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All the Water in the World

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A lively and inspiring poem weaves together facts about water and the need for water conservation.


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A lively and inspiring poem weaves together facts about water and the need for water conservation.

30 review for All the Water in the World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Pooja

    Is all the water in the world? Reading these books strengthen my belief in humanity. Is all the water in the world? Reading these books strengthen my belief in humanity.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    The role of the public library has changed so often over the last century or so that its latest incarnation as a supporter of public education turns out to be one of the more logical connections you'd expect from this essential institution. Suddenly public libraries around the country are purchasing books that support school agendas and school curriculums. They've always done so to a certain degree, but now that school library budgets are being slashed, public libraries often find themselves pic The role of the public library has changed so often over the last century or so that its latest incarnation as a supporter of public education turns out to be one of the more logical connections you'd expect from this essential institution. Suddenly public libraries around the country are purchasing books that support school agendas and school curriculums. They've always done so to a certain degree, but now that school library budgets are being slashed, public libraries often find themselves picking up the slack. That means that suddenly they have to start buying books that support already existing subject areas. You know. Second grade biographies. Colonial America. That sort of thing. One subject that I know schools teach regular is "the water cycle". Kids need to learn about it, preferably along with the environmental implications. Now a library has a choice. It can go out and buy some dull as dishwater textbooks that have all the science and none of the verve, guaranteeing that their child readers fall to sleep before they reach page four. OR they can locate books like George Ella Lyon and Katherine Tillotson's All the Water in the World. This is the kind of book that's going to fulfill a variety of different needs all at once. It makes teachers happy because it teaches science. It makes libraries happy because of its visual splendor and poetic language. And it makes kids happy because, quite frankly, its fun. You know what that means, don't you? This book's the best kind of triple threat. You get a pretty good sense of author George Ellen Lyon's writing style the minute you notice that the title is part of the book's first sentence. On the title page you'll read "All the water in the world" and then when you turn the page you encounter " . . . is all the water in the world." So right there you've handed child readers an oddly Zen but true sentence. Let `em chew on it a while and try to find a loophole. If they start talking about water from space then you start teaching a space unit as well, or maybe a vocabulary lesson where you determine what "in the world" really means. For the record, the book is full of these little verbal riddles. "Water doesn't come. It goes. Around." I sort of love that. I also love "that rain has been here before," setting up the idea of things circling around and around until something somewhere goes wrong. Lyon is a poet in her own right so while she's discussing matters of the material world she's still not afraid to throw in some delicious language. "Thirsty air / licks it from lakes / sips it from ponds / guzzles it from oceans . . ." How many books about the water cycle make you want to read them over and over again? Not too many, honey. Not too many. I've a low didacticism tolerance, even when the message being conveyed is one I believe in. And different lessons become trendy over the years. Early American children's books used to convey dull tales of morality in the hopes of shaping their young readers' ethics. Some books in the 20th century sought to reinforce social mores and then, later, to break them down. These days the hot topics you'll find in a large swath of books for kids are anti-bullying screeds and environmental messages. Both are worthy subjects of titles for kids, but of the books published I'd say a good 90% are simply awful. You've probably seen them. They're the kinds of books that make the Berenstain Bears look subtle in comparison. So part of what I appreciated so much about All the Water in the World was that while the environmental message is there (the last three words in the book are "keep Earth green!" after all) it's introduced subtly and naturally into the text. You can't talk about water without talking about what's happening to it around the globe, after all. Not even in a picture book. But rather than straight out say to kids the obvious "pollution is bad" message, Lyon is clever enough to show the vast use of water, who it helps, what it does, and so on. That way, when she gets to the end and says we should keep it clean and the Earth green, kids already understand why. For that reason this book would actually pair rather nicely with the equally curriculum-friendly Coral Reefs by Jason Chin. I don't know why it took so long for an editor to realize that Ms. Tillotson's kinetic art is perfect for nonfiction subject matter. Until now she's done lovely work on books like When the Library Lights Go Out and It's Picture Day Today but All the Water in the World feels like a step in a different direction. Like It's Picture Day Today there's life and energy to the art, but there's something else going on there. Purpose. Now Tillotson's images have the dual purpose of entertaining and informing. She takes up the challenge readily, causing water droplets to form shapes of deer and children in the spaces between their flow. Thirsty air now has a form and the sudden vertical two-page spread that forces readers to turn their books contains such a convincing downpour that you'll half believe your fingers will grow damp when you touch it. I don't think I was the only one to be shocked when I reached the publication information at the book's end and discovered that the art here is entirely digital. Digital? When I think of digital art I think of slick single-color lines and dull shading, not splatters of water turning into snails and squirrels or a mimicry of watercolors that looks like the page itself is rippling. Tillotson masters the electronic form, matching Lyon's poetry page for page, word for word, blow by blow. I should note that there will be some teachers who find the book insufficient for school assignments. There is no Bibliography at the end. No Afterword. No Glossary of terms. The book shows how the water cycle works, but it does so in a fun artistic way, not a rote scientific one. You won't see graphs with arrows that label each part of the process. You will see rain plucked from oceans, carried over mountains, and rained onto plains, but it feels like it's part of a story not a lesson. For that reason I really feel the book should be a vital part of every library system. Anyone can stuff facts onto a page. To make the material sing takes a special hand or two. And as luck would have it, four special hands from two talented women came together to create this little gem of a book. If you're looking to give a gift to a child but you want to hand them something informative rather than the fiction you've been giving out all these years, give All the Water in the World a shot. It's a hoot and a beaut. Poetry and nonfiction and art all coming together to make everybody happy. For ages 4-8.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Beautiful art inspired by Eric Carle, but richer, with images within images etc. (Thankfully very different from her Library Lights...). Poem reads well, with lots of juicy words, and some 'concrete poetry' images; could be drawn upon as a mentor text. A bit skimpy on the facts; use it as a companion to a water or environmental unit unless you're just simply sharing it with preschool. Highly recommended to poets, parents and teachers. (That second person address to 'honey' sounds off, to me, thou Beautiful art inspired by Eric Carle, but richer, with images within images etc. (Thankfully very different from her Library Lights...). Poem reads well, with lots of juicy words, and some 'concrete poetry' images; could be drawn upon as a mentor text. A bit skimpy on the facts; use it as a companion to a water or environmental unit unless you're just simply sharing it with preschool. Highly recommended to poets, parents and teachers. (That second person address to 'honey' sounds off, to me, though, so I won't give it the full five stars. I think its inclusion limits the appeal to older children, unfortunately.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    This is beautifully written. It is a poetic text that celebrates the water cycle and how vital water is to all life on earth. It's too light on details to stand alone for teaching about the subject but it would be good as a companion to a more fact-based book. (I do wish there had been some suggestions for further reading in the back).

  5. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    A picture book featuring a poem by Lyon, whose work I like, about one of our main endangered resources, fresh water. I liked Tillotson's kinetic art, too. I typically don't like didactic books, as they usually have the opposite of the intended political effect, but this one I liked because it's not really overtly preachy, it's a poem, visually poetic, and about a crucially important subject for everyone.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carolynne

    Simple but forceful book relating the water cycle, and the inequities of water distribution, digitally illustrated with bright bold colors by Katherine Tillotson, whose work may remind you of Denise Fleming's. Unusual layouts, a variety of font sizes, and use of concrete poetry make the words as memorable as the pictures. Good for use in a science or environment class in a primary classroom, but it has nothing in common with the typical water cycle chapter in a textbook: it is vivid and lively a Simple but forceful book relating the water cycle, and the inequities of water distribution, digitally illustrated with bright bold colors by Katherine Tillotson, whose work may remind you of Denise Fleming's. Unusual layouts, a variety of font sizes, and use of concrete poetry make the words as memorable as the pictures. Good for use in a science or environment class in a primary classroom, but it has nothing in common with the typical water cycle chapter in a textbook: it is vivid and lively and exciting, as well as informative. Lexile measure is 520, just the same as The Polar Express..

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    Wonderful book that will teach children how important water is to everyone (now if only adults could learn this)!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gwen Martin

    This book explained the water cycle in a way that young children could understand, which I really liked about it. George Ella Lyon began by showing different ways we use water in our lives and the many ways it is available to us. She then asks the question, "Where does it come from?". She then proceeds to show the water cycle and explain each step so that anyone could understand. The way she uses similes makes the book even more enjoyable to read. She also elaborates on how, even if it is rainin This book explained the water cycle in a way that young children could understand, which I really liked about it. George Ella Lyon began by showing different ways we use water in our lives and the many ways it is available to us. She then asks the question, "Where does it come from?". She then proceeds to show the water cycle and explain each step so that anyone could understand. The way she uses similes makes the book even more enjoyable to read. She also elaborates on how, even if it is raining where you are, it is not raining everywhere, and some places wait a very long time for water. I really liked how she included this in her book, trying to make us appreciate the water we have even more. I especially liked the very end of the book when it ended with "Keep Earth green!". It was a challenge to all the readers to be smart about the way they use water, and it will get young students focused more on helping the planet. The illustrator did an excellent job using the whole page and making the pictures interesting. They helped to tell the story and really made it jump off the page. The pictures helped with the understanding of the concepts, because you could actually see what George Ella Lyon was talking about in the text. This book was very fun to read! It was enjoyable to look at the pictures, and you learned a little bit too.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    This is a great book! I love the illustrations but even more, I love the word choice. It's poetic and filled with detail. For example, listen to this sentence: "That rain that cascaded from clouds and meandered down mountains, that wavered over waterfalls then slipped into rivers and opened into oceans, that rain has been here before." Or this line: "Tap dance avalanche stampede of drips and drops and drumming-a wealth of water." Great book to discuss the water cycle. I am going to use it as we d This is a great book! I love the illustrations but even more, I love the word choice. It's poetic and filled with detail. For example, listen to this sentence: "That rain that cascaded from clouds and meandered down mountains, that wavered over waterfalls then slipped into rivers and opened into oceans, that rain has been here before." Or this line: "Tap dance avalanche stampede of drips and drops and drumming-a wealth of water." Great book to discuss the water cycle. I am going to use it as we discuss living and nonliving things. But it could also be used to talk about word choice and imagery. It definitely provides a way to talk about the importance of keeping our rivers/waterways clean and not wasting water. Love this!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Donalyn

    Poet George Ella Lyon elegantly and simply describes the water cycle through rhyming text and active verbs. Page layouts combine various font sizes and directions on top of Katherine Tillotson's bold illustrations.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    Water cycle, told poetically. Fabulous illustrations.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Randie D. Camp, M.S.

    A beautiful, poetic book about water. Lyon offers a message about conserving water in a non-preachy way.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lin Lin

    A masterfully illustrated and beautifully versed book, it gave me and my second-grader son so much joy reading it together.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    Colorful digitally-created illustrations nicely complement this poem that pays homage to water, an essential part of life on Earth.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    28 May 2011 ALL THE WATER IN THE WORLD by George Ella Lyon and Katherine Tillotson, Atheneum, March 2011, 40p., ISBN: 978-1-4169-7130-6 "Water doesn't come. It goes. Around." "Fresh water makes up less than 3% of the water on Earth. Over two-thirds of this is tied up in polar ice caps and glaciers. Fresh water lakes and rivers make up only 0.009% of water on Earth and groundwater makes up .28%" -- Water Wars Worldwide website "Oh, the water, Oh, the water, Oh, the water, Let it run all over me." -- Van 28 May 2011 ALL THE WATER IN THE WORLD by George Ella Lyon and Katherine Tillotson, Atheneum, March 2011, 40p., ISBN: 978-1-4169-7130-6 "Water doesn't come. It goes. Around." "Fresh water makes up less than 3% of the water on Earth. Over two-thirds of this is tied up in polar ice caps and glaciers. Fresh water lakes and rivers make up only 0.009% of water on Earth and groundwater makes up .28%" -- Water Wars Worldwide website "Oh, the water, Oh, the water, Oh, the water, Let it run all over me." -- Van Morrison, "It Stoned Me" Being that water is the single most important ingredient in sustaining a human life, it is essential that we pay attention to the increasingly difficult job of providing drinkable water to all of the world's ever-growing population. So it is that we need eye-catching books that educate young people about the water cycle as does ALL THE WATER IN THE WORLD. Where does your drinking water come from? I'm fortunate. I live in a place where it rains all winter and I am able to pump water out of the ground whenever I need it. There is plenty for us to wash our dishes, water our garden, and fill up buckets for our Nubian goats. For much of California, it is becoming a different story. According to a state-wide water agency education program, California's Water: A Crisis We Cannot Ignore, 25 million people and 2.5 million acres of farmland are supplied water from the Sacramento Delta, where the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers meet. But with more and more people living in California combined with climate change, and periodic droughts, there are sometimes shortages. And, without a lot of work, the old levees that protect all of the Delta's fresh water from floods and tides could eventually fail -- particularly in the event of a major earthquake. Then what will happen with these millions of people who need fresh water every day? There are, of course, parts of the world where severe water shortages are a way of life. "But far away it's a different day no sound but wind empty cup again dry grasses rustle dirt's just dust." ALL THE WATER IN THE WORLD is a poetic text picturebook that combines three of my passions: ecology, poetry, and picturebooks of interest to older readers. The illustrations are filled with raining, flowing, splashing, dripping, wobbling water...until we encounter one of those places where they are waiting for some rain to fall. "Everything waits for an open gate in a wall of clouds to rain sweet and loud to fill the well and start the stream." There are a lot of things that we can run out of and still go on living. Fresh water is not one of them. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.com [email protected] Moderator http://groups.yahoo.com/group/middle_... Moderator http://groups.yahoo.com/group/EcolIt/ http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/people/facult...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Perry

    Summary: This book discusses how water moves from the Earth, to the atmosphere, and back to Earth in a process known as the water cycle. The story is told to a child from a mother's point of view. She tells her child that water is precious, that we should not waste it, and that we should keep it clean. Evaluation: The words in this story are not written in typical straight lines, from left to right across each page. The words are written the way water travels; up, down, and all around. The illust Summary: This book discusses how water moves from the Earth, to the atmosphere, and back to Earth in a process known as the water cycle. The story is told to a child from a mother's point of view. She tells her child that water is precious, that we should not waste it, and that we should keep it clean. Evaluation: The words in this story are not written in typical straight lines, from left to right across each page. The words are written the way water travels; up, down, and all around. The illustrations are bright, with some amount of blue on each page. The author uses adjectives to describe the movements of the water. Teaching Point: This book could be used as a read-aloud, integrating science and literacy. Students could listen to and discuss some of the adjectives from the book. Then, students could write their own story about how water moves throughout the Earth, using adjectives to describe the motion.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Ballard

    Summary: This book is written as a poem and states facts about where water comes from and where it goes. It touches on information about the ocean and waterways. A message is presented in the book how water connects everyone on the planet and how we need to conserve our water. Evaluation: This book uses a lot of illustrations that go along perfectly with the text. I like how the book is informational, but is portrayed in poetry form. The message of water conservation is important and it is sharin Summary: This book is written as a poem and states facts about where water comes from and where it goes. It touches on information about the ocean and waterways. A message is presented in the book how water connects everyone on the planet and how we need to conserve our water. Evaluation: This book uses a lot of illustrations that go along perfectly with the text. I like how the book is informational, but is portrayed in poetry form. The message of water conservation is important and it is sharing it in a way that younger generations can understand. Teaching Ideas This could be incorporated into a science lesson when learning about the water cycle. The book explains where water goes. It would be fun to let students be creative and come up with different ways that we could do to conserve our water. This could be coming up with an invention and then having the students write to explain it. This can incorporate science into ELA.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    This was so many good things in one small book. This read as a spoken poem, to me at least. It was very poetry like, not sure if intentionally. I think it touches on how the water cycle works, while also allowing for more exploration. It's not CLEARLY water cycle, it's poetry water cycle. But I do think kids would enjoy it. Plus, it also ends with a activist approach, so allowing students to think about water and its purpose and clean water and what it means to keep the earth green. I think this This was so many good things in one small book. This read as a spoken poem, to me at least. It was very poetry like, not sure if intentionally. I think it touches on how the water cycle works, while also allowing for more exploration. It's not CLEARLY water cycle, it's poetry water cycle. But I do think kids would enjoy it. Plus, it also ends with a activist approach, so allowing students to think about water and its purpose and clean water and what it means to keep the earth green. I think this could easily lend itself to writing about the earth and maybe even speak to students if they feel strongly about water and the earth.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    Audience:4 and up, smaller children or those learning about the water cycle in school Appeal:This book engages young readers with bright,colorful pictures that flow across the pages. Use of different fonts, angles, and even having the reader turn the book sideways to read the words, keep the reader guessing at what comes next. The author uses onomatopoeia, personification and rhyme at different times throughout the book on an inconsistent basis making each page new. Bill Martin Jr. Picture Book A Audience:4 and up, smaller children or those learning about the water cycle in school Appeal:This book engages young readers with bright,colorful pictures that flow across the pages. Use of different fonts, angles, and even having the reader turn the book sideways to read the words, keep the reader guessing at what comes next. The author uses onomatopoeia, personification and rhyme at different times throughout the book on an inconsistent basis making each page new. Bill Martin Jr. Picture Book Award of the Kansas Reading Association Nominee 2013

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lidia Alarcon

    Awards: Charlotte Zolotow Award Highly Commended Title (2012) Appropriate grade level(s): pre-k - K Summary: This book discusses where on Earth water comes from. It discusses the water cycle. It also discusses the importance to preserve water, since all that there is on the planet is all we will ever have. Review: I really like this book because it not only teaches about water cycle, but the importance of caring for water. This would be a great book to read on earth day! I enjoyed the blue-tones th Awards: Charlotte Zolotow Award Highly Commended Title (2012) Appropriate grade level(s): pre-k - K Summary: This book discusses where on Earth water comes from. It discusses the water cycle. It also discusses the importance to preserve water, since all that there is on the planet is all we will ever have. Review: I really like this book because it not only teaches about water cycle, but the importance of caring for water. This would be a great book to read on earth day! I enjoyed the blue-tones throughout the book. In-class uses: (1) lesson on water cycle. (2) earth day book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    This graphic and rhythmic poetic book puts facts about water and its need for conservation together to create awareness in a fun way. It illustrates how we use water in a daily basis and it takes the reader from its own house to the wilderness where tigers drink form it. The illustrations are colorful and the text makes it easy and enjoyable to read. The text is one of the engaging factors. The text is enlarged, swapped, flipped, put to the sides just like the flow of water.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Hicks

    The poems within this book were greatly enhanced by the illustrations. I loved the way that the word choice engaged the readers in the concepts of the water cycle. I think this would be a great book to teach about imagery through poem and get students to connect deeper with language through writing.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    I've been thinking about water. This book, through simple illustrations and beautiful words, tells the story of water. It helps to clarify the water cycle and how we all rely on water. Therefore we need to be aware of how much we use, and how much we need to take care to keep it clean.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Slam poetry non fiction I swam in this book Thankful for the papers Serving the irony of calls For a green earth Where trees are ghosts Haunting pages singing Oak and pine poems To teach preservation

  25. 5 out of 5

    Suzie

    The 3 year old and I both loved the illustrations in this book. It flowed very nicely (no pun intended) and had a great message.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sydney Martindale

    This book has some beautiful painting in it. I also like how the book is meant to be read horizontally and vertically. It also has some great information motion on the water cycle.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mrs. Ruigrok

    A simple story about the water...where it comes from, the many forms. A good, but simple book to teach children about the importance of water.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathy (Kindle-aholic)

    Beautiful book - illustrations plus poem - about water. We are big into water conservation, so I thought this book was fantastic.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Josette Abruzzini

    “All the Water in the World ….is all the water in the world.” How’s that for a first line? Charming words and phrases splash about this engaging picture book by George Ella Lyon and Katherine Tillotson. (Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2017) Children will reach for All the Water in the World again and again, and no wonder. Its fresh rhymes feel spontaneous even as they pop up in unexpected places. They tumble elegantly across each page and tickle the listener’s ear. Imaginations will float arou “All the Water in the World ….is all the water in the world.” How’s that for a first line? Charming words and phrases splash about this engaging picture book by George Ella Lyon and Katherine Tillotson. (Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2017) Children will reach for All the Water in the World again and again, and no wonder. Its fresh rhymes feel spontaneous even as they pop up in unexpected places. They tumble elegantly across each page and tickle the listener’s ear. Imaginations will float around the curves of lazy rivers, vanish in evaporating drops of water, and drench mountains and deserts alike. Children will not only learn about the water cycle as they drift along it. They’ll also appreciate its most essential concept - there is only so much water. Delightful illustrations help make the science of the water cycle accessible for every age. They capture and extend the text every so cleverly. All the Water in the World will delight children in the wonders of water. It’ll foster a love for our beautiful planet that will plant seeds in the hearts of this newest generation. That will help keep the water clean and the earth green. Children will be keen to read this book. Josette Abruzzini is a retired 5th grade teacher. Her love for science and picture books continues to delight her! Once a teacher always a teacher.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sunah Chung

    This book is about all the water in the world based on the question of where it comes from. This poetic nonfiction picture book described the water cycle and conservation of water. What I liked were the variety of ways to represent the theme in artistic styles. Illustrations portrayed everything from energetic water waves to the small rain drops. Water was not only represented by one shade of blue, but included different hues of blue and even green. The gradation of the colors represented the dy This book is about all the water in the world based on the question of where it comes from. This poetic nonfiction picture book described the water cycle and conservation of water. What I liked were the variety of ways to represent the theme in artistic styles. Illustrations portrayed everything from energetic water waves to the small rain drops. Water was not only represented by one shade of blue, but included different hues of blue and even green. The gradation of the colors represented the dynamic characteristics of water well. Moreover, the illustrations created the message that living creatures on the earth came from water. For instance, one of the illustrations depicted images of a human, a penguin, and a lizard in the form of waves. I believed that the text was also considered as illustrations in this book. Diverse font sizes and types portrayed the dynamic nature of water. When describing the water cycle, the word "crowded" was used to imply clouds by making the size of each letter different in the form of a cloud. The word "bumps" was not written in a straight line, instead the "m" was enlarged to portray actual bumps. In other words, the texts played a role to illustrate the content as well. Overall, this picture book would provide good experiences in enjoying arts and lessons related to the theme of water.

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