counter create hit The Economics and Politics of Race - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Economics and Politics of Race

Availability: Ready to download

Using an international framework to analyze group differences, Thomas Sowell conducts a significant study of how much of racial groups' economic fate has been determined by society and how much by internal patterns identified in the same group worldwide. 7 cassettes.


Compare
Ads Banner

Using an international framework to analyze group differences, Thomas Sowell conducts a significant study of how much of racial groups' economic fate has been determined by society and how much by internal patterns identified in the same group worldwide. 7 cassettes.

30 review for The Economics and Politics of Race

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jamie King

    This book is quite the study. Following up on the thesis placed in Knowledge and Decision, Sowell traces many ethnic roots like in Ethnic America but across a whole international scene. Through this application we get a study of cause-and-effect that observes the rise of prosperity around the globe. Allowing us to look at the data empirically instead of by mean of intended consequences where rhetoric tends to confuse.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karnok

    Every Sowell book I've had the pleasure of reading is a masterpiece as far as I'm concerned. He reminds me of Mozart or Beethoven. A powerful balance between genius and restraint or perhaps discipline. Christopher Nolan seems to have this quality as well. I sense a lot of passion and enthusiasm from Sowell but it's indirect. Rather than coming through via emotion and persuasion, it's evident in the amount of research carried out and the countless points and counter-points he acknowledges and addr Every Sowell book I've had the pleasure of reading is a masterpiece as far as I'm concerned. He reminds me of Mozart or Beethoven. A powerful balance between genius and restraint or perhaps discipline. Christopher Nolan seems to have this quality as well. I sense a lot of passion and enthusiasm from Sowell but it's indirect. Rather than coming through via emotion and persuasion, it's evident in the amount of research carried out and the countless points and counter-points he acknowledges and addresses. I feel he sincerely covers both sides. This is not a book from a particular point-of-view. It's broad and thorough and focuses on facts, not on the author's personal agenda. It brings up common phrases and rhetoric and breaks them down to see if they are true and/or logical. Falsehoods collapse under the immense weight of the innumerable mundane and benign facts that Sowell points out. It infuriates me that so many people take blanket, strong statements and conclusions for granted without questioning them. I used to find race a boring topic. I never cared about it. I rarely noticed things to do with race or ethnicity. I only found that various people were funny, smart, lazy, rude, stupid, kind and so on in differing amounts. But Sowell follows ethnic/racial groups over space and time and finds patterns. The shocking truth is revealed that groups have tendencies to be better/worse or more/less interested in various activities and skills at given points in time and carry these attributes with them even as they migrate around the world. Why in the first place do people expect groups to perform equally well in all endeavours? The actual patterns are fascinating. Irish Americans in the early 20th century were more likely to be alcoholic and progressed economically very slowly but they dominated politics. Jews and the Japanese were much faster to develop economically but showed little interest in politics (perhaps because they didn't need it). The Chinese in Malaysia and Indonesia *created* a lot of industries and got discriminated against because of their superior passion for hard work and knowledge of running successful businesses. *Despite* racism, they succeeded economically (and helped the countries they moved to) but were punished for it. These are facts and the only agenda Sowell could be accused of having is putting an end to bullshit and showing people the reality of our world (the actual patterns that exist and the actual effects of various policies). It's a colourful and interesting place and humans have a seemingly infinite capacity for good and for evil. Free markets are what bring cultures together even in the face of differences and hatreds. This book is a timeless study of humanity that helps one understand the world much more deeply than convenient, unjustified assumptions ever could. The price of this knowledge is that I'm now even more acutely aware of the level of complete bullshit that pollutes our media and general population today. As I've learned about economics (and free markets in particular), I've found how similar it is to Darwin's theory of evolution. They are both deeply misunderstood and attacked illogically as a result. They both predict the rising of efficient systems in the face of many random changes and very non-random success/failure (life/death) processes. They are also incredibly *tame* in their basic concepts. The Economics and Politics of Race is unbelievably tame in its conclusions and yet very insightful and powerful. Just as Richard Dawkins ends up spending two thirds of his time explaining why common misconceptions are wrong or misleading, so must Thomas Sowell. If only people would stop jumping, or should I say, teleporting to distant unfounded conclusions, brilliant authors like Sowell could spend more time divulging the incredible beauty and reality of our world and less time on weeding out the rubbish that already clutters so many people's visions of our world.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jack

    Data-driven and thought-provoking. Just as relevant in 2020 as when it was first published in 1983. Table of Contents: Author's Preface Part I: History Ch 1: The Role of Race Ch 2: The Overseas Chinese Ch 3: Immigrants from Europe Ch 4: Blacks and Coloreds Part II: Analysis Ch 5: An International Perspective Ch 6: The American Experience Ch 7: The Third World Ch 8: The Past and the Future Why have the Chinese excelled economically in every country they've been present in? What were some of the explicitly dis Data-driven and thought-provoking. Just as relevant in 2020 as when it was first published in 1983. Table of Contents: Author's Preface Part I: History Ch 1: The Role of Race Ch 2: The Overseas Chinese Ch 3: Immigrants from Europe Ch 4: Blacks and Coloreds Part II: Analysis Ch 5: An International Perspective Ch 6: The American Experience Ch 7: The Third World Ch 8: The Past and the Future Why have the Chinese excelled economically in every country they've been present in? What were some of the explicitly discriminatory policies they encountered around the world, and what were the economic consequences both for them and the non-Chinese in these countries as a result of these policies? Why does Japan have a higher standard of living than Mexico despite having a far higher population density and far fewer natural resources? How did the cultures and values of Irish, German, and Italian immigrants to the US differ and what were the consequences, both political and economic? How did Germans in Argentina differ from those in Europe? How were they the same? How have "blacks" been treated vs "coloreds" in South Africa? In the Caribbean? In the US? How have they viewed and treated each other? What is even meant by such terms around the world? These are but a few questions Sowell answers in his classic book. First published in 1983, initially I thought it might not be especially relevant today in 2020, but in some ways, I found it more insightful BECAUSE of when it was written. The material can be a little dry at times, but it is exceptionally informational and will definitely make you think. Every book from Thomas Sowell offers something new, and his work is empirically based and data-driven, even on controversial issues like race and economics. I feel comfortable in saying reading or listening to this single book alone will make you understand the subject matter better than >95% of the population. It should be required reading. If you want a real education, The Economics and Politics of Race (and every book by Thomas Sowell) is a tremendous bang for your buck.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    Another good book by Thomas Sowell. It is interesting at this time to read about the Soviet Union and apartheid being referred to in the present tense. While much has happened internationally since this book first came out, his underlying observations remain valid. He writes this with an international perspective to show how certain groups of people, throughout history, have migrated and succeeded more than the local populations. He notes how some groups move and become very involved in politics Another good book by Thomas Sowell. It is interesting at this time to read about the Soviet Union and apartheid being referred to in the present tense. While much has happened internationally since this book first came out, his underlying observations remain valid. He writes this with an international perspective to show how certain groups of people, throughout history, have migrated and succeeded more than the local populations. He notes how some groups move and become very involved in politics, while others stay almost completely out of politics. He notes how some groups, most notably the overseas Chinese, exceed the prosperity levels of the local populations. He notes how some groups tend to cluster and recreate the culture of their home country, remaining very separate from the culture into which they move. At the same time other groups will move in and acculturate and merge to create a new culture (much of Latin America fits this description). A worthwhile read if you are interested in these subjects. The international examples he gives really helps him make his case as it cannot be seen as specific to just one culture or race, but is indeed global in scope.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    Thomas Sowell first gives you an overall look at how people groups have migrated around the world and how they have faired economically. He then shows how political talk and policies that are generated sound good, but actually have the opposite economic result than intended. It's a great book if you want to understand why different cultures do better economically than others when faced with the same adversarial conditions (For example, the Japanse in America were placed in camps and discriminate Thomas Sowell first gives you an overall look at how people groups have migrated around the world and how they have faired economically. He then shows how political talk and policies that are generated sound good, but actually have the opposite economic result than intended. It's a great book if you want to understand why different cultures do better economically than others when faced with the same adversarial conditions (For example, the Japanse in America were placed in camps and discriminated against in WWII. Now they do better ecomically than the average "white" person in America. Discrimination did not hold them back.)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Adam Morva

    The book has lots of interesting concepts, conclusions and data, however... Some of it is a bit outdated. It was written almost 40 years ago, after all. Some conclusions are not supported by evidence. A few, maybe just one or two of them are outright retarded. For example, Sowell argues that our natural resources won't run out, but at the very least not in a foreseeable future, and we shouldn't worry about it. His reasoning? Hundreds of years ago we didn't know about many resources we use today. The a The book has lots of interesting concepts, conclusions and data, however... Some of it is a bit outdated. It was written almost 40 years ago, after all. Some conclusions are not supported by evidence. A few, maybe just one or two of them are outright retarded. For example, Sowell argues that our natural resources won't run out, but at the very least not in a foreseeable future, and we shouldn't worry about it. His reasoning? Hundreds of years ago we didn't know about many resources we use today. The amount of these resources may be higher than we know. The good parts far outweigh the questionable / bad ones, so I'll give it 3/5.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sylvester Kuo

    Comprehensive guide to how different people of different cultural backgrounds become successful as immigrants and how politics have been an influence in their disastrous attempt to either repel immigrants or affirmative actions. Sowell offered a flawless writing on the various historical facts which contributed the prosperous economies and why certain economies failed. I was actually quite intrigued to learn that segregation sometimes can reduce the effort caused in interactions. Overall a very Comprehensive guide to how different people of different cultural backgrounds become successful as immigrants and how politics have been an influence in their disastrous attempt to either repel immigrants or affirmative actions. Sowell offered a flawless writing on the various historical facts which contributed the prosperous economies and why certain economies failed. I was actually quite intrigued to learn that segregation sometimes can reduce the effort caused in interactions. Overall a very good book to combat any leftist talk points.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Void lon iXaarii

    Though i was familiar with a number of the conclusions of the research it was fascinating to get so many historical facts showing the values of different cultures and how they perform quite specifically determined not by location but by ways of thinking. Great data!

  9. 5 out of 5

    David

    The Economics and Politics of Race is another excellent book by author Thomas Sowell. As is his usual practice he has done extensive research and performed in depth studies on this topic. He looks at issues like why certain ethnic groups seem to dominate in some areas of businesses wherever they are in the world. He explores the idea that race may contribute to the appearance of being locked out of some fields. He looks at various racial and ethnic groups with respect to typical profession or li The Economics and Politics of Race is another excellent book by author Thomas Sowell. As is his usual practice he has done extensive research and performed in depth studies on this topic. He looks at issues like why certain ethnic groups seem to dominate in some areas of businesses wherever they are in the world. He explores the idea that race may contribute to the appearance of being locked out of some fields. He looks at various racial and ethnic groups with respect to typical profession or line of work is most common within a particular group and discusses why that might be the case. He points out similarities for that group in various locations around the world and discusses why some seem to excel even more than the native people of that country. After having read several of his books I do notice some material is reused if appropriate from one book to another. But I find his presentation of the material and writing style such that I don't mind and it's like a refresher of sorts. Now to find the next one...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael Delaware

    This book is incredible in its thoroughness, and timeless truths about how race is used in politics, and economics. The author goes back through the centuries exposing the facts about international racial interaction that is still true today. When I read some of the last chapters, I thought he was talking about the events of today. Only when I neared the end of the book did I realize this was written and released in 1985. Thomas Sowell is a sage imparting wisdom. This book should be required rea This book is incredible in its thoroughness, and timeless truths about how race is used in politics, and economics. The author goes back through the centuries exposing the facts about international racial interaction that is still true today. When I read some of the last chapters, I thought he was talking about the events of today. Only when I neared the end of the book did I realize this was written and released in 1985. Thomas Sowell is a sage imparting wisdom. This book should be required reading with all college courses on international political relations.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sean Solberg

    Sowell reviews a selected history of historic racial groups, considering how they fared in different regions of the globe economically and politically. Sowell highlights how groups appear to have cultural/human capital differences that lead to differing outcomes in their homelands as well as when they are in non-native regions of the globe. These differences can lead groups to prosper even when social/cultural forces are arrayed against them. I found this to be an easy read and the author's poin Sowell reviews a selected history of historic racial groups, considering how they fared in different regions of the globe economically and politically. Sowell highlights how groups appear to have cultural/human capital differences that lead to differing outcomes in their homelands as well as when they are in non-native regions of the globe. These differences can lead groups to prosper even when social/cultural forces are arrayed against them. I found this to be an easy read and the author's point to be well illustrated. Recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Murphy

    An impressive attempt at explaining racial disparities in the United States and around the world, and does a great deal to demystify and secularize those differences. He challenges simple notions, and takes great care to show winners and losers among the different racial groupings and then works to explain the differences culturally. That said, this book is old and I have considerable questions regarding its continued accuracy, especially as the situation appears to be getting worse since this p An impressive attempt at explaining racial disparities in the United States and around the world, and does a great deal to demystify and secularize those differences. He challenges simple notions, and takes great care to show winners and losers among the different racial groupings and then works to explain the differences culturally. That said, this book is old and I have considerable questions regarding its continued accuracy, especially as the situation appears to be getting worse since this publication. B (85)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Micah

    Very informative and useful for modern times. More people rioting need to reed this book!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    Fascinating discussion of demographics as it applies to immigration to the U.S. It talks a lot about what different immigrant groups generally valued, sought for, stayed or didn't stay in the U.S.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Donald Lanham

    An examination of the effects of various races and ethnic groups on the politics and economies of various countries by looking at the changes created by immigration. Pretty interesting.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hom Sack

    Makes sense.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Guy P. Ontai

    An older book that needs to be updated! An excellent analysis that tackles often emotional and politicized subjects. Enjoyed it thoroughly..

  18. 4 out of 5

    Victor Negut

    Having been published in the early 1980’s, some of the content of this book has lost relevance, but overall it is a rare gem. If this book has a contemporary equivalent I would love to find it. Note: this is a scholarly and dry text, if you are looking for exciting anecdotes and charged language you will not find it here.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mark Geise

    I don't think I've ever rated a Thomas Sowell book less than five stars; this continues that pattern. One of Sowell's first books, "The Economics and Politics of Race", written in 1983, explores some popular conceptions about race and if and how historical facts and data back up these conceptions. Unsurprisingly, the data does not agree with much of the rhetoric thrown around by much of the mainstream, specifically on the progressive left. Sowell begins this book with discussions about specific e I don't think I've ever rated a Thomas Sowell book less than five stars; this continues that pattern. One of Sowell's first books, "The Economics and Politics of Race", written in 1983, explores some popular conceptions about race and if and how historical facts and data back up these conceptions. Unsurprisingly, the data does not agree with much of the rhetoric thrown around by much of the mainstream, specifically on the progressive left. Sowell begins this book with discussions about specific ethnic groups and their different histories. The Chinese and Jews, for example, have been thrust from numerous societies throughout history because they have generally risen to levels of prosperity above native populations. They have filled middleman roles everywhere they have gone and have generally improved the standards of living in those societies. Political rhetoric has not coalesced with economic realities, however. These minorities have been vilified for taking from the economy and from the dominant majority, leading to restrictive laws, violence, and expulsion. He also details the history of the Irish, Italians, Germans and Western Hemisphere blacks, among other groups. Next, Sowell discusses the implications of the histories of these peoples. Though it is commonly stated as fact, Sowell does not agree that discrimination or exploitation can be the primary explanatory variable in differences in output among different groups of people and different nations. Instead, attitudes and cultural differences are most important. The Jews and Chinese have been expelled from many societies, leaving with little more than the clothes on their backs. Time and time again, they have built themselves back up to relative affluence in new societies. On the other hand, other groups have continually lagged behind others. It is difficult to ascertain the reasons behind these differences in cultural attitudes, but there is little doubt that they exist. There are many dangers associated with trying to legislate away these differences. First, a country may drive away those groups with cultural attitudes that are more likely to lead to affluence and a general increase in standards of living for the society as a whole. Second, political "solutions" may reinforce attitudes that are less likely to lead to affluence by subsidizing those attitudes and the groups that hold them in greater numbers. Third, these types of legislation are likely to reinforce inter-group hostility and distrust. Because these types of legislation necessarily take from one group to give to another, increased distrust and hostility is inevitable. The market has done a far better job than any government at lifting the standards of living of less affluent groups. The market places a price on discrimination that governments are not limited by. One of my favorite Sowell examples is that of a racist owner of a basketball team. Even if he is the most racist man on earth, he must hire black players to remain competitive in the marketplace. He also details this progression in South Africa, one of the most racist governments in recent history. Business owners in South Africa continually tried to get around the laws intended to limit employment of blacks, though there is absolutely no evidence that South African business owners are any less racist than the general public. The competitive market placed a higher price on discrimination than the business owners could tolerate, so the government had to impose by fiat and violence the exclusion of blacks from employment. This happened in the antebellum American South with restrictive laws and attitudes toward blacks and the American West with similar laws aimed toward Chinese and Japanese immigrants. This is another fascinating offering from Sowell. It contains a lot of similar information to what he presented in "Ethnic America", but he both presents more information from other countries and societies and draws more inferences about the political and economic implications of race. Though this was written over 30 years ago, he warns about the dangers of the politicization of race, the effects of which we are experiencing first-hand in the United States. He warns of the potential effects of both intra- and inter-societal redistributional policies, which is some of his most poignant analysis in this book. Sowell's ability to weave data and analysis together in a captivating narrative is unparalleled, in my opinion. I highly recommend "The Economics and Politics of Race".

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    This turned out to be cross-reading for me. It was more dry/scholarly than I expected, lots of numbers. I know economics has a tendency to aim for the dispassionate, but then I picked up on a lot of bias; I don't think you could say it was brutal honesty. The author's perspective emphasized a lot of "pull yourself up by your bootstraps" / "teach a man to fish" rhetoric, and criticized a lot of social programs and developmental aid without the intention of suggesting a better alternative. Also ap This turned out to be cross-reading for me. It was more dry/scholarly than I expected, lots of numbers. I know economics has a tendency to aim for the dispassionate, but then I picked up on a lot of bias; I don't think you could say it was brutal honesty. The author's perspective emphasized a lot of "pull yourself up by your bootstraps" / "teach a man to fish" rhetoric, and criticized a lot of social programs and developmental aid without the intention of suggesting a better alternative. Also apparently we're not running out of natural resources because people 200 years ago didn't even know about / value petroleum oil/gas and we'll probably just find something else that there's a ton of that we haven't even used yet. Someone once colonized an island that had huge tin deposits the natives weren't using! People who complain about exploitation don't realize that most colonizers didn't make a lot of money! and other apologist gems, hidden between some very good points about human capital and the value of an education. Not much about Black/White race relations, mostly assimilation of Japanese vs. Germans vs. Jews vs. Italians vs. Irish vs. Chinese. Oh also the audio reader is hard to hear clearly and pronounced a bunch of words wrong. The stats referenced also seemed fairly stale. How old is this book? Oh, released 08/30/1985.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Scott Cox

    A friend introduced me to this well-researched book by Hoover Institute Senior Fellow Thomas Sowell many years ago. In this excellent work, Sowell documents how racial bias and bigotry is common to many cultures and societies. For example, Chinese are discriminated against in many parts of Asia in a similar way that Jews have been persecuted in Europe. The following is one of the more interesting Sowell quotes, "Blacks were not enslaved because they were black but because they were available. Sl A friend introduced me to this well-researched book by Hoover Institute Senior Fellow Thomas Sowell many years ago. In this excellent work, Sowell documents how racial bias and bigotry is common to many cultures and societies. For example, Chinese are discriminated against in many parts of Asia in a similar way that Jews have been persecuted in Europe. The following is one of the more interesting Sowell quotes, "Blacks were not enslaved because they were black but because they were available. Slavery has existed in the world for thousands of years. Whites enslaved other whites in Europe for centuries before the first black was brought to the Western hemisphere. Asians enslaved Europeans. Asians enslaved other Asians. Africans enslaved other Africans, and indeed even today in North Africa, blacks continue to enslave blacks." Sowell's writings are said to have influenced Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    This book contains a lot of good information and historical facts. It is also interesting to consider Tomas Sowell's conclusions on his research. The book did get wordy towards the end and I would have appreciated the last 40 pages being about possible solutions or ways to combat discrimination. Overall, this was a quick read, well cited, and contained much needed information. I recommend it to anyone interested in race/ethnicity, civil rights, history, politics, sociology, etc. I also think thi This book contains a lot of good information and historical facts. It is also interesting to consider Tomas Sowell's conclusions on his research. The book did get wordy towards the end and I would have appreciated the last 40 pages being about possible solutions or ways to combat discrimination. Overall, this was a quick read, well cited, and contained much needed information. I recommend it to anyone interested in race/ethnicity, civil rights, history, politics, sociology, etc. I also think this book is a good conversation piece and can lead to many enlightening conversations between friends, classmates, etc. Therefore, it would be a good book for a book club or college course.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Achord

    Dated, yet outstanding.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ms Piot

    This is the one. Remember it well. Provocative, but ultimately flawed. the author's inferiority complex was showing

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jcdavison

    amazing though leadership on some sticky, tough topics.

  26. 5 out of 5

    JB King

  27. 4 out of 5

    Philippe

  28. 5 out of 5

    John

  29. 5 out of 5

    John

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Mehl

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.