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Monday, the lowest point of the week. A day of dark impulses. A day to snatch a child from the streets ... The abduction of five-year-old Matthew Farraday provokes a national outcry and a desperate police hunt. And when a picture of his face is splashed over the newspapers, psychotherapist Frieda Klein is left troubled: one of her patients has been relating dreams in which Monday, the lowest point of the week. A day of dark impulses. A day to snatch a child from the streets ... The abduction of five-year-old Matthew Farraday provokes a national outcry and a desperate police hunt. And when a picture of his face is splashed over the newspapers, psychotherapist Frieda Klein is left troubled: one of her patients has been relating dreams in which he has a hunger for a child. A child he can describe in perfect detail, a child the spitting image of Matthew. Detective Chief Inspector Karlsson doesn't take Frieda's concerns seriously until a link emerges with an unsolved child abduction twenty years ago and he summons Frieda to interview the victim's sister, hoping she can stir hidden memories. Before long, Frieda is at the center of the race to track the kidnapper. But her race isn't physical. She must chase down the darkest paths of a psychopath's mind to find the answers to Matthew Farraday's whereabouts. And sometimes the mind is the deadliest place to lose yourself.


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Monday, the lowest point of the week. A day of dark impulses. A day to snatch a child from the streets ... The abduction of five-year-old Matthew Farraday provokes a national outcry and a desperate police hunt. And when a picture of his face is splashed over the newspapers, psychotherapist Frieda Klein is left troubled: one of her patients has been relating dreams in which Monday, the lowest point of the week. A day of dark impulses. A day to snatch a child from the streets ... The abduction of five-year-old Matthew Farraday provokes a national outcry and a desperate police hunt. And when a picture of his face is splashed over the newspapers, psychotherapist Frieda Klein is left troubled: one of her patients has been relating dreams in which he has a hunger for a child. A child he can describe in perfect detail, a child the spitting image of Matthew. Detective Chief Inspector Karlsson doesn't take Frieda's concerns seriously until a link emerges with an unsolved child abduction twenty years ago and he summons Frieda to interview the victim's sister, hoping she can stir hidden memories. Before long, Frieda is at the center of the race to track the kidnapper. But her race isn't physical. She must chase down the darkest paths of a psychopath's mind to find the answers to Matthew Farraday's whereabouts. And sometimes the mind is the deadliest place to lose yourself.

30 review for Blue Monday

  1. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    This is pretty good for a first effort, although I think it needs a touch of refinement. The "surprise" toward the end regarding the crime wasn't a surprise to me at all, and I can't imagine why it wouldn't have occurred to our heroine, Dr. Klein, or the police involved. It was too obvious. For the first half, though, it was a bit murky to see how this would all evolve - making the "Duh"-ness of the ending more of a let-down, in a way. There are some extraneous characters who, although colorful, This is pretty good for a first effort, although I think it needs a touch of refinement. The "surprise" toward the end regarding the crime wasn't a surprise to me at all, and I can't imagine why it wouldn't have occurred to our heroine, Dr. Klein, or the police involved. It was too obvious. For the first half, though, it was a bit murky to see how this would all evolve - making the "Duh"-ness of the ending more of a let-down, in a way. There are some extraneous characters who, although colorful, don't all add much to the tale but clutter. If this is really the nascent book of a series, presumably the first of seven, do we really have to meet everyone Frieda knows all at once? Save something for Tuesday, guys! I also found the relationship between Frieda and Karlsson, the head investigator with the police, to be odd. It was sometimes hostile, then not, and it was hard to tell why he was listening to Frieda's ideas when they seemed to mostly annoy him. He needs to be given clearer motivations and characterization going forward; even with a backstory, he still seemed like a bit of a sketch than a man to me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    I’m going through a spell of jumping back to the first book in a series of which I’d enjoyed on of the later entires, this time I’d already read Saturday Requiem by the husband and wife duo of Sean French and Nikki Gerrard. The debut of their series main protagonist is a solid start for psychologists Frieda Klein. Whilst the case that she was involved in wasn’t the most gripping, I felt her traits were well established early on as she’s slightly detached from those around her. The London setting al I’m going through a spell of jumping back to the first book in a series of which I’d enjoyed on of the later entires, this time I’d already read Saturday Requiem by the husband and wife duo of Sean French and Nikki Gerrard. The debut of their series main protagonist is a solid start for psychologists Frieda Klein. Whilst the case that she was involved in wasn’t the most gripping, I felt her traits were well established early on as she’s slightly detached from those around her. The London setting also feels very prominent throughout this missing child storyline, but it was Ukrainian builder Josef who really stood out. I find that I prefer this duo’s standalone stories but would be quite happy to read the second novel in this series at some point...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Fictionophile

    As a long-time fan of Nicci French novels I was delighted when my ‘in-person’ bookclub, Whodunit, selected “Blue Monday” as our group read for the month of September. The first novel to feature Frieda Klein, a solitary, sometimes stern, unmarried, childless woman in early middle-age who works as a psychoanalyst in London. Frieda’s character fascinated me. She is a study in contrasts. She is a risk taker with seemingly little regard for her own personal safety. She goes for solitary walks through L As a long-time fan of Nicci French novels I was delighted when my ‘in-person’ bookclub, Whodunit, selected “Blue Monday” as our group read for the month of September. The first novel to feature Frieda Klein, a solitary, sometimes stern, unmarried, childless woman in early middle-age who works as a psychoanalyst in London. Frieda’s character fascinated me. She is a study in contrasts. She is a risk taker with seemingly little regard for her own personal safety. She goes for solitary walks through London in the dead of night to tire herself when suffering from insomnia. She doesn’t have a cell phone, preferring to be adrift and out of contact when not at work. Yet… Frieda loves her house, a dark and comfortable oasis which she deems a place of cleanliness and sanctuary. She has a penchant for structure, rules, and orderliness. Frieda loves London and the affection of place is obvious in the atmospheric “Blue Monday”. However, she holds little affection for her family whom she feels do not value her, nor she them. She prefers the well denoted boundaries of her work relationships to those of a personal nature, though recently she has fallen for a man whose presence could upset the structure of her well-ordered life. Will her longing and affection for him allow her to forfeit the life she has built for herself? When one of Freida’s clients leads her to believe that he may be implicated in a child abduction, Frieda surrenders her professional ethics and goes to the police. The policeman in charge of the case is at first skeptical, but she ultimately wins his trust and professional respect. Together they chase down leads and encounter shocking revelations whilst searching for a young, abducted boy. They discover that this case may be linked to another similar case which took place over twenty years ago… Many themes are touched upon in “Blue Monday“. Professional ethics, guilt, nature vs. nurture, the merits of psychoanalysis, the damage caused by child abduction, human foibles, secrets, and more. A thought-provoking, fast-paced, well written thriller containing several twists and a surprise ending, this novel will appeal to fans of psychological suspense. I always enjoy novels which accurately portray the contradictions and uncertainties inherent in human behavior and this one does that very successfully. Highly recommended. This review was originally published on my blog: Fictionophile

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ammar

    A really solid strong start of a series Frieda Klein Therapist Has a safe place for patients A patient may be a killer The dilemma She helps the police at their request A fresh pair of eyes She is an insomniac She walks the streets of London Looking at the river Fleet The old rivers of London She helps and needs help She is cold and warm Distance and close Slow start but it builds up quick Everything is connected

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Well I confess to reading this for the shallowest of reasons: I needed a book with a title containing a day of the week or month of the year. And this one looked quite good. And in fact it was! Better than just ok. I think I liked the psychotherapy element to this suspense/ thriller. The main character Freida Klein seems quite a complex character, more to be revealed probably in future instalments. She makes lots of mistakes when she gets involved in a missing child investigation. The ending has Well I confess to reading this for the shallowest of reasons: I needed a book with a title containing a day of the week or month of the year. And this one looked quite good. And in fact it was! Better than just ok. I think I liked the psychotherapy element to this suspense/ thriller. The main character Freida Klein seems quite a complex character, more to be revealed probably in future instalments. She makes lots of mistakes when she gets involved in a missing child investigation. The ending has a twist that you could see a mile off and it was annoying that no one in the story could see it. As a Londoner myself, I liked the fact it was set in London. So, this is recommended as a page turner and as a suspense/ mystery. It's not really a thriller but I liked it enough to read it in almost one sitting. Not bad for a more or less random pick to fulfil a challenge!

  6. 4 out of 5

    ☮Karen

    This finally became available on audio so I grabbed it. Wasn't sure what to expect, but I liked the entire mystery of the missing children a great deal and sped through it pretty quickly, glued to my phone. There is one great twist at the end that had me thanking Nicci French for knowing how to add some zing and add it just when you least expect it. I live for twists, as I may have mentioned before. On to Tuesday. This finally became available on audio so I grabbed it. Wasn't sure what to expect, but I liked the entire mystery of the missing children a great deal and sped through it pretty quickly, glued to my phone. There is one great twist at the end that had me thanking Nicci French for knowing how to add some zing and add it just when you least expect it. I live for twists, as I may have mentioned before. On to Tuesday.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erin (from Long Island, NY)

    This was so much better then I expected! So interesting & just an easy read. The story itself was so good, I was immediately drawn in.. But the star for me was Psychotherapist, Dr Frieda. Very unusual & I could honestly read about her for books & books. (Luckily there are 5 of 6 more!) I’ll definitely be moving right in to the next 1.. So glad I found this series!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    Two children are abducted, 20 years apart. Could there be a connection? Frieda Klein is a psychotherapist and in her first “adventure” one of her patients describes dreams about seeing a boy who is the double of missing five year old Matthew Faraday. When she takes her concerns to the police, however, they don’t really take her seriously in this very tense read. It is a really good psychological read which has you puzzling the fates of the two missing children, especially from about halfway thro Two children are abducted, 20 years apart. Could there be a connection? Frieda Klein is a psychotherapist and in her first “adventure” one of her patients describes dreams about seeing a boy who is the double of missing five year old Matthew Faraday. When she takes her concerns to the police, however, they don’t really take her seriously in this very tense read. It is a really good psychological read which has you puzzling the fates of the two missing children, especially from about halfway through when the penny drops and you realise you have an inkling as to what is going on. It is a very dark read, partly told through the confused eyes of a frightened little boy. Can Frieda put two and two together in time? Frieda is a very complex character with a history and I definitely got the feeling that more of her story is going to come out in future books, it is only hinted at here. What has shaped her into the person she is, living as a “one woman island” in her cosy little nest and wandering the streets by night. I really enjoyed the little clique of friends and relatives around her, who all have their own distinct characteristics, Especially Josef and Rueben. There were times when I thought that Frieda was maybe verging on being a little too “serious minded” for me especially during the slower parts of the read but having said that I didn’t want to put this book down, especially after I reached the halfway stage and would have loved another chapter or two after that ending, which is not strictly speaking a cliffhanger – but one which definitely left me wanting more.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    A while back Louise Penny had posted to Facebook a list of authors she enjoyed. One of these was Alan Bradley for his Flavia de Luce series ("Wow", she remarked), and what a disappointment this was for me. I couldn't get past 24% before chucking it. So before removing the rest of her recommendations from my to-read list, I decided to give her another chance and move on to Nicci French and her (their) ("magnificent", she remarked) Frieda Klein series. Am I ever glad I gave her a mulligan because s A while back Louise Penny had posted to Facebook a list of authors she enjoyed. One of these was Alan Bradley for his Flavia de Luce series ("Wow", she remarked), and what a disappointment this was for me. I couldn't get past 24% before chucking it. So before removing the rest of her recommendations from my to-read list, I decided to give her another chance and move on to Nicci French and her (their) ("magnificent", she remarked) Frieda Klein series. Am I ever glad I gave her a mulligan because she sure hit pay dirt with this one. First, with the "their" above. Nicci French is a pseudonym for a husband and wife writing team. This makes the fluid readability of this novel all the more remarkable. Astounding, really. Years ago, my prime go-to genre was psychological suspense. I still go for this a lot but really hadn't read a whole lot in this genre that really wowed me in recent years, so I kind of let that genre slip by the wayside. Now, along comes a mystery series with a psychoanalyst as its main protagonist. Right. Up. My. Alley. This is a fantastic read. The mystery surrounds child abduction, and unsettlingly so, so...trigger warnings, y'all. The characterization is terrific, especially where Frieda is concerned, and this is an extremely fast read. I could barely put it down for the last quarter (or most of the novel for that matter). There are a couple of things that I had a hard time buying into, namely the trust Frieda and Karlsson put into Josef, and most times, something like this would bother me enough to dock stars. But not this time. This is such a well rolled out story, with terrific dialogue, that I can't possibly give such top notch entertainment less than five stars. Big spoiler here: (view spoiler)[ And, I can't remember the last time a book made me GASP at the end so audibly as this one. I only hope that I didn't spoil this read for my wife, who had just started it next to me on the couch. Although, she will probably have seen that one coming, she always does, dammit... As did others, apparently. I checked out some other less favourable reviews, and they had seen that big thing coming at the end, and they figured the characters were idiots for not to have figured it out before that. I guess I'm stupid too, because she (they) got me, hook, line and sinker, thus the GASP "Oh shit!!" from yours truly. But I'm not complaining. Being stupid does have the benefit of being gleefully surpised. So well done Nicci French. (hide spoiler)] Looking very much forward to book 2!!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    The first couple of offerings by the duo that make up "Nicci French" were unputdownable. I stopped reading several years ago as I felt that the stories had become hackneyed and lacklustre, not to mention tediously predictable. I picked this up last week primarily because the blurb on the back convinced me that this could be something new. Sadly, nothing was further from the case. I brilliant premise became tedious and mundane, and the overall story became more and more unbelievable. Even the fin The first couple of offerings by the duo that make up "Nicci French" were unputdownable. I stopped reading several years ago as I felt that the stories had become hackneyed and lacklustre, not to mention tediously predictable. I picked this up last week primarily because the blurb on the back convinced me that this could be something new. Sadly, nothing was further from the case. I brilliant premise became tedious and mundane, and the overall story became more and more unbelievable. Even the final twist - whilst also totally ludicrous - was sadly obvious from the moment that the final character in its involvement was introduced (trying not to give anything away, but that's making me write in an awful style too - perhaps it's catching?): predictable and ridiculous. It was readable - for the hour or two it took me. But I certainly won't be recommending it, and it#s already gone to the charity shop - almost unheard of in this house where books are read and reread, as well as lent and given to those who might be interested. I am finished with Nicci French for good this time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Polly

    3.5 stars. After a prolonged slow start, Blue Monday took off and I became quite engrossed in the plot twists. I especially liked some of the side characters like Reuben, Frieda Klein’s mentor, and handyman Josef. The developing working relationship between Frieda and Detective Chief Inspector Karlsson, over the disappearance of a young boy, was excellent. But the ending rankled and left me muttering!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Blue Monday by Nicci French is a 2011 publication and is the first book in the Frieda Klein series. I enjoy British mysteries, but rarely get the pleasure of indulging in one these days, but, I have been trying, for a while, to get started on this series after reading several other books by this author. However, I was initially taken aback by how this story started off and the way it seemed to flit from one scene to another with no warning that the entire train of thought has been switched, not Blue Monday by Nicci French is a 2011 publication and is the first book in the Frieda Klein series. I enjoy British mysteries, but rarely get the pleasure of indulging in one these days, but, I have been trying, for a while, to get started on this series after reading several other books by this author. However, I was initially taken aback by how this story started off and the way it seemed to flit from one scene to another with no warning that the entire train of thought has been switched, not to mention the motley crew of characters that also bounced in and out of the story with no particular rhyme or reason. So, the story was at once a dark psychological mystery and offbeat and quirky. It was as though the authors were going for an atmospheric, creepy sort of suspense, but was thwarted by this odd duck cast of characters and their own little personal dramas. Frieda is a psychotherapist that takes on a new patient with various maladies, but, is soon confiding in her about some strange fantasies and dreams, which leads Frieda to believe he may be somehow involved in the disappearance of a young child. Enter Detective Chief Inspector Karlsson, who is working the case and decides to put his skepticism aside and allow Frieda to help with the case. In the meantime, Frieda makes a new friend, loses a lover, and deals with the downfall of her mentor on top of coping with her niece and the approaching Christmas holidays. Anytime a story deals with a missing child there is automatically a feeling of unease and tense emotions. The fate of young child hangs in the balance as Frieda and Karlsson race against time to find him, while connecting the dots in a much older missing persons case. The mind games that proceed with Frieda coaxing information from her patient are odd, edgy, and surreal at times. There are some truly warped and diabolical plot twists along the way, making this a pretty dark thriller. Frieda’s character is hard to get a bead on, but I did like her and found myself hoping she will find some happiness in her personal life at some point in the future. I hope this same group of characters are recurring ones because although I initially found them to be distracting, I ultimately grew to like them and care about their problems. In a strange way they all made a pretty good team. While most of the questions were answered there were a few lingering issues that will haunt Frieda and one huge shocker that left me feeling very ill at ease. The good thing is that there are several more installments of this series and now that I have this first one under my belt, and know what to expect, I’m very curious to see how things will proceed from here. 3.5 stars

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ian Mapp

    After an interesting beginning, and a mid point rally, I could feel the points dropping away from this book as the story took one ridiculous turn after another - getting to the point that the author summed up the books credibility of the story through one of the senior policeman's comments to main investigator. Without giving away anything - he simply stated - "You're not going to say that to the press, are you?" I cannot believe the high levels of reviews here. I read a lot of crime novels but fo After an interesting beginning, and a mid point rally, I could feel the points dropping away from this book as the story took one ridiculous turn after another - getting to the point that the author summed up the books credibility of the story through one of the senior policeman's comments to main investigator. Without giving away anything - he simply stated - "You're not going to say that to the press, are you?" I cannot believe the high levels of reviews here. I read a lot of crime novels but for suspension of disbelief, this takes some beating. And I read Peter James. Its part of a series, and I have a decision to make about whether to give the Tuesday book a go - featuring a psychologist - Frieda Klein. She's kind of interesting - taking midnight rambles around London. They is even a little map of the River Fleet at the beginning of the book - but for the life of me, I am not sure why. She has a patient. Who has dreams about a boy who has been kidnapped. She goes to the police. Not only do they take her seriously, she gets involved in police interviews and eventually solving the mystery. And I wish I could tell you the mystery - so that you can have a good laugh. Its starts off at 8 on the unbelievable scale and then through a simple half page at the end of the book, hits the afterburners and goes off the scale. The cover suggest that Monday is a day for Murder. I'm not even sure if there was a murder - or what day it occurred on. My wife recommended this book to me. Every time we go on hols, she has the latest instalment. We are not currently speaking.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    nutty nuut Description: Monday, the lowest point of the week. A day of dark impulses. A day to snatch a child from the streets ... The abduction of five-year-old Matthew Farraday provokes a national outcry and a desperate police hunt. And when a picture of his face is splashed over the newspapers, psychotherapist Frieda Klein is left troubled: one of her patients has been relating dreams in which he has a hunger for a child. A child he can describe in perfect detail, a child the spitting image of nutty nuut Description: Monday, the lowest point of the week. A day of dark impulses. A day to snatch a child from the streets ... The abduction of five-year-old Matthew Farraday provokes a national outcry and a desperate police hunt. And when a picture of his face is splashed over the newspapers, psychotherapist Frieda Klein is left troubled: one of her patients has been relating dreams in which he has a hunger for a child. A child he can describe in perfect detail, a child the spitting image of Matthew. Detective Chief Inspector Karlsson doesn't take Frieda's concerns seriously until a link emerges with an unsolved child abduction twenty years ago and he summons Frieda to interview the victim's sister, hoping she can stir hidden memories. Before long, Frieda is at the center of the race to track the kidnapper. But her race isn't physical. She must chase down the darkest paths of a psychopath's mind to find the answers to Matthew Farraday's whereabouts. And sometimes the mind is the deadliest place to lose yourself. Opening: 1987: In this city there were many ghosts. She had to take care. She avoided the cracks between the paving stones, skipping and jumping, her feet in their scuffed lace-up shoes landing in the blank spaces. She was nimble at this hopscotch by now. 4* Blue Monday (Frieda Klein, #1) TR Tuesday's Gone (Frieda Klein, #2) 3* Killing Me Softly 4* Beneath the Skin OH Land of the Living TR The Memory Game 3* Catch Me When I Fall TR Safe House 3* Complicit

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    Blue Monday is the first book in the new series called Frieda Klein by Nicci French. After the disappearance of Matthew Faraday, Psychotherapist, Frieda Klein started to worry about one of her patients Alan Dekker. However, at first, Detective Chief Inspector Karlsson did not take her fears seriously until they found a link to a twenty-year-old cold case and Frieda became involved with the investigation. The readers of Blue Monday will continue to follow Frieda Klein to find out what happened to Blue Monday is the first book in the new series called Frieda Klein by Nicci French. After the disappearance of Matthew Faraday, Psychotherapist, Frieda Klein started to worry about one of her patients Alan Dekker. However, at first, Detective Chief Inspector Karlsson did not take her fears seriously until they found a link to a twenty-year-old cold case and Frieda became involved with the investigation. The readers of Blue Monday will continue to follow Frieda Klein to find out what happened to Matthew Faraday. At first, I was not sure I would enjoy reading Blue Monday. However, that changed after turning the first page, and I will read the next book in this series. Nicci French did an excellent job in describing her settings of Blue Monday. I like Nicci French portrayal of Frieda Klein and her other characters in this book and the way they interact with each other. Blue Monday was well written and research by Nicci French. The readers of Blue Monday will learn about the role psychotherapist have in law enforcement investigations. Also, the readers of Blue Monday will see the devastation for families when a child goes missing. I recommend this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    Really enjoyed this first book of a new series. This is a psychological novel, with a psychoanalyst as an aid to the police, and has brilliant twists and turns as they try to save the life of a young boy. Fantastic writing, good characters, Josef is a character I really enjoyed and hope he will be making an appearance in future books. Will appeal to fans of Minette Walters and Sophie Hannah. ARC from NetGalley.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I’ve been a little disappointed in Nicci French’s more recent books – always worth reading, but they seemed to be having difficulty recreating the gripping and tense earlier ones like Secret Smile and Beneath The Skin. But this book is an absolute triumph – a change of direction maybe, but surely the start of a series that can run and run. They’ve always been good at strong female characters – Frieda Klein is wonderful, weird, lovely and endearing with enough quirks and bits of hidden background I’ve been a little disappointed in Nicci French’s more recent books – always worth reading, but they seemed to be having difficulty recreating the gripping and tense earlier ones like Secret Smile and Beneath The Skin. But this book is an absolute triumph – a change of direction maybe, but surely the start of a series that can run and run. They’ve always been good at strong female characters – Frieda Klein is wonderful, weird, lovely and endearing with enough quirks and bits of hidden background slowly revealed to sustain many books to come. DCI Karlsson’s a fascinating character too, with depths you just itch to explore further. Bits of light relief abound – wonderful scene in a restaurant, and Josef’s landing is memorable. But this is a sensitively treated story of child abduction that mesmerises you throughout – you might guess some of the twists (then again...!) but you’ll have a fantastic time getting there. Highly recommended and can’t wait for the next one...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More)

    Blue Monday is a bit hard to pin down as far as genre. It has elements of both a mainstream and a mystery/suspense novel. I think the suspense elements tended to be sacrificed in favor of the exploration of characters and psychoanalysis elements. Nevertheless, it was a pretty good book. Warning: There are aspects that some readers will find disturbing if they are sensitive about children in jeopardy or being harmed. Overall rating: 3.5/5.0 stars. Reviewed for Affaire de Coeur Magazine in the March Blue Monday is a bit hard to pin down as far as genre. It has elements of both a mainstream and a mystery/suspense novel. I think the suspense elements tended to be sacrificed in favor of the exploration of characters and psychoanalysis elements. Nevertheless, it was a pretty good book. Warning: There are aspects that some readers will find disturbing if they are sensitive about children in jeopardy or being harmed. Overall rating: 3.5/5.0 stars. Reviewed for Affaire de Coeur Magazine in the March Issue. http://affairedecoeur.com.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    DNF 42%! I'm sorry to say that this book just didn't work for me. First I listen to the audio book but didn't find the story not the characters interesting. The narrator was not that bad, not a personal favorite but she worked, and it was the story that just didn't intrigue me. Then I tried reading, but the story, the writing style just didn't rock my boat. Do I started to skim and that's when I decided to stop reading all together... DNF 42%! I'm sorry to say that this book just didn't work for me. First I listen to the audio book but didn't find the story not the characters interesting. The narrator was not that bad, not a personal favorite but she worked, and it was the story that just didn't intrigue me. Then I tried reading, but the story, the writing style just didn't rock my boat. Do I started to skim and that's when I decided to stop reading all together...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    A very well crafted story that keeps you interested throughout the book. The writers develope the characters and make them easy to imagine. I will certainly read more from this husband and wife team.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Esther

    This book is a little different from your other detective thrillers. This is the POV from a psychotherapist, what makes it different. When you put the pros and cons next to each other, it was an average book. Pros Nicely written: This book is a nice read and you can speed through it, even if you're not really fond of the book. The story develops very fast and it never feels "slow" in any way. Eventually all the people in this book play their part and add something to the story. Conversations: I LOV This book is a little different from your other detective thrillers. This is the POV from a psychotherapist, what makes it different. When you put the pros and cons next to each other, it was an average book. Pros Nicely written: This book is a nice read and you can speed through it, even if you're not really fond of the book. The story develops very fast and it never feels "slow" in any way. Eventually all the people in this book play their part and add something to the story. Conversations: I LOVED the conversations in this book. It's just a straight up conversation, like the ones in real life. It's not the "he said, she said" thing, with a lot of useless information between the lines. I was looking forward to the conversations the whole book. This was really one of the greater parts, in my opinion. Psychotherapist: The POV in this book is unique to me. I've never read something where a psychotherapist is involved. This gives a whole new layer to the crime genre, what makes this book unique in it's genre. Cons Not thrilling enough: When I finished the book I kinda felt numb. I wasn't thrilled or shocked, I didn't really feel anything. The book never really gets this thrilling vibe, where you want to keep reading to figure out the plot. Frieda Klein: Altough this woman feels like a strong one, who is an expert in her field, she feels cold. It's kinda felt like she doesn't grant herself permission to be happy. She doesn't want the loving boyfriend, she want's to walk in the cold, dark, empty city, she want's to come home alone, to sit there alone, she doesn't want to celebrate Christmas. It felt like too much punishment for herself. I didn't really get an explanation why she is treating herself that way. It interfered with me seeing her as this strong woman. Unbelievable story: The plot as a whole story feels a little bit unbelievable. I can't tell you too much without spoiling, but it's just too much coincidences stacked up on top of each other what makes the plot. I was never really thrilled and at the end of the book I felt a bit like this... This review was first posted on BiteIntoBooks Blog

  22. 5 out of 5

    Candie

    I don't really have a lot to say about this book. It was an entertaining mystery but there was nothing extra exciting or surprising in the book and most of the characters seem like the same characters that you see in many mystery books. I enjoyed it while I was reading it, but it unfortunately won't be that memorable to me. I feel like it may be a good book if you are in a reading slump or looking for just a fun beach read as it is an easy read that feels familiar. I don't really have a lot to say about this book. It was an entertaining mystery but there was nothing extra exciting or surprising in the book and most of the characters seem like the same characters that you see in many mystery books. I enjoyed it while I was reading it, but it unfortunately won't be that memorable to me. I feel like it may be a good book if you are in a reading slump or looking for just a fun beach read as it is an easy read that feels familiar.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    This book was a four star book for me throughout but the ending kicked it up a notch. I will definitely be reading the next in the series. I really liked Frieda and Karlsson and how they interacted with each other...like an old married couple. The story was good although maybe a little bit of a slow burn.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alex Cantone

    She had exposed dreams and fragments of memories, or images that felt like memories, likenesses. Because that was what she did, that was her currency: the things that happened inside people’s heads, the things that made people happy or afraid… In 1987 a young girl, Joanna, is abducted on her way home from a London school. Twenty-two years on, young Matthew Faraday is similarly snatched, leaving families traumatised and police morale low. Enter psychotherapist Dr Frieda Klein, who has inherited a She had exposed dreams and fragments of memories, or images that felt like memories, likenesses. Because that was what she did, that was her currency: the things that happened inside people’s heads, the things that made people happy or afraid… In 1987 a young girl, Joanna, is abducted on her way home from a London school. Twenty-two years on, young Matthew Faraday is similarly snatched, leaving families traumatised and police morale low. Enter psychotherapist Dr Frieda Klein, who has inherited a patient Alan, from her one-time mentor Reuben, who suffers burn-out when his wife finally leaves after years of his philandering. During the sessions the patient reveals dreams or fantasies that included details of the missing boy, days before he was abducted. Running in parallel, Frieda’s lover Sandy has been offered a professorship in the States and asks her to go with him, to start a new life together. But that takes courage and a commitment she does not feel, falling back instead on her practice and family. I had mixed views on this one, co-written by husband and wife authors. The plot was spoiled (for me) by a constellation of dysfunctional individuals who brought little to the narrative, out-of-left-field happenings, and a predictable ending I had worked out half-way through. The standouts: Jack, the trainee therapist who is not overcome by his shortcomings and when sent on a wild goose chase achieves the breakthrough; the villain who plays everyone off a tee; and the descriptions of London. 2.5★ rounded up to 3 for the sketch map. Reading a series in order has its pitfalls, and for me there is nothing here to pique my interest in reading further.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    This mystery by Nicci French (who is actually the British husband-wife writing team of Nicci Gerrard and Sean French) is the first in the Frieda Klein series of novels. Six books, each named after a consecutive day of the week, have been published already, and the seventh, titled Sunday Morning Coming Down is due out in January 2018. As the first in a series of novels, the authors spend extra time introducing us to their main character. Frieda Klein is a psychotherapist in London who often spe This mystery by Nicci French (who is actually the British husband-wife writing team of Nicci Gerrard and Sean French) is the first in the Frieda Klein series of novels. Six books, each named after a consecutive day of the week, have been published already, and the seventh, titled Sunday Morning Coming Down is due out in January 2018. As the first in a series of novels, the authors spend extra time introducing us to their main character. Frieda Klein is a psychotherapist in London who often spends time walking the city alone at night while she thinks, much as Charles Dickens did nearly two hundred years earlier. She is a very orderly person, insisting that her environment remains tidy, perhaps a reaction against the dangerous disorderliness of the world around her. She is in her thirties and unmarried. We meet some of her extended family and a series of friends, mentors, and colleagues. I’m assuming that quite a few of these characters will reappear in later novels. Most of these characters, Frieda Klein especially, are interesting and appealing, a fact that will probably get me to read the rest of the series over time. In this particular book, Klein gets caught up in a police case involving a missing six year-old boy because a client she has reports on his dreams of having a son of his own, a child who seems to be a match for the missing boy. We quickly get drawn into the dark interior of Klein’s client’s mind. In the interest of avoid spoilers, I will only say that the book is a compelling read; it got me to keep turning the pages, even late into the night. There were a few snags here and there, but they were minor. I ended up attributing them to this being the first in a series. Without getting too specific, I will say that I was suspicious of one character because of the way that character was presented and dealt with by Klein. Her judgment seemed off to me. And some information that should have impacted the plot more was dropped; also some things Freida should have noticed, she missed. And the focus on the interior lives of some disturbed people makes this book dark reading, at least a part of the time. Nonetheless, I look forward to reading the other six novels, betting that the fascinating web of characters that probably will recur will keep the darkness from being overbearing. 3.5/5

  26. 5 out of 5

    Heather Burnside

    The crime writing duo of Nicci Gerrard and Sean French are usually two of my favourite authors so I had high expectations for this book, but it didn't quite live up to the same high standards as their earlier work. One of the problems for me was the lengthy character list, which was a challenge to keep track of in the earlier chapters. Another problem was that it took until about a third of the way in until the book really picked up pace. I persevered based on previous books I have read by these The crime writing duo of Nicci Gerrard and Sean French are usually two of my favourite authors so I had high expectations for this book, but it didn't quite live up to the same high standards as their earlier work. One of the problems for me was the lengthy character list, which was a challenge to keep track of in the earlier chapters. Another problem was that it took until about a third of the way in until the book really picked up pace. I persevered based on previous books I have read by these authors, and am glad I did, because, once the book got going, it had some great touches. I enjoyed some of the twists, and found the interesting phenomenon was a great touch - I can't give too many details away without spoiling the plot but I kept an open mind about it and have assumed that the authors' research backed up this phenomenon, hence I have given four stars. There was a great creepy twist towards the end too, which was classic Nicci French. This is the first book in a series so I am assuming that they have deliberately left some threads undone, and I would be interested to find out how they will be dealt with in the next book in the series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jill Hutchinson

    I have read several of the Nicci French books (the nom de plume for a husband and wife writing team) and enjoyed them. This is the first of the Frieda Klein series and I was entranced, although it took a couple of chapters to get used to Dr. Klein who appears to be constantly angst ridden........maybe because she is a psychoanalyst! But once I got comfortable with her personality, the book came together for me. It is almost more of a suspense novel than a mystery but regardless of what the genre I have read several of the Nicci French books (the nom de plume for a husband and wife writing team) and enjoyed them. This is the first of the Frieda Klein series and I was entranced, although it took a couple of chapters to get used to Dr. Klein who appears to be constantly angst ridden........maybe because she is a psychoanalyst! But once I got comfortable with her personality, the book came together for me. It is almost more of a suspense novel than a mystery but regardless of what the genre, the author(s) has a way with words and situations that kept my eyes glued to the pages. It begins with the kidnapping of a 5 year old girl who was never found alive or dead. Jump forward 20 years and another child, this time a 5 year old boy goes missing. Thus begins a twisting and turning story that keeps the reader slightly off-balance and has its share of disturbing scenes (although not violent). It has an ending that you might have seen coming......or possibly not. Regardless, it is worth the wait. I would recommend this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jonetta

    I wasn't quite sure what to make of this book in the beginning with its maddening starkness of plot and overload of details about scene and setting. Once I immersed myself in the story it seemed clear that this approach was fitting for a psychological thriller. Frieda Klein is just as much a mystery, at times highly insightful and incredibly insensitive at others. I found her interesting, enough to need to know her backstory. Though I was able to figure out the twists it was still a very appeali I wasn't quite sure what to make of this book in the beginning with its maddening starkness of plot and overload of details about scene and setting. Once I immersed myself in the story it seemed clear that this approach was fitting for a psychological thriller. Frieda Klein is just as much a mystery, at times highly insightful and incredibly insensitive at others. I found her interesting, enough to need to know her backstory. Though I was able to figure out the twists it was still a very appealing book with a host of very odd characters I'm looking forward to getting to know more intimately.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    Frieda Klein book No. 1: Nicci French ups the game by starting a very good series. The therapist is concerned with the overlaps between a patients dreams and thoughts and a recently kidnapped little boy, so she breaks doctor - patient privilege and goes to the police! A truly captivating and suspenseful thriller, that goes down many dark paths. French also excels in creating fantastic and real feeling supporting characters in this series. 7 out of 12. Frieda Klein book No. 1: Nicci French ups the game by starting a very good series. The therapist is concerned with the overlaps between a patients dreams and thoughts and a recently kidnapped little boy, so she breaks doctor - patient privilege and goes to the police! A truly captivating and suspenseful thriller, that goes down many dark paths. French also excels in creating fantastic and real feeling supporting characters in this series. 7 out of 12.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    This falls into the sub-genre of psychological mystery, in which a case from some time ago (a twenty-two-year-old kidnapping) continues to affect the lives of various people. Here's why I love it: the female therapist doesn't need saving and isn't constantly in danger just from being female, on the contrary, one of Klein's habits is to walk off her insomnia all over London. The violence all takes place off stage and isn't meant to be titillating. The cops are following procedure and trying their This falls into the sub-genre of psychological mystery, in which a case from some time ago (a twenty-two-year-old kidnapping) continues to affect the lives of various people. Here's why I love it: the female therapist doesn't need saving and isn't constantly in danger just from being female, on the contrary, one of Klein's habits is to walk off her insomnia all over London. The violence all takes place off stage and isn't meant to be titillating. The cops are following procedure and trying their best to solve the case. A lot of attention is paid to the effects violent crime has on the families of victims. It acknowledges the benefits and drawbacks of therapy for people with problems not amenable to drug therapy. This is a crime story that doesn't make me cringe as a feminist. I liked everything about it so well, in fact, that I went back and took a star off my ratings for all the Steig Larsson books which were ostensibly feminist, but also deeply problematical. French ranks with Minette Walters, Sarah Rayne, and Barbara Vine for the stand alones, and this looks to be an excellent basis for a series. I'm keen to get on to the next one. personal copy.

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