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Will Medicine Stop the Pain?: Finding God's Healing for Depression, Anxiety, and Other Troubling Emotions

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Twice as many women as men will experience depression sometime in their lives, and episodes for women are likely to start at earlier ages, last longer, and recur more frequently, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians (www.aafp.org). Many women are given medication to treat the disease, but medication alone does not always address the underlying emotions wh Twice as many women as men will experience depression sometime in their lives, and episodes for women are likely to start at earlier ages, last longer, and recur more frequently, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians (www.aafp.org). Many women are given medication to treat the disease, but medication alone does not always address the underlying emotions which trouble the mind and spirit. Counselor Elyse Fitzpatrick and Dr. Laura Hendrickson provide biblical guidance on how to balance medical intervention with biblical encouragement.


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Twice as many women as men will experience depression sometime in their lives, and episodes for women are likely to start at earlier ages, last longer, and recur more frequently, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians (www.aafp.org). Many women are given medication to treat the disease, but medication alone does not always address the underlying emotions wh Twice as many women as men will experience depression sometime in their lives, and episodes for women are likely to start at earlier ages, last longer, and recur more frequently, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians (www.aafp.org). Many women are given medication to treat the disease, but medication alone does not always address the underlying emotions which trouble the mind and spirit. Counselor Elyse Fitzpatrick and Dr. Laura Hendrickson provide biblical guidance on how to balance medical intervention with biblical encouragement.

30 review for Will Medicine Stop the Pain?: Finding God's Healing for Depression, Anxiety, and Other Troubling Emotions

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Most of us have been confronted at some time with Emotion-Altering drugs, from antidepressants to amphetamines, and if you haven't, brace yourself- because you will. This book offers a balanced, biblical perspective on this highly controversial and confusing topic. Fitzpatrick points out that (like so many other areas) the foundation of American Medicine is rotten in evolutionary thinking. Instead of viewing people as both physical and spiritual beings, with an outer and inner man, with a brain Most of us have been confronted at some time with Emotion-Altering drugs, from antidepressants to amphetamines, and if you haven't, brace yourself- because you will. This book offers a balanced, biblical perspective on this highly controversial and confusing topic. Fitzpatrick points out that (like so many other areas) the foundation of American Medicine is rotten in evolutionary thinking. Instead of viewing people as both physical and spiritual beings, with an outer and inner man, with a brain and a soul, modern American medicine sees man as merely a nice looking chemical accident. So, when dealing with emotional issues like depression, the problem is a chemical imbalance or misfiring of the brain and the solution is to find the right chemical balance by experimenting with various drugs (starting with the company that brought lunch to the office that day). And the result? More depression and a sky- rocketing suicide rate. To hear the Christian argument and solution, you will just have to get this book. I highly recommend it! The chapters "Lord, Why Do You Let Me Hurt?" and "Why Did You Hurt Your Son?" were especially helpful.

  2. 5 out of 5

    John Brackbill

    I got this book from a footnote in another counseling book thinking it was to a general audience about medicine for areas of spiritual struggle and the sufficiency of Christ. However, it is specifically directed at women on that theme. I am glad I read it because it will be a resource that I will recommend. The authors appropriately and biblically counsel women on depression, anxiety, and other troubling emotions in a way that leans on the sufficiency of Christ without denying the validity of me I got this book from a footnote in another counseling book thinking it was to a general audience about medicine for areas of spiritual struggle and the sufficiency of Christ. However, it is specifically directed at women on that theme. I am glad I read it because it will be a resource that I will recommend. The authors appropriately and biblically counsel women on depression, anxiety, and other troubling emotions in a way that leans on the sufficiency of Christ without denying the validity of medications for verified physical issues and/or situations where the only way to prevent a person from harming themselves or others is through medication. There are appropriate warnings about coming off of a medication without physician assistance even if someone comes to the conclusion that they were proscribed medication for a spiritual issue. They write with tact, care, and biblical courage to those in the church who are increasingly being swept away by our culture's rejection of our immaterial part existing or having anything to do with struggles in this life.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Will Medicine Stop the Pain? was written by women for women. However, for those of us in the counseling end of ministry it was very revealing and eye opening. The parts about the medicine were very good. Many questions were raised for me that I had not thought of before. For example, when under normal circumstances a woman mentions that she has been a bit depressed, doctors usually give them a test or a battery of tests to see if their hormones are out of balance. If they are, they are given the Will Medicine Stop the Pain? was written by women for women. However, for those of us in the counseling end of ministry it was very revealing and eye opening. The parts about the medicine were very good. Many questions were raised for me that I had not thought of before. For example, when under normal circumstances a woman mentions that she has been a bit depressed, doctors usually give them a test or a battery of tests to see if their hormones are out of balance. If they are, they are given the appropriate hormone or treatment to bring them back into balance. But if the women has just given birth and becomes depressed, they automatically have what is called postpartum depression. When this is the diagnosis, the doctors immediately whisk the woman off to a psychologist or psychiatrist for treatment for the depression. They say that the problem is hormones being out of balance because of having just had a baby. But instead of testing for hormone imbalances, they automatically give depression medication. There are never any tests at all. Why is this? I have also come to think that we don't know enough about what is going on inside people's bodies to automatically say that if they come to Christ, and stop their sin, their bodies will automatically get better. Even if the body is reacting to a sinful life, stopping the sin may not restore the body. In this case the person will have to learn to trust God with the physical ailment. The most we can say, in many instances, is that "you may have to live with the consequences of sin in your life." Another idea that I remembered as I read this book is that the man born blind in John 9 had not sinned nor had his parents, yet he was blind. Not everyone is physically sick because of sin in their lives. Usually, they are, but we need to remember that unless you can point to the sin, a person might just need to learn to live with the pain "before the face of God." Even if a person doesn't agree with the author's take on medication, they will find a wealth of information regarding depression, anxiety, moods, and actual brain damage.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nate Brooks

    Fitzpatrick and Hendrickson have written a clear, well-balanced approach to medication and sanctification. Too often biblical counselors can be typecast as being anti-medication reductionists who reject science in favor of a simple hope that prayer and reading the Bible will change people. This book makes clear that painting biblical counselors in this manner is nothing more than a straw-man. The authors begin by describing the different foundations that modern pharmacology and the church are of Fitzpatrick and Hendrickson have written a clear, well-balanced approach to medication and sanctification. Too often biblical counselors can be typecast as being anti-medication reductionists who reject science in favor of a simple hope that prayer and reading the Bible will change people. This book makes clear that painting biblical counselors in this manner is nothing more than a straw-man. The authors begin by describing the different foundations that modern pharmacology and the church are often built upon. Mood-altering medication is often seen as a solution because of an assumption that human beings are material beings only. This presupposition is incompatible with Christian doctrine. Instead, our physical bodies are only one half of the equation. As an MD, Hendrickson provides valuable insight into what is genuinely science and what is merely pseudoscience posturing for greater acceptance than is warranted. This book is not an academic textbook, but is easily accessible for any reader. I highly recommend it to anyone who is on or interested in mood-altering medication.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Landon

    As counseling student, and someone who has read a lot of counseling books, the first half of the book was a lot of overview that I didn't personally need. I found myself tempted to skim much of it, but the second half of the book really picked up, which is why I rated it four stars. The authors do a good job of addressing physical issues related to the body and how that affects the soul (heart/mind). While acknowledging the interplay between both body and soul, they never back down from addressi As counseling student, and someone who has read a lot of counseling books, the first half of the book was a lot of overview that I didn't personally need. I found myself tempted to skim much of it, but the second half of the book really picked up, which is why I rated it four stars. The authors do a good job of addressing physical issues related to the body and how that affects the soul (heart/mind). While acknowledging the interplay between both body and soul, they never back down from addressing the hope we have from depending on the gospel of Jesus and His Word. That doesn't mean people with real mental and physical issues don't need medicine or physical care, but that the end of such care ought to minimize the effects of the body on the heart so that a person can be fully alive to the emotional and spiritual realities that sets a person truly free.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    I read this book recently as part of our church's Reading Roundabout scheme (ie not because I felt the need to read a book on Anxiety and Depression). While I wouldn't like to give this book to someone who is in the depths of despair, I think it is a very beneficial book for Christian ladies (or men, although it is written for ladies) who feel the need to take medication to help with painful emotions they experience. Please note the authors of this book do NOT recommend just giving up medication I read this book recently as part of our church's Reading Roundabout scheme (ie not because I felt the need to read a book on Anxiety and Depression). While I wouldn't like to give this book to someone who is in the depths of despair, I think it is a very beneficial book for Christian ladies (or men, although it is written for ladies) who feel the need to take medication to help with painful emotions they experience. Please note the authors of this book do NOT recommend just giving up medication altogether. You can read a comprehensive review here. http://www.discerningreader.com/book-... This is certainly a book I am glad I have read to be able to offer advice to those struggling with Depression related symptoms or to consider it's contents during low periods of life.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Indihar

    THE best book on emotional disorders I have ever read! Gives true Biblical answers to the highly controversial topic of antidepressants, giving hope to women who have struggled with their emotions for years. Highly recommended for any and all women who are on antidepressants or are being recommended to start using them. God's grace is enough for all of us! THE best book on emotional disorders I have ever read! Gives true Biblical answers to the highly controversial topic of antidepressants, giving hope to women who have struggled with their emotions for years. Highly recommended for any and all women who are on antidepressants or are being recommended to start using them. God's grace is enough for all of us!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lynette Karg

    An excellent, thorough, and Biblical look at this topic. The authors carefully examine current thinking on emotional issues and compare it to Scripture, revealing a sharp contrast. There is much practical help and hope in these pages for those struggling and those walking alongside them.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    A good book, I would recommend reading it all, including the Appendices!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Hensley

    Very good for women battling with psychotropic drugs and needing help.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Guilherme Nunes

    Belo, simples e profundo.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carl Pelz

    Dr. Laura Hendrickson, a psychiatrist and biblical counselor, provides helpful delineation of physiologically based vs spiritual based causation of afflictions such as depression and bipolar II.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  14. 5 out of 5

    Corrie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Teighe

  16. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Kolstad

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jenny McCorvey West

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kari

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Slawik

  20. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Lord

  23. 4 out of 5

    sophia

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  25. 4 out of 5

    Thibodeaux

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ursina

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tara

  29. 5 out of 5

    Abanoob Remon Reyad

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

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