counter create hit The Old Peabody Pew by Kate Douglas Wiggin, Fiction, Historical, United States, People & Places, Readers - Chapter Books - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Old Peabody Pew by Kate Douglas Wiggin, Fiction, Historical, United States, People & Places, Readers - Chapter Books

Availability: Ready to download

The Dorcas society of the little church has set its collective mind to the task of re-dressing the floors -- which means cleaning the pews, too -- and if they cannot have it done by Thanksgiving, why, then, let it be by Christmas. Nancy Wentworth, at thirty-five the most vivacious of them, with her youth undimmed by her work as teacher, throws herself into the work, even t The Dorcas society of the little church has set its collective mind to the task of re-dressing the floors -- which means cleaning the pews, too -- and if they cannot have it done by Thanksgiving, why, then, let it be by Christmas. Nancy Wentworth, at thirty-five the most vivacious of them, with her youth undimmed by her work as teacher, throws herself into the work, even the dirty business of scrubbing. She begins to clean the Peabody Pew, which starts Mrs. Sargent into the subject of that worthless Peabody son, long missing. "I know there's a Peabody still alive and doing business in Detroit," Mrs. Burbank says then, "for I got his address a week ago, and I wrote asking if he would send a few dollars toward repairing the old church." Nancy turns her face to the wall and silently wipes at the paint of the wainscoting. The blood that has rushed into her cheeks at Mrs. Sargent's jeering reference to Justin Peabody still lingers there, for anyone at all to read. From a literary point of view Wiggin's childhood was most distinctive for her encounter with the novelist Charles Dickens. Her mother and another relative had gone to hear Dickens read in Portland, but Wiggin, aged 11, was thought to be too young to warrant an expensive ticket. The following day, however, she found herself on the same train as Dickens and engaged him in a lively conversation for the course of the journey, an experience which she later detailed in a short memoir, A Child's Journey with Dickens (1912).


Compare

The Dorcas society of the little church has set its collective mind to the task of re-dressing the floors -- which means cleaning the pews, too -- and if they cannot have it done by Thanksgiving, why, then, let it be by Christmas. Nancy Wentworth, at thirty-five the most vivacious of them, with her youth undimmed by her work as teacher, throws herself into the work, even t The Dorcas society of the little church has set its collective mind to the task of re-dressing the floors -- which means cleaning the pews, too -- and if they cannot have it done by Thanksgiving, why, then, let it be by Christmas. Nancy Wentworth, at thirty-five the most vivacious of them, with her youth undimmed by her work as teacher, throws herself into the work, even the dirty business of scrubbing. She begins to clean the Peabody Pew, which starts Mrs. Sargent into the subject of that worthless Peabody son, long missing. "I know there's a Peabody still alive and doing business in Detroit," Mrs. Burbank says then, "for I got his address a week ago, and I wrote asking if he would send a few dollars toward repairing the old church." Nancy turns her face to the wall and silently wipes at the paint of the wainscoting. The blood that has rushed into her cheeks at Mrs. Sargent's jeering reference to Justin Peabody still lingers there, for anyone at all to read. From a literary point of view Wiggin's childhood was most distinctive for her encounter with the novelist Charles Dickens. Her mother and another relative had gone to hear Dickens read in Portland, but Wiggin, aged 11, was thought to be too young to warrant an expensive ticket. The following day, however, she found herself on the same train as Dickens and engaged him in a lively conversation for the course of the journey, an experience which she later detailed in a short memoir, A Child's Journey with Dickens (1912).

30 review for The Old Peabody Pew by Kate Douglas Wiggin, Fiction, Historical, United States, People & Places, Readers - Chapter Books

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Morris

    3.5 stars I enjoyed this sweet story. While there wasn't much in the way of excitement or action (besides cleaning the church), it was just right for a Christmas read. And I loved the ending. 3.5 stars I enjoyed this sweet story. While there wasn't much in the way of excitement or action (besides cleaning the church), it was just right for a Christmas read. And I loved the ending.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    A sweet, quick Christmas romance centered around a church's renovations with the sort of shrewd, witty observations of village life and personalities that fans of certain well-known British authoresses might enjoy. Surprisingly "girl power" in some ways, too. On Project Gutenberg. A sweet, quick Christmas romance centered around a church's renovations with the sort of shrewd, witty observations of village life and personalities that fans of certain well-known British authoresses might enjoy. Surprisingly "girl power" in some ways, too. On Project Gutenberg.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    When the Dorcas Society of the Tory Hill Meeting House - a Ladies Aid Society devoted to the upkeep and improvement of that historic church - decide to clean and decorate (as much as they are able) the pews in their beloved house of worship for the Christmas holiday, each member agrees to take charge of her own family's pew, and that of surrounding pews. So it is that it falls to thirty-five-year-old teacher, Nancy Wentworth, to clean the eponymous Peabody pew, stirring memories of her almost ro When the Dorcas Society of the Tory Hill Meeting House - a Ladies Aid Society devoted to the upkeep and improvement of that historic church - decide to clean and decorate (as much as they are able) the pews in their beloved house of worship for the Christmas holiday, each member agrees to take charge of her own family's pew, and that of surrounding pews. So it is that it falls to thirty-five-year-old teacher, Nancy Wentworth, to clean the eponymous Peabody pew, stirring memories of her almost romance, many years before, with Justin Peabody, who went west to seek his fortune, taking her heart with him. It is the day before Christmas as she works, and a strange man - or is he? - comes to the church, and watches her... A lovely, old-fashioned Christmas romance, set in a pacturesque New England village in Maine, The Old Peabody Pew: A Christmas Romance of a Country Church was inspired by author Kate Douglas Wiggin's own church, the First Congregational Church of Buxton, Maine - also known as the Tory Hill Meeting House. Apparently the play that is based upon the novel is still performed every year, at that historic church. However that may be, this was a sweet, if fairly slight, little holiday confection, one that I read in an hour, and enjoyed. The only Wiggin I had read previously was the classic Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm , but I have been meaning to read some of the author's Christmas tales, of which there are a few. I'm glad to have finally done so, and recommend this one to anyone in the mood for a sweet, old-fashioned holiday romance, with a New England flavor.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    I remember as a small (but literate) child, examining books in my aunt's bookshelf and being told "Oh, you don't want that, that's just The Old Peabody Pew." (Of course as a seven-year-old I thought this was a hilarious title!) Recently, I realized that this tale fit into the category of Christmas stories, one of my reading interests, and Maine stories, another, so I ordered a copy. Unfortunately the cheapest one turned out to be a print-on-demand version and I noticed a couple of odd blank spot I remember as a small (but literate) child, examining books in my aunt's bookshelf and being told "Oh, you don't want that, that's just The Old Peabody Pew." (Of course as a seven-year-old I thought this was a hilarious title!) Recently, I realized that this tale fit into the category of Christmas stories, one of my reading interests, and Maine stories, another, so I ordered a copy. Unfortunately the cheapest one turned out to be a print-on-demand version and I noticed a couple of odd blank spots, so I think now I will look for an older used copy to replace it for my permanent collection. Many readers now might be put off by the somewhat flowery writing, but I happen to like it. There is a great deal of humor in the descriptions of the Dorcas Society (Ladies' Aid) of the small-town church and their battles with the (male) trustees over the condition of the church building. One of the ladies even imagines a future with female deacons! Finally, their project of re-carpeting at least some of the sanctuary leads to an unexpected return of romance in the life of one of the younger members. A charming little story by a Maine writer better known for her children's books. Recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katja Labonté

    4 stars & 4/10 hearts. My favourite thing about Wiggins is how she makes the country people live. I love the quaint, humorous way they talk and think. There is so much beauty in this story, as well as humour; some bittersweetness and hope; and a lovely message. Justin was a sweet boy, and Nancy was a dear. I loved how pure the romance was (only hand-holding!). It’s just a sweet, uplifting story.   A Favourite Quote: “He looked himself full in the face, recognizing his weakness, and in this suprem 4 stars & 4/10 hearts. My favourite thing about Wiggins is how she makes the country people live. I love the quaint, humorous way they talk and think. There is so much beauty in this story, as well as humour; some bittersweetness and hope; and a lovely message. Justin was a sweet boy, and Nancy was a dear. I loved how pure the romance was (only hand-holding!). It’s just a sweet, uplifting story.   A Favourite Quote: “He looked himself full in the face, recognizing his weakness, and in this supremest moment of recognition he was a stronger man than he had been an hour before.” A Favourite Beautiful Quote: “Her waving dark hair had loosened and fallen over her cheeks, and her eyes gleamed from under it wistfully. Nowadays Nancy’s eyes never had the sparkle of gazing into the future, but always the liquid softness that comes from looking backward.” A Favourite Humorous Quote: “‘The youngest son has just died in New York, so I hear.’ “‘What ailed him?’ inquired Maria Sharp. “‘I guess he was completely wore out takin’ care of his health,’ returned Mrs. Sargent. ‘He had a splendid constitution from a boy, but he was always afraid it wouldn’t last him.’”

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    a lovely, sweet, old-fashioned romance

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Abe

    The story line is simple... with a hint of equal rights for women weaved in. The illustrations are outstanding, and there is a frame of decorations on every page!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    A simple little story. 3.5 stars. A long desired romance, the old church gossipers, a hard working brave young woman, and an unsure unlucky but driven young man. It’s everything you’d expect it to be, and have the ending you want. Very quick read, but also not too much intrigue to it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Mead

    Christmas and a 'Dorcas society' and a long awaited culmination to a sweet romance.. This almost reminds me of one of L.M. Montgomery's short stories. Sweet and wholesome with some good old-fashioned country charm. Christmas and a 'Dorcas society' and a long awaited culmination to a sweet romance.. This almost reminds me of one of L.M. Montgomery's short stories. Sweet and wholesome with some good old-fashioned country charm.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amaryah

    Delightful. Just a short, sweet story with a little bit of humor and romance. Perfect for an afternoon read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bud Russell

    An enjoyable story for the Advent season.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Janis

    The book gets off to a bit of a slow start, but I enjoyed it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Teri

    I loved this sweet novella. Quick fun read at Christmas time.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    Delightful! Chose this rating because I very much enjoyed this little book. The characters are delightful and the town is picturesque. Requiring a minimum number of characters does discourage sharing thoughts.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Maybe the other review I read of this story was just too glowing. Maybe I simply thought it would be different. Whatever the case, this will not be one that goes on my Christmas re-reads list. The idyllic setting can't erase the impossibilities or the irreverence. I love the descriptions of the place, but the people leave a lot to be desired. The women and the author frequently joke at the expense of men. Church gets reduced to a mere social circle with different denominations vying for more att Maybe the other review I read of this story was just too glowing. Maybe I simply thought it would be different. Whatever the case, this will not be one that goes on my Christmas re-reads list. The idyllic setting can't erase the impossibilities or the irreverence. I love the descriptions of the place, but the people leave a lot to be desired. The women and the author frequently joke at the expense of men. Church gets reduced to a mere social circle with different denominations vying for more attractive buildings. And honestly, it's not romantic for a young woman to wait 10 years for an undeclared lover to return. That sounds more like foolishness to me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Another charming Christmas tale from Kate Douglas Wiggin. This one tells the story of the Dorcas Society in a small Maine town. This is a society, formed from the women in the community, for the purpose of renovating their church building. Just before Christmas they are putting on the finishing touches; laying new carpet, washing the pews and mending the cushions. Of course there is a little love story that ends happily. I enjoyed learning about the Dorcas Society and their good works. I found t Another charming Christmas tale from Kate Douglas Wiggin. This one tells the story of the Dorcas Society in a small Maine town. This is a society, formed from the women in the community, for the purpose of renovating their church building. Just before Christmas they are putting on the finishing touches; laying new carpet, washing the pews and mending the cushions. Of course there is a little love story that ends happily. I enjoyed learning about the Dorcas Society and their good works. I found the sense of community old fashioned in the very best way.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stephan Peters

    The first chapter was really good, Wiggin had some real knowledge of personality intertaction of busybodies in a small town. The romance - well it sucked. Lots of plot holes. What happened to that farm? Cheesy lines you would find on a 'worst pick up lines ever" website: "What's wanted, is you." "Deep in the combs of her heart was honey waiting to be harvested." OMG! Like Cheeze city... and predictable, too. Was a waste of time, though the first chapter was enjoyable. The first chapter was really good, Wiggin had some real knowledge of personality intertaction of busybodies in a small town. The romance - well it sucked. Lots of plot holes. What happened to that farm? Cheesy lines you would find on a 'worst pick up lines ever" website: "What's wanted, is you." "Deep in the combs of her heart was honey waiting to be harvested." OMG! Like Cheeze city... and predictable, too. Was a waste of time, though the first chapter was enjoyable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Keith

    I love historical fiction and this novella, written in 1905, was a treat for me. The characters were spot on for a quaint New England group of church ladies. The language and certain nuances may seem strange to some, but you have to remember it is a true turn of the century tale and the language is authentic to the time.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura Bang

    Wiggin narrates this enjoyable little story of New England country in the early 20th century with affection and gentle humor. Also contains this amazing metaphor: "Nancy had been storing up fidelity and affection deep, deep in the hive of her heart all these years, and now the honey of her helpfulness stood ready to be gathered." Wiggin narrates this enjoyable little story of New England country in the early 20th century with affection and gentle humor. Also contains this amazing metaphor: "Nancy had been storing up fidelity and affection deep, deep in the hive of her heart all these years, and now the honey of her helpfulness stood ready to be gathered."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    A nostalgic and sentimental tale of an old New England town, which has lost its menfolk to urbanization and war. The novel is populated with the remaining widows and old maids, who's life center's around rehabilitating their church. The romance of the story centers around the old Peabody pew, which has been left vacant, until Christmas day. A nostalgic and sentimental tale of an old New England town, which has lost its menfolk to urbanization and war. The novel is populated with the remaining widows and old maids, who's life center's around rehabilitating their church. The romance of the story centers around the old Peabody pew, which has been left vacant, until Christmas day.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Yibbie

    It mixes Christmas nostalgia with love long deferred and creates a sweet story. She seamlessly moves from regretful reminisces to joyful surprise. Two very ordinary people finally see each other. It's a very fun short-story. It mixes Christmas nostalgia with love long deferred and creates a sweet story. She seamlessly moves from regretful reminisces to joyful surprise. Two very ordinary people finally see each other. It's a very fun short-story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    A pure delight to read. I could envision these crafty village women and feel the Christmas warmth from the church. Quirky characters and elegant writing style and a soft nod to love.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hope

    If you like vintage novels, you'll enjoy this easy, sentimental read. If you like vintage novels, you'll enjoy this easy, sentimental read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amyem

    https://librivox.org/the-old-peabody-... https://librivox.org/the-old-peabody-...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Janet

  26. 4 out of 5

    Abby

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christy Whitsell

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bill Clugston

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.