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The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Cookbook: Heirloom fruits and vegetables, and more than 100 heritage recipes to inspire every generation

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Welcome to Beekman 1802, in Sharon Springs, NY--the historic home of The Fabulous Beekman Boys, Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Brent Ridge. Josh and Brent star in the popular show on Planet Green TV, and they have built a worldwide reputation for their goat's milk soaps and superb, artisanal Blaak cheese. Together, Josh and Brent have created a gorgeous cookbook that is “heirloom” Welcome to Beekman 1802, in Sharon Springs, NY--the historic home of The Fabulous Beekman Boys, Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Brent Ridge. Josh and Brent star in the popular show on Planet Green TV, and they have built a worldwide reputation for their goat's milk soaps and superb, artisanal Blaak cheese. Together, Josh and Brent have created a gorgeous cookbook that is “heirloom” in every sense of the word: they showcase heirloom fruits and vegetables; offer delicious heirloom recipes from farm, family, and friends; and include a section in the back of each chapter so you can personalize the book with your own treasured recipes--and create a unique keepsake to hand down to your family. From springtime pea pod risotto and summery strawberry shortcake to quick braised collards in autumn and yummy chicken 'n' dumplings for a snowy winter's day, this is simple yet luscious farm-fresh fare that everyone will love.


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Welcome to Beekman 1802, in Sharon Springs, NY--the historic home of The Fabulous Beekman Boys, Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Brent Ridge. Josh and Brent star in the popular show on Planet Green TV, and they have built a worldwide reputation for their goat's milk soaps and superb, artisanal Blaak cheese. Together, Josh and Brent have created a gorgeous cookbook that is “heirloom” Welcome to Beekman 1802, in Sharon Springs, NY--the historic home of The Fabulous Beekman Boys, Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Brent Ridge. Josh and Brent star in the popular show on Planet Green TV, and they have built a worldwide reputation for their goat's milk soaps and superb, artisanal Blaak cheese. Together, Josh and Brent have created a gorgeous cookbook that is “heirloom” in every sense of the word: they showcase heirloom fruits and vegetables; offer delicious heirloom recipes from farm, family, and friends; and include a section in the back of each chapter so you can personalize the book with your own treasured recipes--and create a unique keepsake to hand down to your family. From springtime pea pod risotto and summery strawberry shortcake to quick braised collards in autumn and yummy chicken 'n' dumplings for a snowy winter's day, this is simple yet luscious farm-fresh fare that everyone will love.

30 review for The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Cookbook: Heirloom fruits and vegetables, and more than 100 heritage recipes to inspire every generation

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I'm always glad when my library has cookbooks especially that I want to browse but not buy. This one was interesting the read about the Fabulous Beekman Boys and learn how they taking heirloom recipes and using the freshest of ingredients. Most of the recipes my husband would never eat. Many of the dishes I know I would love to try. The book is setup by season and has places to write notes. A truly well laid out cookbook.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Okay cookbook with a few noteworthy recipes (in my mind, corn chowder salad and roasted cauliflower-apple soup sound fabulous). I did like how they leave room for you to take notes next to the recipes, though.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Megan Peters

    This was a beautiful cookbook to read! There are a couple of recipes that sound delicious: the pumpkin cheese bread, the lasagna pumpkin roll-ups... most of the fall recipes I'm dying to try mostly because they contain squash.

  4. 5 out of 5

    EdibleNotesReviews

    The Beekman Boys, Brent Ridge and Josh Kilmer-Purcell, from their idyllic farm in upstate New York have created quite a stir with their 'omnimedia' approach to all things sheepy-and-green. Not the least of which has been their splash with The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Cookbook (Sterling Epicure, Oct. 2011) with fellow MSLO alum Sandy Gluck. They've put together a cookbook that at once is a paean to the old-timey 'heritage' recipes (what most of us would call the good simple foods that graced countles The Beekman Boys, Brent Ridge and Josh Kilmer-Purcell, from their idyllic farm in upstate New York have created quite a stir with their 'omnimedia' approach to all things sheepy-and-green. Not the least of which has been their splash with The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Cookbook (Sterling Epicure, Oct. 2011) with fellow MSLO alum Sandy Gluck. They've put together a cookbook that at once is a paean to the old-timey 'heritage' recipes (what most of us would call the good simple foods that graced countless cookbooks especially through the 60's and early 70's), a textbook on food photography from a by-gone era and a scrapbook for collecting family recipes and food lore. If it is missing anything it might be that there is no pop-up of one of their beloved barnyard residents. The book is full of the kinds of recipes we all remember but often can't find in a book to pass along to a new friend or family member now out on their own. Arranged seasonally rather than by ingredient or menu part, the book does inspire to cook and drink within what's at hand or easily available. There is much to be said for recipes with ten ingredients or less in some cases and that fit on a standard book sized page. With this inspiration, and maybe a note written here or there in the margins of the pages (conveniently lined), a cook can gather and mix and generally whip-up everything from a simple spring dinner to a grand fall feast. The ingredients called for are simple to find with the exception of the Beekman1802 Blaak Cheese (it's as spendy as heck and supplies are limited) but substitutions are easily found. As cookbooks go there is no opposition to the old-school nature of simple farm-fresh foods, whether you own the farm or not. And it is actually rewarding to see food photography that is thought out like a still painting even if it is occassionally over-propped for everyone's taste. The photography here supports the look and feel of the book, the homey, heritage'ness' of it all very well. But it is the 'heirloom' idea that is most important to the book for both the reader and writers. We all have cookbooks that have been passed from generation to generation, bearing witness to family gatherings, fabulous failure meals and often ticked with changes and stuffed with clippings. The Boys tap into that idea of working with a cookbook for a while, scribbling notes as needed, using the Beekman designed recipes cards included with the book to convey a treasured family recipe and then passing the book on. And nothing could be more important about the book than that. A grandmother's cookbook, with measurements in eggshell-full increments and incompleteness, is a beautiful thing to hold and cook from. Books like these breathe a life of their own gained from splattered red gravy, smudged stews and cocoa powder. A life that has been passed to us to care for and add to and to never quite complete ourselves before passing them along. So, for all the hoopla surrounding them, the Boys have done a remarkable thing; they have created a cookbook that can stand up to modern day local-foodies and that can become a worn-binding, nicked up, smeared in places treasured archive of the foods not only on its pages but tucked deep inside its soul. Edible Notes received a complimentary copy of the book from the publisher and received no other compensation for this review. Edible Notes Copyright 2011

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Read in April 2012. I'd like to first clarify the title. The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Cookbook is so named because 'The Beekman' home and farm was established in 1802 and the 'Heirloom' part of the title represents many of the 'heirloom' recipes that the authors have collected and sometimes re-created are based on recipes that have been passed on to them from family and friends over the years and generations. I think it's important to be upfront that the recipes themselves are not necessarily indica Read in April 2012. I'd like to first clarify the title. The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Cookbook is so named because 'The Beekman' home and farm was established in 1802 and the 'Heirloom' part of the title represents many of the 'heirloom' recipes that the authors have collected and sometimes re-created are based on recipes that have been passed on to them from family and friends over the years and generations. I think it's important to be upfront that the recipes themselves are not necessarily indicative of the turn of the 19th century, although one can rightfully imagine many of the seasonal ingredients called for in the cookbook are grown at The Beekman and other local, organic farms and backyard gardens throughout the country by the same, traditional growing methods that were used in 1802. I'd like to think so, anyway. The Beekman 1802 is organized in my very favorite way--by season. It's the way I cook at home, based on the seasonal organic produce that comes in my co-op, which provides local produce as much as possible. The recipes showcase the best of seasonal produce in rural upstate New York, which is a little location specific but I think the items are still fruits and vegetables that can be found fresh in many farmer's markets during their peak season throughout the continental US. If not, you may be inspired to grow some yourself! Most of the recipes are rather common, classic American fare--recipes that I have made on my own without recipes or from recipes that are very similar in other cookbooks or even current cooking magazines. Not that there's anything objectionable about that! However, if you are a fairly experienced home cook, chances are you already have a reliable version of these recipes in your repertoire. If you are a relative new comer to the world of home cooking, have recently joined a CSA or co-op, or you have your own vegetable garden, these recipes may appeal to you more and would actually make this cookbook an excellent starting point for your kitchen and cookbook collection. If unique and inspirational recipes are more appealing to you, don't be discouraged. Dispersed among the many basic recipes are a few unique gems that stand out. Some of the recipes that I'd like to try: Mint Lemon Cooler Homemade Lemonade with Lavender and Vanilla Corn Chowder Salad Quick Bread-and-Butter Pickles Butternut Squash-Filled Lasagna Rolls Harvest Beef Chili with Pumpkin and Beans Roast Pork Loin with Gingerbread Stuffing Orange Gingerbread Overall I think this cookbook is a very nice basic seasonal cookbook that emphasizes fresh, seasonal produce, cheeses and meats that many readers and home cooks would enjoy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Crnbryeggshls

    I thought this was a fun read. I can't give it a five star review only because I received my copy through GoodReads Giveaways, and it was the Advance Reading edition. In the Advance reading copy all the photos and graphic elements are in black and white, so without full knowledge of what these will look like in the final edition, I have to leave off one star. Other than the images the book was very appealing. The recipes are divided by season. I've had cookbooks that were set up like this before I thought this was a fun read. I can't give it a five star review only because I received my copy through GoodReads Giveaways, and it was the Advance Reading edition. In the Advance reading copy all the photos and graphic elements are in black and white, so without full knowledge of what these will look like in the final edition, I have to leave off one star. Other than the images the book was very appealing. The recipes are divided by season. I've had cookbooks that were set up like this before, and the organization seemed a bit forced. In this case though, the brother's descriptions of each vegetable coming into season really brought the structure to life. Another nice touch was the little space on the side of each page for notes and alterations to the recipes. As a person who tends to tweak recipes rather than following them exactly I found this very helpful. The recipes themselves call for fresh seasonal ingredients. Many of them would work well for large groups, and seem easy to throw together. Even those that are fairly complex aren't particularly difficult to make. Overall it was a good book, combining appealing descriptions, a useful layout, clear instructions for beginning cooks, and inspiration for those with more experience.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    A great cookbook for people who like seasonal cooking/baking. I'll have to buy a copy for my collection.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    When they say "heritage recipes," they mean it. This book is full of really old-fashioned, seasonal foods. It reads like the greatest hits of American farm meals: Potato-Leek Gratin, Broccoli-Cheddar Soup, Roasted Lamb with Mint, Potato Salad. This book is full of classic recipes. It's nostalgic, rather than forward-thinking. For people looking for those kinds of recipes, this book will be great. Since I'm not really into that kind of food, it wasn't for me. I only really picked it up from the lib When they say "heritage recipes," they mean it. This book is full of really old-fashioned, seasonal foods. It reads like the greatest hits of American farm meals: Potato-Leek Gratin, Broccoli-Cheddar Soup, Roasted Lamb with Mint, Potato Salad. This book is full of classic recipes. It's nostalgic, rather than forward-thinking. For people looking for those kinds of recipes, this book will be great. Since I'm not really into that kind of food, it wasn't for me. I only really picked it up from the library because I like the show and saw it on the shelf as I was walking to the check-out counter. I should have slowed down at the library and glanced through it before carrying the heavy thing all the way home. I would have immediately recognized that this book is probably great for some people--but not so much for me. Oh well.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Judith

    The sign of a good cookbook is one that brings you into the kitchen while you are reading it. Tonight I made a roast chicken with rosemary potatoes and sweet potatoes. I grew the red potatoes on my balcony and the apple, onion & other potatoes came from our CSA and local farmers market. I'm asking Santa for an 11" cast iron skillet. I see roasting more vegetables in my future. While I was disappointed of the inclusion of panko bread crumbs (this Southern girl prefers cornmeal), lard (OMG!) and so The sign of a good cookbook is one that brings you into the kitchen while you are reading it. Tonight I made a roast chicken with rosemary potatoes and sweet potatoes. I grew the red potatoes on my balcony and the apple, onion & other potatoes came from our CSA and local farmers market. I'm asking Santa for an 11" cast iron skillet. I see roasting more vegetables in my future. While I was disappointed of the inclusion of panko bread crumbs (this Southern girl prefers cornmeal), lard (OMG!) and so much dairy (I barely use it, but well, they do keep goats), I like the idea of a cookbook that you can write in. The little pocket folders, pictures and stories make this one a gem.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This was a Goodread First Reads Win and it reminded me of recipes my mother and grandmother would fix on Sunday or for Family Reunions. I loved the vegetable pictures in the book that remind me on my own little garden in the summer. The first recipe in the book for Deviled Eggs of course is the one thing I must bring to all family gathering. The Baked Ham, Stawberry Rhubarb Crumble, Corn Fritters and Apple Butter Turnovers and all items I remember as a child growing up, so this book truly is a He This was a Goodread First Reads Win and it reminded me of recipes my mother and grandmother would fix on Sunday or for Family Reunions. I loved the vegetable pictures in the book that remind me on my own little garden in the summer. The first recipe in the book for Deviled Eggs of course is the one thing I must bring to all family gathering. The Baked Ham, Stawberry Rhubarb Crumble, Corn Fritters and Apple Butter Turnovers and all items I remember as a child growing up, so this book truly is a Heirloom Cookbook. Please make the purchase and enjoy these wonderful old recipes that are good for a lifetime.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I recently won an ARC of this book through first reads, and though unable to try out the recipes myself yet, most seem to be (delicious!) adaptations of many traditional and simple dishes. The book itself is very well organized, with recipes categorized by season and ample room in the margins for notes. The side notes, stories, and additional information included with the recipes were a nice touch, adding a more personal feel to the cookbook overall and preventing it from becoming merely a well- I recently won an ARC of this book through first reads, and though unable to try out the recipes myself yet, most seem to be (delicious!) adaptations of many traditional and simple dishes. The book itself is very well organized, with recipes categorized by season and ample room in the margins for notes. The side notes, stories, and additional information included with the recipes were a nice touch, adding a more personal feel to the cookbook overall and preventing it from becoming merely a well-organized compilation of recipes.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Recipe books always look sooo good. And usually I just flip through and ooh and aah at the pretty pictures. Then I look at the ingredient list and it usually includes 4 things I would only use in that particular recipe, with the rest going to waste, possibly. I hate that. BUT: this book has just a right mix of new things that I would be willing to try out without buying crap I'll never use otherwise. And I love that many of the recipes are like 10 ingredients or less, including seasonings. Simpl Recipe books always look sooo good. And usually I just flip through and ooh and aah at the pretty pictures. Then I look at the ingredient list and it usually includes 4 things I would only use in that particular recipe, with the rest going to waste, possibly. I hate that. BUT: this book has just a right mix of new things that I would be willing to try out without buying crap I'll never use otherwise. And I love that many of the recipes are like 10 ingredients or less, including seasonings. Simple, elegant and appetizing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    I love that this book is divided by season. I also love that it only has 100 recipes in it. I never feel overwhelmed when flipping through it, and I always come away thinking of the many recipes I am looking forward to making. These heirloom recipes are not only simple, but they use real, healthy ingredients; you won't find corn syrup or other modern industrial ingredients. The color pictures are beautiful, and they've even included some recipe cards for you to write your own family's heirloom r I love that this book is divided by season. I also love that it only has 100 recipes in it. I never feel overwhelmed when flipping through it, and I always come away thinking of the many recipes I am looking forward to making. These heirloom recipes are not only simple, but they use real, healthy ingredients; you won't find corn syrup or other modern industrial ingredients. The color pictures are beautiful, and they've even included some recipe cards for you to write your own family's heirloom recipes.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I really wanted to love this book. Heirloom ingredients, classic recipes--this had so much promise! Alas, there were not enough pictures and too many heavy recipes for me. I'm also not a huge fan of the seasonal organization, though I understand the purpose of it. I really prefer having all the salads together rather than having to flip through each season to find what veggies are on offer. Still, some really delicious-sounding recipes and I continue to support the locavore-loving cookbooks!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dana West

    The recipes are easy, the ingredients accessible, and the "notes" area next to each recipe is a wonderful addition to a cookbook, my notes can now be organized rather than scribbled into the margin. I love that the authors encourage at home cooks to log on to their website and post the variations they have created from these recipes. The idea that heirloom recipes have been adapted over time allow a home cook to branch out and, with confidence, tweak an ingredient or two, without the fear of "ru The recipes are easy, the ingredients accessible, and the "notes" area next to each recipe is a wonderful addition to a cookbook, my notes can now be organized rather than scribbled into the margin. I love that the authors encourage at home cooks to log on to their website and post the variations they have created from these recipes. The idea that heirloom recipes have been adapted over time allow a home cook to branch out and, with confidence, tweak an ingredient or two, without the fear of "ruining" a dish.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kenzi

    I won this as a first read! I was expecting something different from this cookbook. Maybe more old fashioned or recipes that really showcased heirloom varieties of fruits and veg. This kind of had that feel, but they all seemed more like fancy restaurant recipes than things you'd make in your own kitchen. It had some interesting recipes, especially if you eat meat-but I didn't really see where the heirloom came into it-it was just a fancy cookbook.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    I won this book on Goodreads FirstReads. It is a cookbook and I haven't tried any of the recipes yet but I am going too. This is an interesting cookbook as it has little stories about the authors families traditions that I always enjoy reading. It also has a place on each page that you can write your own notes. Nice pictures also. There are hints throughout about different fruits and vegetables that you can grow in your own garden. Nice and I would recommended this to anyone.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mellodi

    Loved this book. Great recipes that are easy to follow. I also love that there is a space within the pages to make your own recipe additions and really make each recipe with your own added flare to really make each recipe your own. If you're just looking for new recipes to try to add to your meal plans this book is worth checking out.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marya Kowal

    Beautiful book for a gift. Not only does it have some interesting recipes, not all of which have totally outlandish ingredients, but it also has places where you can add your own notes, cards you can add your family recipes, and it's just plain gorgeous. Not a must-have, but the perfect christmas, mother's day, or birthday gift for the foodie that has everything.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rodney Ross

    Love these menz, love this book, several very easy recipes, which isn't always the case with upscale cookbooks. Uhm, no, I don't happen to have black sesame seeds in my pantry and no, I apologize, I don't always have a $48 bottle of Balsamic Vinegar at-hand. Heartily recommended for those wanting to cook comfort food with style.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Not a lot in here that I would actually cook, although I would probably cook more of it if I lived in the country or on a homestead. And if I cooked with Alcohol. This is not a book to add to my cookbook collection, although for someone more adventurous (and with more time) this may be a great book to cook through.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    This cookbook is a real heirloom. The photos are breathtaking and the recipes are delicious and very doable for an average cook like myself. There are spaces in the margins for you to make notes and add your own twists to the recipes. Love the Beekmans!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    The photographs in the book are wonderful. Make the food look fantastic. I have looked the Beekman Boys since they were first on TV. I don't know that I will try many of the receipes as even some of the ingredients would be hard to find.

  24. 5 out of 5

    emyrose8

    I like the idea of this cookbook: a place for cooks to write notes and adaptations and also a place to include their own family recipes. However, I didn't find many recipes I wanted to try.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Yes, the Beekman boys are fabulous! Gorgeous pictures and delicious recipes.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Greg Simpson

    I love this book, wonderful not to complicated recipes that turn out great.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    I won a copy of this in a Goodreads giveaway. Interesting combination of recipes. Nice back stories, clear instructions.

  28. 4 out of 5

    GE

    Wonderful collection of recipes that will carry me through the four seasons of my garden. Another wonderful addition to my Beekman 1802 collection. Thank you, Brent and Josh!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Love the Heirloom style of the book. This will be a great keepsake and some yummy looking recipes too!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I didn't read this - I clicked on the wrong thing!

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