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Illusions of Reality: Naturalist Painting, Photography, Theatre and Cinema, 1875-1918

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Capturing realistic images on canvas has been a staple aspiration of western art since the Renaissance development of scientific perspective. At the end of the nineteenth century, however, animated by the invention of photography and cinema, artists began attempting not only to paint realistically but also to create images that projected the ethical content of the world ar Capturing realistic images on canvas has been a staple aspiration of western art since the Renaissance development of scientific perspective. At the end of the nineteenth century, however, animated by the invention of photography and cinema, artists began attempting not only to paint realistically but also to create images that projected the ethical content of the world around them. Illusions of Reality: Naturalist Painting, Photography and Cinema, 1875-1918 traces the development of Naturalism within painting, literature, theater, photography and film, and the relationship among these art forms, paying attention to the way painters such as Jules Adler, Thomas Anshutz, Jules Bastien-Lepage, Emile Claus, Thomas Eakins, Christian Krohg, Gari Melchers, Jules-Alexis Muenier, Fernand Pelez, Jean-Andre Rixens and Anders Zorn, filmmakers such as Andre Antoine, Albert Capellani and Leon Lhermitte and photographers such as Peter Henry Emerson, used Naturalism as a vehicle for understanding the lives of ordinary people at a time of great social transformation. Practitioners of Naturalism frequently concerned themselves with the social ills created by industrialization, as well as the social responses to these problems in both public education and religion. Likewise, the transformation brought about by industrialization led many artists to focus on the loss of traditional agrarian culture as well as the political upheaval caused by working conditions in the factories. Technological advances in art, from the development of photography in the first half of the nineteenth century to the emergence of film toward the end of the century, contributed to the interaction among art forms and the attention toward social conditions. Edited by Gabriel P. Weisberg, Professor of Art History at the University of Minnesota, with essays by Weisberg, David Jackson, Willa Silverman and Maartje de Haan, Illusions of Reality offers a fresh interpretation of how Naturalist artists, and the aesthetic they espoused, attempted to understand and explain the rapid and profound changes of their time.


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Capturing realistic images on canvas has been a staple aspiration of western art since the Renaissance development of scientific perspective. At the end of the nineteenth century, however, animated by the invention of photography and cinema, artists began attempting not only to paint realistically but also to create images that projected the ethical content of the world ar Capturing realistic images on canvas has been a staple aspiration of western art since the Renaissance development of scientific perspective. At the end of the nineteenth century, however, animated by the invention of photography and cinema, artists began attempting not only to paint realistically but also to create images that projected the ethical content of the world around them. Illusions of Reality: Naturalist Painting, Photography and Cinema, 1875-1918 traces the development of Naturalism within painting, literature, theater, photography and film, and the relationship among these art forms, paying attention to the way painters such as Jules Adler, Thomas Anshutz, Jules Bastien-Lepage, Emile Claus, Thomas Eakins, Christian Krohg, Gari Melchers, Jules-Alexis Muenier, Fernand Pelez, Jean-Andre Rixens and Anders Zorn, filmmakers such as Andre Antoine, Albert Capellani and Leon Lhermitte and photographers such as Peter Henry Emerson, used Naturalism as a vehicle for understanding the lives of ordinary people at a time of great social transformation. Practitioners of Naturalism frequently concerned themselves with the social ills created by industrialization, as well as the social responses to these problems in both public education and religion. Likewise, the transformation brought about by industrialization led many artists to focus on the loss of traditional agrarian culture as well as the political upheaval caused by working conditions in the factories. Technological advances in art, from the development of photography in the first half of the nineteenth century to the emergence of film toward the end of the century, contributed to the interaction among art forms and the attention toward social conditions. Edited by Gabriel P. Weisberg, Professor of Art History at the University of Minnesota, with essays by Weisberg, David Jackson, Willa Silverman and Maartje de Haan, Illusions of Reality offers a fresh interpretation of how Naturalist artists, and the aesthetic they espoused, attempted to understand and explain the rapid and profound changes of their time.

22 review for Illusions of Reality: Naturalist Painting, Photography, Theatre and Cinema, 1875-1918

  1. 5 out of 5

    Story

    Beautiful book detailing the development of the naturalist aesthetic in painting, photography, film, theatre and literature. The art within is beautiful and moving. Description of book: Capturing realistic images on canvas has been a staple aspiration of western art since the Renaissance development of scientific perspective. At the end of the nineteenth century, however, animated by the invention of photography and cinema, artists began attempting not only to paint realistically but also to creat Beautiful book detailing the development of the naturalist aesthetic in painting, photography, film, theatre and literature. The art within is beautiful and moving. Description of book: Capturing realistic images on canvas has been a staple aspiration of western art since the Renaissance development of scientific perspective. At the end of the nineteenth century, however, animated by the invention of photography and cinema, artists began attempting not only to paint realistically but also to create images that projected the ethical content of the world around them. Illusions of Reality: Naturalist Painting, Photography and Cinema, 1875-1918 traces the development of Naturalism within painting, literature, theater, photography and film, and the relationship among these art forms, paying attention to the way painters such as Jules Adler, Thomas Anshutz, Jules Bastien-Lepage, Emile Claus, Thomas Eakins, Christian Krohg, Gari Melchers, Jules-Alexis Muenier, Fernand Pelez, Jean-Andre Rixens and Anders Zorn, filmmakers such as Andre Antoine, Albert Capellani and Leon Lhermitte and photographers such as Peter Henry Emerson, used Naturalism as a vehicle for understanding the lives of ordinary people at a time of great social transformation. Practitioners of Naturalism frequently concerned themselves with the social ills created by industrialization, as well as the social responses to these problems in both public education and religion. Likewise, the transformation brought about by industrialization led many artists to focus on the loss of traditional agrarian culture as well as the political upheaval caused by working conditions in the factories. Technological advances in art, from the development of photography in the first half of the nineteenth century to the emergence of film toward the end of the century, contributed to the interaction among art forms and the attention toward social conditions. Edited by Gabriel P. Weisberg, Professor of Art History at the University of Minnesota, with essays by Weisberg, David Jackson, Willa Silverman and Maartje de Haan, Illusions of Reality offers a fresh interpretation of how Naturalist artists, and the aesthetic they espoused, attempted to understand and explain the rapid and profound changes of their time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eszter Földi

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jill Goodrich

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zijperspace

  5. 4 out of 5

    Todd Casey

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jan Ouden

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jan Noelmans

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marian

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alfonso

  12. 5 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

  13. 4 out of 5

    Atmospheric Eric

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ritika

  15. 5 out of 5

    Qingma

  16. 4 out of 5

    Camille

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mahyar Amouzegar

  18. 5 out of 5

    Arthurine Pierson

  19. 5 out of 5

    Juan Li

  20. 5 out of 5

    Yana Stoycheva

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra Leedom

  22. 4 out of 5

    GDS

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