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Think: Straight Talk for Women to Stay Smart in a Dumbed-Down World

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According to Lisa Bloom, the women and girls of today represent a stark paradox. While American women excel in education at every level, they likewise obsessively focus on celebrity media. While women outperform their male counterparts in employment in urban areas for the first time in history, they simultaneously spend countless hours staring in the mirror contemplating p According to Lisa Bloom, the women and girls of today represent a stark paradox. While American women excel in education at every level, they likewise obsessively focus on celebrity media. While women outperform their male counterparts in employment in urban areas for the first time in history, they simultaneously spend countless hours staring in the mirror contemplating plastic surgery. Lisa Bloom fears that women are in danger of spiraling into a nation of dumbed down, tabloid media obsessed, reality TV addicts. Too often, they outsource matters to "experts" and in doing so neglect to truly think for themselves. The solution: Lisa Bloom has the solution and it involves one simple word: Think. In this provocative, entertaining, educational, and thoroughly researched book, Lisa outlines the ways that we as a society, and particularly women, have fallen off the intellectual path, and, very specifically, points to how damaging this has been to us on many levels. Lisa shows us the fallout--but she also provides the solutions for "Reclaiming the Brain God Gave You" and seizing back control of your mind and your life. Think is delivered in a no-nonsense manner that will make you laugh, make you question yourself, make you squirm, but, most important, make you start thinking again.


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According to Lisa Bloom, the women and girls of today represent a stark paradox. While American women excel in education at every level, they likewise obsessively focus on celebrity media. While women outperform their male counterparts in employment in urban areas for the first time in history, they simultaneously spend countless hours staring in the mirror contemplating p According to Lisa Bloom, the women and girls of today represent a stark paradox. While American women excel in education at every level, they likewise obsessively focus on celebrity media. While women outperform their male counterparts in employment in urban areas for the first time in history, they simultaneously spend countless hours staring in the mirror contemplating plastic surgery. Lisa Bloom fears that women are in danger of spiraling into a nation of dumbed down, tabloid media obsessed, reality TV addicts. Too often, they outsource matters to "experts" and in doing so neglect to truly think for themselves. The solution: Lisa Bloom has the solution and it involves one simple word: Think. In this provocative, entertaining, educational, and thoroughly researched book, Lisa outlines the ways that we as a society, and particularly women, have fallen off the intellectual path, and, very specifically, points to how damaging this has been to us on many levels. Lisa shows us the fallout--but she also provides the solutions for "Reclaiming the Brain God Gave You" and seizing back control of your mind and your life. Think is delivered in a no-nonsense manner that will make you laugh, make you question yourself, make you squirm, but, most important, make you start thinking again.

30 review for Think: Straight Talk for Women to Stay Smart in a Dumbed-Down World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    In Think, Lisa Bloom asserts that society has succumbed to our narcissistic, self-indulgent, consumer driven culture. Women today are smart and have more options available to them than ever before, yet what are most of them doing? Applying for The Bachelor, wondering what the hell is going on with Kim Kardashian's marriage or divorce or whatever it is at this point, considering a plethora of cosmetic procedures, and reading online gossip blogs (if they're reading at all). What are they not doing In Think, Lisa Bloom asserts that society has succumbed to our narcissistic, self-indulgent, consumer driven culture. Women today are smart and have more options available to them than ever before, yet what are most of them doing? Applying for The Bachelor, wondering what the hell is going on with Kim Kardashian's marriage or divorce or whatever it is at this point, considering a plethora of cosmetic procedures, and reading online gossip blogs (if they're reading at all). What are they not doing? Using their intellect and first world education to address serious problems, like poverty, hunger, and the repression of women in countries far less fortunate than ours. In other words, they're not thinking. Amen, amen, amen! Obviously, Lisa Bloom is preaching to the choir here and I'm probably not her target audience, but it is certainly nice to feel some affirmation for the intellectual and educational choices I make on a daily basis since they do go against the norm. For example, most women would rather lose their ability to read than their figure (oh, hell no!) or win America's Next Top Model than win the Nobel Peace Prize (my heart weeps). I'm not necessarily giving Think a 5 star based upon its writing style (although it is accessible and often funny) and there are some points that ever-so-slightly rubbed me the wrong way. For example, Bloom asserts that cleaning is not a woman's job (no complaint from me here) and we should simply outsource it to someone else so we have time to read and think. We should also have our children pitch in and do their part. These are not concepts with which I disagree, but they are easier said than done. Many women can't afford to hire a maid (even on a bimonthly basis) and even the most cooperative of teenagers will pitch a hissy fit upon occasion when asked do their part, yet Bloom makes it sound so effortless. However, I am giving it a 5 star because anyone who advocates the need to read and asserts that it's valuable and worthy of our time is someone with a message that today's culture needs to hear. Don't believe me? Check out the NEA statistics from the 2007 To Read or Not to Read report (also quoted in Bloom's book): --80% of American families did not read or buy a book last year --70% of adults have not been to a bookstore in the last 5 years --1/3 of high school graduates never read another book after graduation I've read several reviews that scoff at Bloom taking the time to talk about how to make time for reading books, how to choose books, and how to savor books, as though this is "duh" information and unnecessary. Based upon these statistics, I would argue that such information is urgently needed. I teach in a high school classroom and, when my students come to me, most of them are not readers. They don't know how to make time for reading or even how to pick out a book. Reading is not valued in their households. They don't ask for books for birthdays or Christmas. Their parents don't read. There are too many electronic diversions in their lives. I'm proud to say that, by the time they leave my classroom, most of them are readers. Why? Because I've taught them the simple things: how to create and value quiet time for reading, how to choose good books, and how to reflect upon their responses to literature. That's right--I'm bragging, and I should. Because there's nothing more valuable to leading a productive, happy life than reading. And it's a skill that has to be consistently taught and modeled--and that's what Bloom is doing in those chapters. Sure, if you're reading this review, you may not need it as you've obviously bought into a love of reading if you're on a social media site dedicated to it, but I'm willing to bet you know people who probably do. And Think is for them. I, for one, plan on pushing this book like crack-cocaine to the people in my life who need it--especially teenage girls in my classroom. Whether you agree or disagree with Bloom's liberal views, just the advocacy for thinking is worthy of the time it takes to read the book. Cross posted at This Insignificant Cinder

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ella

    Although the basic message of the book is sound - that American women are wasting too much time on rubbish (eg celebs) and need to pay more attention to the important issues of the world and read more to be informed - the author's incredible arrogance and hypocrisy leave her with no credibility whatsoever. Her blatant misinterpretation of scientific studies to support her (at times) supurious arguments were truly incredible given the title of the book is "think" and one of her key messages is to Although the basic message of the book is sound - that American women are wasting too much time on rubbish (eg celebs) and need to pay more attention to the important issues of the world and read more to be informed - the author's incredible arrogance and hypocrisy leave her with no credibility whatsoever. Her blatant misinterpretation of scientific studies to support her (at times) supurious arguments were truly incredible given the title of the book is "think" and one of her key messages is too research "facts" for yourself. I suggest she researches some of her own "facts". To slam the false images of beauty through makeup and photoshop and then in the next breath to say that "of course" the picture of her on the book is retouched is at best bizarre and at worst shameful. Her audience can only be the rich who can afford not only a housekeeper (presumably her book is not targetted at the women of America who ARE the housekeepers) but also can afford to buy their vegetables pre peeled and chopped - to save time for reading! Never mind the additional cost - both to the consumer but also to the planet of the increased processing and packaging.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cindi (Utah Mom’s Life)

    Originally posted on my blog : http://utahmomslife.blogspot.com/2011... My father-in-law has a simple note pinned to the door that leads to his garage. It reads : THINK. The simple word is meant to help him remember the things he needs to take with him when he leaves the house to run errands. One final reminder to check to make sure he didn't forget the checks he needs to deposit at the bank or the the books he means to return to the library. Lisa Bloom's recently published book Think : Straight T Originally posted on my blog : http://utahmomslife.blogspot.com/2011... My father-in-law has a simple note pinned to the door that leads to his garage. It reads : THINK. The simple word is meant to help him remember the things he needs to take with him when he leaves the house to run errands. One final reminder to check to make sure he didn't forget the checks he needs to deposit at the bank or the the books he means to return to the library. Lisa Bloom's recently published book Think : Straight Talk for Women to Stay Smart in A Dumbed-Down World is a reminder for women to use our brains. Quite simply, to think. You probably already know Lisa Bloom. I didn't. I don't watch television and so I haven't seen her as a legal analyst on shows like The Early Show and Dr. Phil's or on CNN. I just got acquainted with her in this book. Ms. Bloom and I are on opposite sides of the political spectrum. We don't see eye-to-eye on many issues. However, on a few very important things we absolutely agree. First, we both agree that women are smart. Women have amazing brains and are capable of doing most everything. Unfortunately, so many of us fail to use our brains to think. As Bloom points out in her book, too many women become overly enmeshed and concerned with pop culture. We know everything about the personal lives of celebrities, yet ignore the crises and horrors taking place around the world. We are too focused and spend too much time and money on our appearance, even risking our lives and health for dangerous procedures and the perfect tan. And many women think it is actually better to be "hot" than "smart". One third of the population won't read a single book after graduating from high school. SAY IT ISN'T SO! As Bloom writes in her hard-hitting, honest style, it's hard not to be defensive. Really. Even so, her arguments ring true and even though I think I use my brain quite a bit, I know there are always ways I can use it more. Obviously. In spite of our political differences, by the time I got to the section about books (hello! read more good books, people), I felt like Lisa Bloom and I were old friends chatting about our favorites. She and I also have similar parenting styles or at least a style I am attempting to apply in my home. Bloom even mentions my personal favorite parenting expert Wendy Mogel. (Read my review of her fabulous book The Blessing of a Skinned Knee.) Lisa Bloom is funny. She points out the obvious with a wicked wit. I chuckled out loud several times and then read whole sections aloud for Utah Dad's enjoyment and enlightenment. Bloom's advice is brilliant and simple and frankly rather straight forward if you think about it. Following her suggestions and using your brain more will help you be happier, smarter and will even help the world be a better place. You have a brain. Use it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jillian

    This is one of those books that may change your life. I've always respected Bloom and was excited to learn that she's a bookish, adventure-seeking, vegan-environmentalist. Perhaps because she and I have so much in common, her words spoke to me. I ended up underlining about half of the book, and although I don't have the patience to write down every fact or quote that I loved, I agreed with 99 percent it (except for the anti-plastic surgery section). I feel that people should enhance whatever the This is one of those books that may change your life. I've always respected Bloom and was excited to learn that she's a bookish, adventure-seeking, vegan-environmentalist. Perhaps because she and I have so much in common, her words spoke to me. I ended up underlining about half of the book, and although I don't have the patience to write down every fact or quote that I loved, I agreed with 99 percent it (except for the anti-plastic surgery section). I feel that people should enhance whatever they please, and it's their business. After finishing this book I've cut out two of the three shows that I religiously watch: The Real Housewives of Orange County and New York. I agree with Bloom, even if I'm watching them to laugh with my friends, I'm supporting something awful that grows stronger everyday. And although I'm an avid reader, I've decided to start reading the NY & LA Times everyday, and will be better about tuning into NPR rather than my just my audio-books. I used to become frustrated with the hypocrisy in the news, but I need to stay informed. Because I already vote, volunteer, read promiscuously, and take care of myself and my relationships, most of the book just reconfirmed my ideology. However, since I'm about to launch a new business, I'll have less spare time; so I'm glad that I read this when I did. Bloom's advice on weaning yourself off time-wasting technology, making reading a social activity, checking your own facts, and her recipes and reading list were perfect for me. My favorite words of wisdom: "What's the difference between a professional cleaning your office and a professional cleaning your home?" (In her Reclaim Time to Think section.) "Become intimately acquainted with the prewashed, precut section in produce." (In the Cooking: Keep It Simple...Really Simple section.) "Those who do not read are no better off than those who cannot." Chinese proverb "Not choice, but habit rules the unreflecting herd." --William Wordsworth "One of the best things about men is their confidence, their rightness, their ability to go with their gut and produce. ... However, one of the most paralyzing things for a woman is her doubt .... Doubt is like an anchor that keeps women rooted in murky waters of disapproval ... I believe men are happier than women because of their sense of self-approval." --Rochelle Schieck. "The antidote for fifty enemies is one friend." --Aristotle "The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who in time of great moral crises maintain their neutrality." --Dante "The happiest people in the study had the most substantive conversations (current affairs, philosophy, religion, education)." "One of the most radical acts you can do is to send a girl to school in a country that devalues her." "Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony." --Gandhi And my all-time favorite quote from Bloom in the book, "Of course readers are more engaged in our communities, of course we volunteer more, and of course we're more compassionate. We have opened ourselves to the world in all its blazing complexity--the villains with hearts of gold, the heroines with their fatal flaws. We sit with the long story, we hear out the full argument. We understand subtlety, and we yearn for depth." In conclusion, an AMAZING book and I look forward to reading more news, checking out the books on the reading list that I've missed, and making my life simpler and smarter:)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Colleenish

    I quickly changed back and forth from hating this book to being okay with it. The whole idea is that most women are not reading and thinking enough. How does writing a book help solve that problem? This has to be all about making money then, yes? Also, the writer was talking about thinking, but a lot of the statistics and examples she used were very biased and rarely told the whole story. That really frustrated me. She doesn't think women should waste their time doing housework, where I don't al I quickly changed back and forth from hating this book to being okay with it. The whole idea is that most women are not reading and thinking enough. How does writing a book help solve that problem? This has to be all about making money then, yes? Also, the writer was talking about thinking, but a lot of the statistics and examples she used were very biased and rarely told the whole story. That really frustrated me. She doesn't think women should waste their time doing housework, where I don't always think that is a waste of time (I do some of my best thinking while cleaning), and I haven't totally rejected gender roles. But...there are some inequalities, and maybe it is time for change. The redeeming factor for me is the author's heart for the poor and marginalized, and her love of books. I couldn't help agreeing and latching on to these points. I loved her book recommendations. The way this book was put together seemed sloppy to me, but in that sloppiness, I found interesting facts and ideas. Not a total wash.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    I first heard about this book via social media - something along the lines of what to say to a young girl you meet. Hint, it's not "Oh what a pretty dress!" Lisa lays it all out there - we are a nation of people getting dumber every day. Slowly, but surely, we're separating ourselves from the "real" news and following the masses into stupidity. Why? Honestly, I think we're overconditioned to know that 'pretty' girls or 'dumb' girls get what they want. They have all the money, all the glitz and gla I first heard about this book via social media - something along the lines of what to say to a young girl you meet. Hint, it's not "Oh what a pretty dress!" Lisa lays it all out there - we are a nation of people getting dumber every day. Slowly, but surely, we're separating ourselves from the "real" news and following the masses into stupidity. Why? Honestly, I think we're overconditioned to know that 'pretty' girls or 'dumb' girls get what they want. They have all the money, all the glitz and glamor, and all the guys. Problem is, most of us aren't the pretty, dumb type. We're smart, down-to-earth, witty and courageous. We think for ourselves and act on our notions of right and wrong. Or do we? I found this to be an excellent read and it made me do just what the title says - Think. I'm not as caught up in reality TV or fashion or celeb gossip to make me part of the mindless hoard. But...there are way too many things in my life that I don't know about, things that I either let my husband take care of or just ignore. I'm honestly ashamed of that now. While I was reading, I couldn't help but think of something my mom told me years ago - "If you want to get something, play dumb." See, I graduated at the top of my class, got fantastic grades, and probably intimidated the hell out the guys I went to school with. I was proud of being smart. But, as time went by, I felt moer like I was being a smart ass than being smart. Talking with others made me feel that I should tone it down a bit because I was making them feel bad. Since I didn't want others to feel that way, I did that. Now I feel like my brain's turning to mush and I should have stayed off this path eons ago. Think differently about things you hear. Look at it from various points of view. If you're not completely familiar with something, learn more about it. If you know a lot about something else, share it with others. It's only through expanding our own minds that we'll be able to take back the intelligence we all have. As Lisa notes, we have more access to more information than ever before - use it to your advantage! If you're reading this, it's because you read books. Reading is one of the best ways to increase your capacity for knowledge and it tends to make you smarter in the process. One tip of Lisa's that I REALLY have to learn - if the reading you're doing is painful, put down the book and walk away. Your time is more valuable than finishing a book. This book - it's worth your time. I recommend it to every woman who feels that womankind is dumbing down a horrendous path to self-obliteration. Take back your smarts!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kerfe

    The breezy tone ("you go girl") was a little off-putting to me, but considering the fact that much critic-endorsed and more literary writing leaves me unmoved, it's probably my problem. The targeted audience is, sadly, pretty much all of us: the self-absorbed whiners who waste time on celebrity lifstyles, agonize about not meeting unrealistic societal standards of beauty, dawdle away hours on electronic gadgets, refuse to address or even learn about the real problems and issues that confront our The breezy tone ("you go girl") was a little off-putting to me, but considering the fact that much critic-endorsed and more literary writing leaves me unmoved, it's probably my problem. The targeted audience is, sadly, pretty much all of us: the self-absorbed whiners who waste time on celebrity lifstyles, agonize about not meeting unrealistic societal standards of beauty, dawdle away hours on electronic gadgets, refuse to address or even learn about the real problems and issues that confront our communities, nation, and world, minimize our intelligence and accomplishments and pretend to be airheads so people (ie boys/men) will like us. The ones who can never find time for activities with some point or purpose. As Bloom says: "You know who you are." "Think" attempts to move girls and women out of the cycle of appearing, playing, and acting dumb. There's a lot of self-congratulatory bragging--but then again Bloom IS an attractive successful Ivy-League educated lawyer and TV personality--and it IS her book. I don't agree with all of her opinions and/or advice, but then again she actively advocates reading and engaging with those whose thoughts and opinions differ from yours, which has been shown in studies to produce better citizens. And anyone who starts a section titled "Read Constantly, and Read the Good Stuff" with a Chinese proverb--"Those who do not read are no better off than those who cannot"--and then quotes extensively from a National Endowment for the Arts report that concludes "These cold statistics confirm something that most readers know but have been mostly reluctant to declare as fact--books change lives for the better"--well, that author has her heart and mind in the right place.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Roxy

    I read this book cover to cover in one day (granted, I was on vacation). But I really couldn't put it down! It appealed to my humanitarian senses and advocated something I'm already passionate about: reading. It emphasizes the choices we make in the reading material and social media in which we choose to invest our time and attention and the impact of those individual choices on our society as a whole. This book exposes the average American's solipsistic views on politics and world issues, often I read this book cover to cover in one day (granted, I was on vacation). But I really couldn't put it down! It appealed to my humanitarian senses and advocated something I'm already passionate about: reading. It emphasizes the choices we make in the reading material and social media in which we choose to invest our time and attention and the impact of those individual choices on our society as a whole. This book exposes the average American's solipsistic views on politics and world issues, often revealed through sheer ignorance on these matters like climate change and international politics. For example, many people believe that our country made substantial gains in the women's rights movement when Hillary Clinton became a presidential candidate. However the reality is that the U.S. is living in the dark ages as far as the women's rights movement where other countries are concerned. Many other nations have had female leaders - for decades! And that's just one small example. By contrast the Average American female can exhort the details of the most recent failed Kardashian marriage with the aplomb of a Ph.D. doctoral dissertation. That's ludicrous and in all honesty - embarrassing! The author expounds on several examples of where our choices in literature and media manifest into the shortcomings of our education system and even our day-to-day interactions with each other as exemplified by the "garbage in garbage out" principle and the alarming increase in narcissism in our culture. She does so with candor, wit, and sensitivity. I found myself humbled by the sheer volume of information I did not know with regard to world politics. But this book also motivated and inspired me to actively seek these issues out. It left me wanting more. Fortunately Lisa provides accessible solutions to our junk media habits. She offers her recommendations on everything including TheWeek.com versus Twitter for your world news as well as a cache of other books and films. There is an appendix of recommended reading at the back of the book and I found at least twenty other titles both fiction and nonfiction and one movie (Hotel Rwanda) that I immediately put on hold at the library. I have to say, though, one glaring exception to her advice on how to find great books to read is her ommision of this site: Good Reads! (I just became a fan of her on this site.) She does however advocate her own website: www.think.tv which I also subscribe to. I highly recommend this book to everyone, especially women, but to men as well because the advice is, quite frankly, universal. Where Lisa Bloom indicates that women might spend too much of their precious time on tabloid media and reality TV in my opinion men are equally guilty of wasting their precious time and deserving of the same tools to make better decisions about the types of books, magazines, and films they allocate their time and brain power to. We are lucky, by accident of birth or fortune, to live in a country where we have these options and the freedom to act on them if we so choose.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I've named this one the "privileged white lady book." I loved Bloom's article about how to talk to young girls that appears on Huffington Post so I was excited to read this book. And then 50 pages in I was so insulted I nearly quit reading. Maybe my problem is simply that I don't think US Weekly is at the heart of all the worlds problems (which seems to be the premise of this book). My biggest issue with this book was that Bloom didn't acknowledge her own privilege. The most egregiousness of whi I've named this one the "privileged white lady book." I loved Bloom's article about how to talk to young girls that appears on Huffington Post so I was excited to read this book. And then 50 pages in I was so insulted I nearly quit reading. Maybe my problem is simply that I don't think US Weekly is at the heart of all the worlds problems (which seems to be the premise of this book). My biggest issue with this book was that Bloom didn't acknowledge her own privilege. The most egregiousness of which is her "solution" for creating more time to think. It's easy...wait for it...just hire a cleaning person! You only have to not eat out a few times a week in order for afford one! Gross. My next issue is that Think felt oddly, well, sexist. This problem exists in many self help books aimed at underrepresented group of people (women, people of color, etc). It's easy to slip into a "blame the victim" mentality. Think definitely didn't escape this pitfall. I found myself yelling things like, "um, that's not really telling the whole story." Or, "Men do that, too. Why is she singling out women." Finally, and perhaps most ironically, I felt like I was being talked down to. Like Bloom was assuming a very low level of intellect or education for the readership of this book. Like Oprah, but on her very worst day. I will say that some of the stats were eye opening and that I'm pretty interested in the suggested reading list in the back of the book...but other than that I was mostly just insulted. It had some interesting tidbits but overall, I think you can skip this one.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I would love to have lunch with Ms. Bloom. We would have so much to talk about... So many times reading this book I had to stop and doublecheck the cover to make sure I hadn't written it. (I didn't. Ms. Bloom's picture is very prominent and we don't really look anything alike.) But seriously, sentences like the following could have come out of my mouth (and several actually have!): "It doesn't matter what everyone else says, even everyone else of your political persuasion. Mull it over yourself - I would love to have lunch with Ms. Bloom. We would have so much to talk about... So many times reading this book I had to stop and doublecheck the cover to make sure I hadn't written it. (I didn't. Ms. Bloom's picture is very prominent and we don't really look anything alike.) But seriously, sentences like the following could have come out of my mouth (and several actually have!): "It doesn't matter what everyone else says, even everyone else of your political persuasion. Mull it over yourself - deeply. Go to your core principles. Examine the facts..." "My fervent desire...is to provoke my audience into realizing, 'I never thought about it that way.'" "Be skeptical of what the crowd is doing, be even more skeptical of what powerful people tell us, dig up all the facts and appraise them objectively, and, then and only then, reach my conclusion. Because things aren't always what they first appear to be." "I don't know what patriotism has to do with fact-checking." "We have to stop confusing home team pride with facts. Our natural warm stirrings for our homeland does not mean we're number one at everything..." "Reading is the cure for what ails us: ignorance." "When it comes to your life, you are the expert, and you are capable of reading and deciphering data." This woman shares my disdain for those "Complete Idiots' Guide" books and the "Fill-in-the-Blank for Dummies" series! I've said for years that I refuse to buy a book that calls me stupid before I even open the cover. Ms. Bloom calls on women to wake up, recognize there's more to life than what Kim Kardashian wore yesterday or which Hollywood starlet is dating John Mayer this week, and use our considerable energy and resources to learn more about the world around us and do some good in that world. She has little sympathy for first-world excuses and insists that we can all read a few more books and a few less tabloids, care a little less about our physical appearance and a little more about global issues that effect millions, and take responsibility for our own lives and happiness. The first half of the book sets out the problems: the focus on being "hot" rather than being smart, the celebrity-obsessed tabloid media that even creeps into the "real" news outlets more and more, the inward focus that distracts from looking outward into the world. The second half proposes some simplistic, but solid, solutions: 1) Reclaim Time to Think 2) Read Constantly, and Read the Good Stuff 3) Use Your Newfound Time and Knowledge to Take Charge of Your Life 4) Engage, Connect, Take a Stand, Act I'd give it a 4.5 if I could (I dinged her a half a point for some needless swipes at Dan Quayle and several other prominent Republicans, though she did spew some disdain on John Edwards as well). Her liberal political views are apparent, but that doesn't negate the passion behind her efforts and the validity of her points. Women of the world, THINK! For more book reviews, come visit my blog, Build Enough Bookshelves.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    The first thing that struck me about the intro, is that the author touts "This is not a self help book"...but, really, a large majority of it is just that. And with any book of that nature, it is riddled with author bias and a desire for you to act or think as they do. However, sprinkled throughout the book, there are good lessons that should be strongly considered for implementation in your daily life. As an avid reader, her suggestion to read more is something I am already quite passionate abo The first thing that struck me about the intro, is that the author touts "This is not a self help book"...but, really, a large majority of it is just that. And with any book of that nature, it is riddled with author bias and a desire for you to act or think as they do. However, sprinkled throughout the book, there are good lessons that should be strongly considered for implementation in your daily life. As an avid reader, her suggestion to read more is something I am already quite passionate about. But, it did make me consider the amount of "fluff" reading I do, compared to more substantial reading. The author also says this is about women trying to be "smart", but I think her message is really universal across genders. Our men are just as "stupid" in today's world, as the women. She also stresses that women are outperforming men in education...but if you look at the top 10 Bachelor's degrees award, they are in the soft, social sciences. In professional programs, the numbers are still 50/50. I found it interesting that in one chapter she would stress how girls were being left behind, educationally, 20-30 years ago and then goes on to cheer how that has changed. Unfortunately, I think that it has come at the expense of our young boys. We have swung to far in the other direction and are now ignoring boys, as girls had previously been ignored. I did like her suggestions for creating more "me" time for stimulating your brain. I also agree that women run themselves ragged...being the full-time housekeeper and child-entertainer. I was expecting her to rail on men for not participating more and she really surprised me. Her suggestions were very fair and logical and I think more people should try them. At the end of the day, her book was nothing new. Americans, on the whole, do know more about pop culture than current political affairs, and that is sad and tragic. Maybe we should be focusing on an education system that is dumbing down the american youth by training them to pass tests, rather than think critically. Maybe the fact that everyone gets an "A" because we don't want to damage the self-esteem of kids is a problem. Maybe children need to be challenged, and god forbid, fail everyone once in awhile before a parent swoops in to tell them how special and perfect they are. Maybe if we quit cutting school days and stepped-up the daily curriculum, our kids could compete with other countries. So while I think its great to continue to challenge yourself and ensure your kids are challenged in the home, there is a much bigger problem at hand and that is how devalued education in this country has become. Thank you for writing this book and trying to make people better. Though I decline your recommendation to read the New York times daily, I will stick with the Wall Street Journal.

  12. 5 out of 5

    She

    I was really excited to read this book after reading what it was about and watching her intro video. I thought the first half of the book was very good, important, and contained lots of useful information. It was quite interesting. However, the book headed south when we got to the "solutions" part. The second half of the book is all about why you should be a reader (duh!). It goes to great lengths to explain to you how to fit reading into your schedule, when to read, what to read, where to get b I was really excited to read this book after reading what it was about and watching her intro video. I thought the first half of the book was very good, important, and contained lots of useful information. It was quite interesting. However, the book headed south when we got to the "solutions" part. The second half of the book is all about why you should be a reader (duh!). It goes to great lengths to explain to you how to fit reading into your schedule, when to read, what to read, where to get books, etc. It was quite ridiculous. Did she not realize that this portion of the book is just preaching to the choir? Only us readers are reading an entire half of a book about why we should be readers. Her message, which we readers already know, does not reach the intended audience - who are the non-readers! So 3 stars is the best I could give on this. The first half is quite interesting, the second half is an unnecessary lecture of why you should be a reader (only you already ARE a reader, which is why you have the book in your hand in the first place... it is not probable that non-readers are picking one book to read and it just so happens to be hers). I recommend reading the first half...stop when you get to the solutions part. The entire solutions part is summed up in one piece of advice: be an avid reader. Oh, one more thing... she is a big fan of (and recommended reading) "Three Cups of Tea" by Greg Mortenson. I guess she needs to take her own advice about reading and read "Three Cups of Deceit" by Jon Krakauer to read that Greg's book/work was fraud!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I grabbed this book from PG Library’s “New” shelf. I totally agree with Bloom’s thesis: We all (and I add men as well as women) need to THINK more. Since I’m not a television watcher, I’ve never seen Lisa Bloom. Her credentials, listed on the book jacket, are impressive. Her writing did and did not impress me. She has some great ideas and suggestions, but she uses a bit much “vernacular” for my taste. To put it bluntly, she throws around a lot of mild “swear words” which I found offensive. And w I grabbed this book from PG Library’s “New” shelf. I totally agree with Bloom’s thesis: We all (and I add men as well as women) need to THINK more. Since I’m not a television watcher, I’ve never seen Lisa Bloom. Her credentials, listed on the book jacket, are impressive. Her writing did and did not impress me. She has some great ideas and suggestions, but she uses a bit much “vernacular” for my taste. To put it bluntly, she throws around a lot of mild “swear words” which I found offensive. And while she preaches thinking for yourself, she puts forth her liberal agenda quite freely. Sometimes I agree with her, sometimes I don’t. I guess I’m just THINKING for myself! That said, her suggestions of how to find more time to read (delegate the mundane work, dump TV and computer networking/socializing time, etc.) are good, and she gives suggestions of what to read (New York Times, local paper, an appendix of books both fiction and non-fiction) and how to read and the importance of research and fact checking. My recommendation: Skim the first part, “The Problem,” quickly, and take a bit more time with the second part, “Solutions.” Don’t feel bowled over by her strong personality and use what you like.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Carlson

    I didn't know who Lisa Bloom was until a week ago. Her mom is Gloria Allred, the high-profile attorney who usually wears red. I wasn't going to listen to Bloom give an interview with a Mpls radio station because I had mixed feeling about her mom. However, it became clear within a few moments Lisa is fascinated and bewildered by our culture. This book will give you many facts you were not aware of; if you have a certain opinion about Angelina Jolie and Jimmy Carter it will be altered; if you belie I didn't know who Lisa Bloom was until a week ago. Her mom is Gloria Allred, the high-profile attorney who usually wears red. I wasn't going to listen to Bloom give an interview with a Mpls radio station because I had mixed feeling about her mom. However, it became clear within a few moments Lisa is fascinated and bewildered by our culture. This book will give you many facts you were not aware of; if you have a certain opinion about Angelina Jolie and Jimmy Carter it will be altered; if you believe Lisa was raised in a home with high-society parents you would be wrong as I wouldn't have minded having her Mom and Dad; if you believe the United States fosters a culture which promotes smart, capable, independent women in comparison with other countries you would be wrong. The other countries are way ahead of us. This book affirmed I am doing the right thing by moving in an uncharted direction and confirmed how much I will be passing along the term "Think" to everyone I can think of.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    I am not, as we say, the intended audience. I downloaded Bloom's book on a whim after seeing a Facebook meme I liked about how to speak to little girls (don't tell them they're pretty; ask them what they're reading or what they think!). But I got a kick out of this book. The audio version captured my attention like few others do (I'd finished the interminable George Packer audiobook while cooking dinner and this one began playing while my hands were busy ... then I couldn't stop - it was like a I am not, as we say, the intended audience. I downloaded Bloom's book on a whim after seeing a Facebook meme I liked about how to speak to little girls (don't tell them they're pretty; ask them what they're reading or what they think!). But I got a kick out of this book. The audio version captured my attention like few others do (I'd finished the interminable George Packer audiobook while cooking dinner and this one began playing while my hands were busy ... then I couldn't stop - it was like a breath of fresh air!) I enjoyed the chapters in which Bloom promotes reading - not celeb rags like People or In Style but serious engaged daily reading of books and newspapers. She was speaking to the converted here, but I can imagine how an eager or not so eager listener might take hear these lengthy, strident, emphatic instructions from Bloom on how to live, what to know, how to organize your day, and what to read (everything). She might have lost a few "readers," but I hope changes the mind of a few wayward young women.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

    Amazing. Not only funny, this book is informative, provoking (in the best way), scathing and helpful. But most of all, Bloom made me think. My favorite takeaways: 1) The reading list - Not comprehensive by any means since these are Bloom's favorites, but still useful! 2) The un-recipes 3) Causing me to subscribe to the New York Times. 4) Me resolving to read at least one non-fiction book a month. Highly recommend this book - regardless of your sex. Life-changing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This book starts off rocky for me, beginning with the usage of a lot of facts, such as how European and Asian high schoolers outperform American high schoolers, without citing any references. She might perhaps cite those references in later chapters (can't really remember), but come on, you need to do so at the first reference. Then she starts discussing a whole bunch of various topics which all seem to indicate that women are too vain, too celebrity obsessed, and not knowledgeable enough. Some This book starts off rocky for me, beginning with the usage of a lot of facts, such as how European and Asian high schoolers outperform American high schoolers, without citing any references. She might perhaps cite those references in later chapters (can't really remember), but come on, you need to do so at the first reference. Then she starts discussing a whole bunch of various topics which all seem to indicate that women are too vain, too celebrity obsessed, and not knowledgeable enough. Some sections are given decent coverage while others leave something to be desired. For example, she has a section about Dan Quayle and concludes that he is possibly the reason why we aren't ashamed of being so stupid. Uggghhhh. The book gets significantly better when it starts discussing the things that might have fallen off our radar. So perhaps I have never even heard of Heidi Montag, but how much do I know about the Khmer Rouge? Errrr ... ok, feeling schooled. I may not waste my time watching Jersey Shore, but I certainly am wasting time (probably looking at shoes online, which is my particular vice that she surprisingly doesn't devote all that much space to) when I should be thinking more globally and paying more attention to what is happening around the world. I get it, read the NY Times more, read non fiction along with those fantasy novels I so enjoy. Beside this advice, I didn't find the solutions portion of the book all that helpful, which is mostly about how to make time to read more. Probably because I am incredibly lucky to have an awesome husband who helps out with our son and around the house and is the primary cook. That and the fact that I already watch very little television and spend 0 minutes a day reading celebrity gossip (in fact, this book made me consume more celebrity gossip than I have in months). Perhaps this is naive, but in my opinion, if people care to read, they make the time to read. Even if only a little a day. I mean, even my mother-in-law who works full time, cooks everyday, cleans, bakes cookies and other homemade goods for Christmas presents, etc (while her mostly useless husband watches tv), still finds time every single darn day to read the Bible. People don't need to learn how to make more time to read, they just need to be motivated and interested to do so. Not to say that the solutions section is entirely pointless, as I guess what she does drive home is that having a busy life is no excuse to not read, and that you shouldn't feel guilty for reading, even if you have a partner and children ... there are ways to share your love of reading with them. Where this book really shines is when she shares some of her experiences, such as her travels visiting schools in Laos and experiencing some of the culture of Berber women. She covers at a glance a lot of topics but then provides a nice reading list for more in depth study. Mostly, I liked when she stopped focusing on what we think too much about and spent more time discussing what we should be thinking about instead. The thing I will say about this book is that it moves me to do something. That certainly makes it a worthwhile read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tam Lontok

    In evaluating Lisa Bloom's intention for "Think: Straight Talk for Women to Stay Smart in a Dumbed-Down World," her purpose was to create awareness and compassion for the world around us and encouraging us all to raise our ecological intelligence. Her goal was clear, however, I found the beginning of the book to be inundated with numerous statistics and heavily focused on how American women only care about celebrities, gossip, vanity, and live in a solipsistic world. My question is, "How accurat In evaluating Lisa Bloom's intention for "Think: Straight Talk for Women to Stay Smart in a Dumbed-Down World," her purpose was to create awareness and compassion for the world around us and encouraging us all to raise our ecological intelligence. Her goal was clear, however, I found the beginning of the book to be inundated with numerous statistics and heavily focused on how American women only care about celebrities, gossip, vanity, and live in a solipsistic world. My question is, "How accurate are these statistics and where is this sample taken?" It appeared to me that the book was definitely targeted to a specific demographic. For the targeted population, I appreciated her sharing the oppression of women in different parts of the world and questioned all of us to critically think of what we can do to come to aid. With her wonderful experience and background, I wish I was able to peek more into her thought process for additional ideas and solutions to be implemented. Possibly less on the problem and more on what we can do? Throughout the book, she emphasized how reading is vital and how it should be incorporated into our daily lives. As much as I agree with her on this subject, I found her argument only reemphasizing that this book is made for a specific population and economic status. Growing up in a culture where the American Declaration of Independence states, “All men are created equal,” it is difficult to face the reality of the current situation. We would all like to believe our children are given the best type of education and resources to succeed and pursue their dreams and goals. Yet it is disheartening knowing these students are not even given a chance once they are born. It is not a choice for them, but a path they have to endure and depending on their strength and resiliency, they may find measures and opportunities to reach their goals. Otherwise, it is not an equal and fair opportunity for all. This goes without saying that some kids are not reading due to lack of resources, proper assessments, and attention. How could they build their interest in reading if they are not confident in their own reading abilities at a young age? Overall, Lisa Bloom's purpose is well-intended and it is to encourage all of us to continue to practice awareness and mindfulness. It is to remind us how important it is to think more at a global scale and in return, gratefulness and compassion towards others.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nilagia

    This book is a cautionary tale of the results of consuming a steady diet of junk media: squandered time, and apathy and ignorance about the issues that really matter. Filled with horrifying examples of "dumb Americans" pitted against real world problems such as child slavery, it's enough to make you check yourself before the next time you sit down to watch a reality TV show -- even if you do realize it's junk. She focuses on women, because let's face it, it's incredibly profitable to market fash This book is a cautionary tale of the results of consuming a steady diet of junk media: squandered time, and apathy and ignorance about the issues that really matter. Filled with horrifying examples of "dumb Americans" pitted against real world problems such as child slavery, it's enough to make you check yourself before the next time you sit down to watch a reality TV show -- even if you do realize it's junk. She focuses on women, because let's face it, it's incredibly profitable to market fashion and celebrity gossip magazines and makeover shows. Bloom challenges the reader to make time for the "vegetables" in your life if you're not already doing so -- read the international news, do your own taxes and start managing your own finances, stop making excuses for why you mentally check out at the end of the day. Although I feel fortunate that I didn't find too much of the information in this book to be mind-blowing (if you really weren't keeping up with news in the past decade, you might), it is a good reminder to really think about how you spend your time, especially with media consumption. She argues that media companies create awful media for women because enough us aren't standing up for something better. It's a call to get off your butt, pay attention, and devote the time to things that are actually worth your time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sara Gottfried

    I love Lisa Bloom (and her brave publisher) who decided to go against the grain and write about the importance of holding a high bar for ourselves while living in a culture that loves tabloids. Thank you, Sister Lisa!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    http://mariesbookgarden.blogspot.com/... I first heard of Lisa Bloom when I read a fantastic article she wrote for the Huffington Post: "How to Talk to Little Girls." I knew I needed to read her book. Bloom is the feisty, bright daughter of a feisty, bright mother, pioneering and well-known lawyer Gloria Allred. Allred trained her daughter well--to be an advocate for equality and to stand up for herself and the downtrodden. The book is divided into two parts. The first part, "The Problem," delves i http://mariesbookgarden.blogspot.com/... I first heard of Lisa Bloom when I read a fantastic article she wrote for the Huffington Post: "How to Talk to Little Girls." I knew I needed to read her book. Bloom is the feisty, bright daughter of a feisty, bright mother, pioneering and well-known lawyer Gloria Allred. Allred trained her daughter well--to be an advocate for equality and to stand up for herself and the downtrodden. The book is divided into two parts. The first part, "The Problem," delves into the question of why we are all so dumbed down nowadays, especially women. She talks about the U.S. chest beating that we are "number one," when in fact we are not...in so many areas. One of those areas is the status of women and the numbers of women who represent us in the political arena. Although conditions are better here for women than in many other countries, we are far from number one. The World Economic Forum's 2009 Global Gender Gap Reports puts us at #31 because of our women's "stagnation in the political empowerment index." And 80 nations surpass the U.S. in the percentage of women holding elective office. You read that right: instead of being Number One, we lag behind 80 nations! Why are we not up in arms about this? We're too busy spending a fortune on cosmetics and plastic surgery, reading about celebrity gossip, and watching reality TV shows. Wasting our lives away. (When I say "we," I'm referring to Americans in general and women in particular.) As Bloom discusses, we devalue education, proudly read books that proclaim "Cooking for Dummies," and are more likely to know who Katy Perry is than who is the prime minister of Canada. For example, take U.S. Weekly or Yahoo's web site, OMG! Bloom reports that U.S. Weekly had 800,000 subscribers in 2003, and now has nearly 2 million. Yet they estimate about 10 readers per subscriber, as many offices, nail salons, and gyms carry the magazine. According to Bloom's statistics, in 2007 American women averaged $12,000 per year on cosmetics and salon purchases (and 42 percent of the worldwide total). I find that number to be truly staggering! We should be socking that money away for our retirement, or traveling around the world. Now that is really showing how dumb we are. Bloom is a passionate vegetarian, and she makes an excellent case for us all to go meatless. I knew that raising livestock contributed to climate change, but she quotes a 2006 report by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization that concluded that worldwide livestock farming is the #1 cause of climate change than all the cars, trains, planes, and boats in the world. The more meat we eat, the more we are degrading our planet. As a legal analyst and reporter, Bloom talks about how much time she has been forced to cover missing stories of "pretty white girls," and if a missing child is not white or pretty, or even male, the media will not cover the story. This was not true in Oregon when Kyron Horman went missing over a year ago...but many made the excellent case that his story got way more attention than those of missing children of color. Not that we shouldn't care about Kyron Horman, but shouldn't we also care about all the children who go missing? Why don't we care as equally passionately about all the children sold into prostitution around the world? The U.S. media only wants to cover the "pretty white girls," and the American population are drawn to those stories, in a horrific Catch-22. In another absurd example of our bizarre focus on the celebrity culture, Bloom discusses all the amazing humanitarian and philanthropic work Angelina Jolie has done throughout her career. But what makes the news? Her relationship with Brad Pitt and her supposed fights with Jennifer Aniston. Or Jolie's former nanny who says she's a neglectful mother. Or what she wore yesterday or where she vacationed. That's all people seem to care about...not the fact that she started working on behalf of refugees in 2000...has visited countries ravaged by poverty such as Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Cambodia, Pakistan, Namibia, and Kenya. She's even visited asylum seekers here in the U.S. I'm sure that Jolie realizes that she can attract more attention to her cause by giving the public what it wants. Just a few days ago she got the media all excited by saying that what she was most excited about that evening (after the Golden Globes) was to go home to bed with Brad. Celebrities are narcissistic. Yes. But in the case of Angelina Jolie, there's more to her than meets the eye. But does the American public care? No, it doesn't seem to. Jumping in to Part 2, Bloom gives us her recommendations for reclaiming our brains...such as carving out time in our lives to think, make simple food for your family and don't kill yourself by slaving over meals for hours, and hire someone else to do your housework (even if you have to cut corners elsewhere) so you can reserve time for yourself. She's very adamant on the housecleaner front, and of course I ask myself, what about the option to just not live in a perfectly clean house all the time? She seems to have a very relaxed, funny parenting style...for example, interpreting "I'm bored!" as "How may I be of assistance?" "Oh great!" I said, eagerly. "Here's a list of things for you to do. Start with cleaning your room. Next, wash the windows. There's some crud baked on to this pan that really needs a good scrubbing to get it off. Did you rewrite that homework assignment to bring up your grade? How's that thank you to Grandma coming along? Honey? Where'd you go?" I've already begun applying this technique. Yesterday when my 15-year-old complained about loading the dishwasher, I began to give him a list of all the things I planned to get done that evening, and I told him he could help me with those if he wanted to. Worked like a charm. She's adamant about not allowing kids into your bed. Well, it's a good thing I'm confident in my own parenting philosophy to know what to ignore and what to take in. I still have a five-year-old who crawls into bed with me around 6:15 a.m., and he usually comes downstairs and sleeps on our floor until then (but not in our bed). It won't last forever, and I do love my morning cuddles. I suppose Bloom wouldn't have approved of my nursing through the night when my babies were little, but I don't care. I was a working mom, and it helped me bond with my kids. Bloom exhorts women to READ constantly, and the good stuff. Clearly, I agree with that advice, although it also shocks me to read that 80 percent of Americans did not read a book last year. She has tons of reading recommendations, many of which (but not all) I've already read. She's a big fan of Half the Sky by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl DuWunn, as am I, and has a reading list in the appendix. She tells us to use our newfound time and knowledge to take care of our lives. Look things up if you're curious. Exercise. Have more sex! Hang out with girlfriends--they are great for your health (as is the sex!). Volunteer in your community and take a stand. Finally, Bloom talks about how lucky we are to live in the good ol' US of A, with the freedoms we have and the privilege. We need to take advantage of these things and BACK AWAY from the cotton candy nutritionless junk food media. I certainly have been more careful not to click on the tabloid-style internet news since reading this book. What a waste of time it all is. Think!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I truly appreciated the premise behind this book, so it pains me (somewhat) to say it felt... immature in its execution. Maybe I was just the wrong audience and would have gained more from it had I been much younger and more shallow.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Wendy Skultety (gimmethatbook.com)

    I would like to thank Vanguard Press and Goodreads for offering this book in the FirstReads contest. As you can tell, I'm a happy winner :) Lisa Bloom is the daughter of Gloria Allred (a fact marveled on by all who read my book jacket). Bloom wrote this book to encourage girls and women to THINK about things, and consider them in a new light. Not exactly a "question authority" kind of thing, just a "why are you conforming to stereotypes" thing. Her parents raised her to be a free thinker, challen I would like to thank Vanguard Press and Goodreads for offering this book in the FirstReads contest. As you can tell, I'm a happy winner :) Lisa Bloom is the daughter of Gloria Allred (a fact marveled on by all who read my book jacket). Bloom wrote this book to encourage girls and women to THINK about things, and consider them in a new light. Not exactly a "question authority" kind of thing, just a "why are you conforming to stereotypes" thing. Her parents raised her to be a free thinker, challenging Bloom's assumptions about the world, and encouraging her to be her own person. In chapter one she discusses her childhood, (fondly remembering how she was the First Girl to take wood shop), reminisces about things she learned from her Mom's law practice, and shares how her Dad always admonished her to THINK, thereby provoking her response of "I never thought of it that way before". In the second chapter she discusses how we, as Americans, practice not-thinking, starting off with the general dumbing down of schools and learning, the growing fascination with pop culture and fashion, and finally, a section on how girls are focused on being "hot" instead of smart. Bloom quotes statistic after statistic on how much we spend on makeup vs books, how many girls/women are ignorant of all things political, and how we are obsessed with the Kardashians and American Idol. The third chapter deals with our lack of awareness/interest in humanitarian and ecological issues. She talks about genocide in Rwanda, global warming, and all the hot button political issues that Americans are ignorant of. She especially grinds her proverbial axe with the story of Angelina Jolie, who most of us know as Brad Pitt's wife, the one with all the kids, who is Jennifer Aniston's sworn enemy.....but who also is a woman who spends time in Pakistan and other 3rd world countries, trying to make their quality of life better. Bloom's complaint is that we would rather read Vogue to hear about what makeup she uses, or what she cooks Brad for dinner, rather than appreciate her for her forward thinking and caring for the poor. The second part of the book consists of Bloom's solutions to the not-thinking problem. She is a voracious reader, and certainly her thoughts and admonishments about reading rang true with me. She also advocates "farming out" chores to your kids, limiting time on social media websites, and other things like that so as to have more "you" time and not be so frazzled. High on her list is self acceptance, of course, and she quotes more shocking stats on how many girls are thinking about breast implants more than they think about what college they want to get into. Pages 160 to 191 was my favorite section by far, as she gave reasons to read, suggestions on what to read (everything!) and ways to make your kids WANT to read, which is her starting point for helping us start to THINK. If we as Americans can THINK more in our daily lives, we will be smarter and happier, according to her. I tend to agree, but I believe a lot of people will take issue with this. Most of us want to read People instead of the NY Times, and most of us WOULD rather watch American idol instead of some boring political debate or Senate hearing. Bloom just wants us to be well rounded, and not be experts on pop culture only. The one thing that sticks in my head is how we talk to little girls when we meet them: "Oh, what a pretty dress, did your Mom do your hair, what a cute dolly" etc etc. We should THINK, and say to them "Who is your favorite author, what is your best subject in school, what are you reading now" etc. Women should not encourage little girls to obsess over their figure, or to be all pink and frilly. Bloom's message is for every girl to THINK for herself and accept herself for who she is. Well done! This book should be a gift to all girls from their Moms.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura Dugovic

    Dear Lisa Bloom, I was really excited about your book, but about 30 pages into it, I realized that you are kind of {and by "kind of", I mean extremely} feminist/liberal/bleeding heart-ish who is nothing short of positive that we can {and SHOULD!} go all sorts of nuts about the looming threat of global warming. Really, Lisa? Really? Um, have you like, noticed how like, way back in prehistoric olden times, scientists say that there was an ice age...? And have you noticed how, like, scientists have f Dear Lisa Bloom, I was really excited about your book, but about 30 pages into it, I realized that you are kind of {and by "kind of", I mean extremely} feminist/liberal/bleeding heart-ish who is nothing short of positive that we can {and SHOULD!} go all sorts of nuts about the looming threat of global warming. Really, Lisa? Really? Um, have you like, noticed how like, way back in prehistoric olden times, scientists say that there was an ice age...? And have you noticed how, like, scientists have found the fossils of sea creatures in high altitude deserts? Methinks that mayhaps the earth is a violent, turbulent, active, and unpredicatable place to live. I mean, yeah, our carbon footprint is enormous and we need to manufacture less, recycle more and blah blah blah... but I can't help but feel that part of "thinking" includes knowing what to expend your emotional/intellectual energy on...and I'm pretty sure obsessing about global warming is a huge waste of time. Then again, I might not care so much due to the simple fact that I used my "thinker" several years ago when purchasing a home, and opted to purchase a residence in an area that isn't slated to be swallowed whole by the ocean at the first hint of global warming... so I guess there's that. In fact, there's a good chance that my property values will be sky high when the ocean eats Cali and Nevada and makes my 'hood the new "ocean front property." Sweet! Okay, but seriously. I really liked this book. {Once I set my "feminist/liberal/bleeding-heart" filter to a 10.} You actually make a lot of awesome points and the statistics shared at the beginning are mind boggling. "25% of young American women would rather win America's Next Top Model than the Nobel Peace Prize." And "Twenty-three percernt would rather LOSE THEIR ABILITY TO READ than their figures." ...? Someone please tell me this is a joke. I love that your book made the idea of ever picking up another tabloid while waiting in line at the grocery store UTTERLY embarrassing. I LOVE the way you make both women AND the media accountable for feeding into tabloid crap. LOVED the whole section about Angelina Jolie. Drove your point home super well. I love that your book made me want to not only think, but also to act. It was fantastic. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has a fabulous feminist/liberal/bleeding heart filter. Xo, Lola P.s. And seriously, chill on the global warming thing. It's not that we are too stupid to believe that it could happen, or even that it IS CURRENTLY AT THIS VERY MOMENT HAPPENING, it's just that we like, have more important things to worry about. Like world peace...and when the next Justin Bieber album is coming out. {Obviously.} And don't even get me started on Brangelina. My guess is, she's pregnant with triplets AND adopting a baby {or two} from Zimbabwe. How can I focus on global warming at a time like this? Get your priorities straight.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I loved this book and think you all should read it! Lisa Bloom grew up more or less with the mantra of "I never thought about it like that", and so constantly while reading her book, she invokes that same idea on the reader. She discusses many of our current national and international problems, and throughout the book, I realized that I rarely take the time to do research of my own and figure out what's going on in my world. She is an attorney who is also a consultant for many main stream media a I loved this book and think you all should read it! Lisa Bloom grew up more or less with the mantra of "I never thought about it like that", and so constantly while reading her book, she invokes that same idea on the reader. She discusses many of our current national and international problems, and throughout the book, I realized that I rarely take the time to do research of my own and figure out what's going on in my world. She is an attorney who is also a consultant for many main stream media and news sources, and she talks about how she is forced to go on these shows and talk about Brad and Jennifer's divorce, instead of Angelina's incredible contribution to helping 3rd world countries. It's all about money and viewer statistics to the producers, and we are a generation that doesn't question this or fight back. This book enraged me, as well as engaged me, to do something, to take a more active role in understanding what's going on in our world, and to think about what issues make me tick. I need to do more research, to do more learning, to do more thinking. One of the things she said that also spoke to me was her take on traveling. She said she needs to get out of the country at least once a year, just to immerse herself in another culture, understand why they do things the way they do, and gain compassion for something a bit different than we are used to. This is more or less exactly why I travel- because it challenges me, because it opens my eyes and exposes me to things I didn't know or understand previously, and to connect with people who understand that the United States is maybe not all we as Americans think it to be. Because while I am so unbelievably blessed to have been born here, in so many ways, we do have a lot of political and cultural issues that need to be worked out. We got up on our high horse when we had Hillary Clinton running for the presidency because we thought we had come so far (and others were outraged that a female thought she could possibly lead the country). Well, European countries have had female presidents since the 1980's, and Finland has had a *gasp* lesbian president since 2000. And she was re-elected. So... I think we all really do need to stop and THINK and research the world around us (not just the country around us) before making decisions or forming opinions, and go out into the world with an educated viewpoint, and not just accept everything the TV tells us. Everything they do (for the most part) is geared at vamping up numbers and viewers, and very little of it is completely accurate and unbiased. So, think for yourself. Read this book. Get enraged and engaged. Go change the world.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Thank goodness someone is telling it like it is! What is wrong with us as a society, and our educated females? I love Ms. Bloom's take on the world, in fact she may be my long-lost, more articulate twin (and you all thought I was quite verbal and opinionated!) C'mon folks, do you really care what the Kardashians or Housewives did last night? Why is that? Really, she says it best in her book, so I'll let her summarize her thoughts: And how can they be mentally stimulated when their only reading ma Thank goodness someone is telling it like it is! What is wrong with us as a society, and our educated females? I love Ms. Bloom's take on the world, in fact she may be my long-lost, more articulate twin (and you all thought I was quite verbal and opinionated!) C'mon folks, do you really care what the Kardashians or Housewives did last night? Why is that? Really, she says it best in her book, so I'll let her summarize her thoughts: And how can they be mentally stimulated when their only reading materials are magazine pieces like Ten Sex Secrets Men Don't Want You to Know! or Stars Skin Secrets! Because they only read the dumb stuff, and so the media cranks out more dumb stuff, and the consequences are that rape victims are not believed, we cruelly lock up our children for the stiffest prison terms in the world, and we ignore the suffering of God's children who are literally withering away from our inattention. And thats just the beginning. That's why I can't let it go: because our choice not to know, not to think, had dire consequences, and those consequences are upon us now. And that's why we have to reprioritize, now, and stop allowing trivial nonsense to distract us, now, and refocus on what we all know is meaningful now. After laying out the issues, Ms. Bloom offers ideas for us women to start thinking (housework: not my job--I've advocated that for years!) One criticism I read is that this book is all about trying to make us into brainy replicas of Ms. Bloom herself. I don't think that was her intent. She was providing the fodder to get us to start thinking, but certainly everyone may take it in their own direction. Although, in the end, a world fully of brainy Ms. Bloom's would be a much better place.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I, like a few others, decided to read this book after reading Bloom's nugget of wisdom about how to talk to little girls. And Bloom does have more nuggets of wisdom and information scattered throughout the book that are worthwhile. But the heart of the problem with this book is that the message doesn't match the medium. Women who don't read books aren't likely to pick up this one. I don't know about other readers, but the last time I picked up a rag magazine for myself was more then a decade ago I, like a few others, decided to read this book after reading Bloom's nugget of wisdom about how to talk to little girls. And Bloom does have more nuggets of wisdom and information scattered throughout the book that are worthwhile. But the heart of the problem with this book is that the message doesn't match the medium. Women who don't read books aren't likely to pick up this one. I don't know about other readers, but the last time I picked up a rag magazine for myself was more then a decade ago. Does that mean I'm not the right audience for this book? Probably. Do not get me wrong, I think many of the messages offered in this book are sound. But the harping on celebrity gossip and needing to read books says to me that this information could have been more useful as an article series or as blog posts. Then, perhaps, the intended audience would pay it some attention. Bloom also often comes off as what I like to call a "pop culture feminist": there's a lot of wink wink, nudge nudge when it comes with dealing with men or getting them to help around the house. Please. Smart women don't coddle their significant others, they've picked a partner with whom they can balance responsibility. That Bloom continues the tone and encourages the types of ploys often found on the pages of the monthly Cosmo magazine is really off-putting. A more personal pet-peeve: Bloom, as a liberal, was painfully exclusive through most of the book. Heteronormative in almost all of her examples, women who are single, elsewhere on the sexuality spectrum, or not interested in having children were often left out or were footnotes. Overall: The message is good, but it also needs some fine-tuning.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Mikayla

    I was attracted to this book based on Ms. Bloom's highly circulated post on HuffPost "How to talk to Little Girls." The book is toned differently. The start was weak. I didn't know if I wanted to continue, but it was reading so quickly, I stuck with it. The beginning reads "Pundit." Even though she's liberal and preaching to choir with me, it borrowed too many tools from cable tv for my taste - over the top, screed worthy, endless repetition, statistics. Moving into the middle section, I found m I was attracted to this book based on Ms. Bloom's highly circulated post on HuffPost "How to talk to Little Girls." The book is toned differently. The start was weak. I didn't know if I wanted to continue, but it was reading so quickly, I stuck with it. The beginning reads "Pundit." Even though she's liberal and preaching to choir with me, it borrowed too many tools from cable tv for my taste - over the top, screed worthy, endless repetition, statistics. Moving into the middle section, I found my sympathy for her as she described trying to sell a story about the Khmer Rouge war trial and coming up blank in favor of being asked for her legal opinion on celebrity drug trials. The second portion of the book is stronger as she transitions into actionable ideas about how be more engaged in your own life and community. It was convincing enough for me to turn off my Facebook notifications on my iPhone and consider reading more news as a daily practice. It seems a stretch that this is in book format. The topic could have been covered in a web series or a blog (she actually heavily promotes a related blog throughout the text). Some of the most compelling topics that Ms. Bloom covers are on her own interesting childhood growing up as Gloria Allred's daughter and her methods of raising her children. I want to steal the "reading nook" that her and her kids would all cuddle into after dinner. I suppose that's the main issue with this book - it's trying to cover hard news and the personal, the erudite and girl-next-door tone. It never gets the balance quite right.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    This is the first book I have felt compelled to give a review on and for good reason. This book celebrates reading to further one's knowledge and understanding! My favorite thing to do! In the first section Lisa Bloom dissects our culture's obsession with looks and celebrity and the effect it has on women. She cites statistics showing just how uninformed adult women are and (even more unnerving) how unashamed they are about it. She attributes this to our society's rewarding of the "hot and thin" This is the first book I have felt compelled to give a review on and for good reason. This book celebrates reading to further one's knowledge and understanding! My favorite thing to do! In the first section Lisa Bloom dissects our culture's obsession with looks and celebrity and the effect it has on women. She cites statistics showing just how uninformed adult women are and (even more unnerving) how unashamed they are about it. She attributes this to our society's rewarding of the "hot and thin" girl more often than the "smart and ambitious". There are also examples of just how little our country expects of our political leaders as well. How can we worry about protesting an injustice if it interferes with catching episodes of "Teen Mom" and anything starring a Kardashian? The last section focuses on ways to solve this problem and get our priorities in order. This was the section I loved the most as Bloom gives advice on various books and websites to check out. While I tend to feel that this book will primarily be read and enjoyed by women who are already quite well-read I do think it would make a great gift to high school and college graduates who may still be insecure enough to believe they need to waste time worrying about attaining a hot body and perfect hair in order to succeed. This book will inspire them to not take for granted the amazing opportunities available to them as women in today's world and encourage them to read and learn and grow and, of course, think.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I'm torn how to review this. On one hand, I think every woman needs to read this book. In fact, I wish this book was required reading for every 20 year old woman. On the other hand, there's a lot of fluff in this book - like some tips on how to make more time to read (get a maid). And while I'm sure she tried to remain neutral in writing this, some of her political and social agendas do come out. But that shouldn't be a deterrent to reading this. This book has not only motivated me to read more I'm torn how to review this. On one hand, I think every woman needs to read this book. In fact, I wish this book was required reading for every 20 year old woman. On the other hand, there's a lot of fluff in this book - like some tips on how to make more time to read (get a maid). And while I'm sure she tried to remain neutral in writing this, some of her political and social agendas do come out. But that shouldn't be a deterrent to reading this. This book has not only motivated me to read more - but more important than that, it has motivated me to read more things that matter. She has a great section at the end of the book dedicated to recommended reading. I'm going to start with Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. The book also inspired me to look into what I could do for a woman in another country so yesterday, I signed up to sponsor a woman in a war torn country through the Women for Women Foundation.

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