper. Walter at last finds professional success as a lawyer, but never quite adjusts to life in Frankfurt, recalling with nostalgia his childhood in Upper Silesia and his years in Africa. Only his son Max truly finds what Walter had hoped for: a new homeland in Germany.  Although the Redlichs receive kindness from strangers, they also learn anti-Semitism still prevails in post-Nazi Germany. They partake in the West German “economic miracle” with their own home, a second-hand car, and the discovery of television, but young Max’s discovery of the Holocaust revives long-buried memories. Rich in memorable moments and characters, this novel portrays the reality of postwar German society in vivid and candid detail.

30 review for Somewhere in Germany

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    I liked this book immensely. The book explores a deep subject: a Jewish family leaving Africa, where they had sought refuge from Nazism, and returning to post-WW II Germany, to confront not only the horrible fate dealt to them and their families there during those times, but also the extreme hardships of day-to-day life in a destroyed society, where everything was lacking in those years of the late 40s. In ways, it seemed an impossible subject to deal with, but the author succeeded for me, in a I liked this book immensely. The book explores a deep subject: a Jewish family leaving Africa, where they had sought refuge from Nazism, and returning to post-WW II Germany, to confront not only the horrible fate dealt to them and their families there during those times, but also the extreme hardships of day-to-day life in a destroyed society, where everything was lacking in those years of the late 40s. In ways, it seemed an impossible subject to deal with, but the author succeeded for me, in a very credible way. Perhaps also because I spent many years living in Africa myself and also lived in Germany in the early 60s, I appreciated the way the author captured the ways of thinking and interpreting life that she learned in Africa and wove them into her and her family's views of life back in Germany. It was as if the lessons of Africa never left them and helped them through both the difficult and the good times. The book is not only interesting from this historical and very personal perspective, but also because it is literary - lyrical at times. Indeed, the prequel to this book (Nowhere in Africa) was the same way and this second book made me appreciate the first one even more.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark Reynolds

    I had watched the movie "Nowhere in Africa," so I knew the premise - that the Redlich family had gone to Kenya to escape the Nazis in WWII Germany. I enjoyed the depiction of post WWII Germany, and many things that I hadn't known about. Certainly the tension between those who claimed not to have known what had happened to the Jews, and the Jews, didn't go away immediately. It must have been a very trying time, and I don't think that I would have been brave enough to return to Germany at that tim I had watched the movie "Nowhere in Africa," so I knew the premise - that the Redlich family had gone to Kenya to escape the Nazis in WWII Germany. I enjoyed the depiction of post WWII Germany, and many things that I hadn't known about. Certainly the tension between those who claimed not to have known what had happened to the Jews, and the Jews, didn't go away immediately. It must have been a very trying time, and I don't think that I would have been brave enough to return to Germany at that time. I expected the book to be an autobiography of Regina, but in fact it focused mostly on the father, Walter. I did not like that character. Although he showered his family with compliments, he also denigrated his wife and daughter. Women have "long hair, little intelligence," and "now my son Max will see how much better it is to live without women." Walter constantly said these types of things, and that's why I have it only 3 stars. The life depictions could not overcome that for me. It was too much of an homage to Walter. I would have liked to know more about Regina and her life, especially after she left school. But everything we learned about her was how she related to her family, and especially her father. We didn't learn much about her. I was originally interested in reading "Nowhere in Africa," but I don't think I will now. The movie was enough.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alice Lubrecht

    I liked this book but was challenged to be reading it on Saturday the 27th of October as a gunman decided to shoot up a synagogue. It is a poignant tale of a Jewish family returning from self exile in Kenya after WWII and news events magnified the issues with me as I read it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    John Benson

    This is a sequel to the book, NOWHERE IN AFRICA, and tells of the Redlichs move from Kenya back to Germany after being Jewish refugees in Kenya for 10 years. It brings out their uneasy relationship with the post-war Germany. While the first book really held my interest, the story line seemed more disjointed and it was harder to follow. The daughter's deep love for her father, her uneasy relationship to Germany, and her deep love for her time in Africa continue in this book. This is a sequel to the book, NOWHERE IN AFRICA, and tells of the Redlichs move from Kenya back to Germany after being Jewish refugees in Kenya for 10 years. It brings out their uneasy relationship with the post-war Germany. While the first book really held my interest, the story line seemed more disjointed and it was harder to follow. The daughter's deep love for her father, her uneasy relationship to Germany, and her deep love for her time in Africa continue in this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shira Reiss

    Didn't love it. I loved the movie "Nowhere in Africa" which is book one. This book picks up where the other book ended. I don't know if it was the translator or what, but I found the thoughts were run-on sentences. The only thing I found of interest was the description of the poverty directly after WW2 in Germany. I also do not understand how any Jew could return to Germany after the war. Didn't love it. I loved the movie "Nowhere in Africa" which is book one. This book picks up where the other book ended. I don't know if it was the translator or what, but I found the thoughts were run-on sentences. The only thing I found of interest was the description of the poverty directly after WW2 in Germany. I also do not understand how any Jew could return to Germany after the war.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Janet Gutierrez

    Good, but not as good as her other book Nowhere in Africa.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Fascinating and highly personal. One of the best accounts of post-war life in Germany I've come across. Fascinating and highly personal. One of the best accounts of post-war life in Germany I've come across.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Feodora

    Eine wunderbare Fortsetzung von Nirgendwo in Afrika

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jasmin

    The sequel to 'Nowhere in Africa' was great. It was so interesting to learn about the conditions in post-war Gemany. The sequel to 'Nowhere in Africa' was great. It was so interesting to learn about the conditions in post-war Gemany.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sonja

    Much quicker to read than the first. The translation seemed to flow better. Good book!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  12. 5 out of 5

    Xavier

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lida De jong

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gary Cahoon

  16. 4 out of 5

    Simon

  17. 5 out of 5

    Efie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Enny

  19. 5 out of 5

    Charity

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

  21. 5 out of 5

    Justine

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nina

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fleka

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diana *always waiting for the next vacation*

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Zareva

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eline

    niet altijd even logisch. vertaling hapert soms

  28. 4 out of 5

    Penny

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rahel

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carol

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