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Dorothy Day (1897-1980), founder of the Catholic Worker movement, and one of the most prophetic voices in the American Catholic church, has recently been proposed as a candidate for canonization. In this lavishly illustrated biography, Jim Forest provides a compelling portrait of her heroic efforts to live out the radical message of the gospel for our time. A journalist an Dorothy Day (1897-1980), founder of the Catholic Worker movement, and one of the most prophetic voices in the American Catholic church, has recently been proposed as a candidate for canonization. In this lavishly illustrated biography, Jim Forest provides a compelling portrait of her heroic efforts to live out the radical message of the gospel for our time. A journalist and social reformer in her youth, Day surprised her friends with the decision in 1927 to enter the Catholic church. Her conversion, prompted by the birth out of wedlock of her daughter Tamar left her searching for some way to reconcile her faith with her commitment to the poor and social justice. The answer came with her decision to launch The Catholic Worker, both a newspaper and a movement. Enunciating a radical social vision rooted in the gospel, Day and those who joined her devoted themselves to the Works of Mercy while struggling to create a new society "where it is easier to be good." An ardent pacifist, Day was frequently arrested for her protests in the cause of peace. Drawing on her recently published diaries and letters, Forest chronicles her extraordinary journey, with special stress on the unique spiritual vision that underlay her dramatic witness.


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Dorothy Day (1897-1980), founder of the Catholic Worker movement, and one of the most prophetic voices in the American Catholic church, has recently been proposed as a candidate for canonization. In this lavishly illustrated biography, Jim Forest provides a compelling portrait of her heroic efforts to live out the radical message of the gospel for our time. A journalist an Dorothy Day (1897-1980), founder of the Catholic Worker movement, and one of the most prophetic voices in the American Catholic church, has recently been proposed as a candidate for canonization. In this lavishly illustrated biography, Jim Forest provides a compelling portrait of her heroic efforts to live out the radical message of the gospel for our time. A journalist and social reformer in her youth, Day surprised her friends with the decision in 1927 to enter the Catholic church. Her conversion, prompted by the birth out of wedlock of her daughter Tamar left her searching for some way to reconcile her faith with her commitment to the poor and social justice. The answer came with her decision to launch The Catholic Worker, both a newspaper and a movement. Enunciating a radical social vision rooted in the gospel, Day and those who joined her devoted themselves to the Works of Mercy while struggling to create a new society "where it is easier to be good." An ardent pacifist, Day was frequently arrested for her protests in the cause of peace. Drawing on her recently published diaries and letters, Forest chronicles her extraordinary journey, with special stress on the unique spiritual vision that underlay her dramatic witness.

30 review for All Is Grace: A Biography of Dorothy Day

  1. 5 out of 5

    M Christopher

    I noticed an earlier Goodreads reader review that called this book "dry." I can't believe we read the same book. Forest does a terrific job of presenting Dorothy Day's very adventurous life. He is very upfront about Dorothy's limitations and mistakes which is commendable considering his official role in promoting her for sainthood. I found "All is Grace" to be far more readable and satisfying than Ms. Day's own recount of her life in "The Long Loneliness." By the end of Forest's book, I was burn I noticed an earlier Goodreads reader review that called this book "dry." I can't believe we read the same book. Forest does a terrific job of presenting Dorothy Day's very adventurous life. He is very upfront about Dorothy's limitations and mistakes which is commendable considering his official role in promoting her for sainthood. I found "All is Grace" to be far more readable and satisfying than Ms. Day's own recount of her life in "The Long Loneliness." By the end of Forest's book, I was burning with curiosity to find out what had become of the Catholic Worker since Ms. Day's death -- it's not easy to find that information, by the way. Thank God for Dorothy Day. I hope that the current regime in Rome lifts her up as an example of fidelity to Christ, as they should.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Bashaar

    This biography of the great Dorothy Day was too dry for my liking. I've been spoiled by wonderful, novelistic biographies like the McCullough biography of John Adams. This book was really just a list of what Day did, with a lot of pictures. I wanted scenes like in a novel. I wanted to know how she impacted individual people who were helped by her. I wanted to know more about her grandchildren. I wanted to know more about what has become of the Catholic Worker movement. I was left with greater ad This biography of the great Dorothy Day was too dry for my liking. I've been spoiled by wonderful, novelistic biographies like the McCullough biography of John Adams. This book was really just a list of what Day did, with a lot of pictures. I wanted scenes like in a novel. I wanted to know how she impacted individual people who were helped by her. I wanted to know more about her grandchildren. I wanted to know more about what has become of the Catholic Worker movement. I was left with greater admiration for Day, but not as much insight into her or her movement as I wanted. Like my reviews? Check out my blog at http://www.kathrynbashaar.com/blog/

  3. 5 out of 5

    P.J. Sullivan

    An excellent introduction to Dorothy Day. Better than her autobiography for three reasons: 1) It covers her entire life, not just her early years. 2) It covers all aspects of her life, not just her religious conversion. 3) It draws on all her writings, public and private, including her recently-released diaries. It is detailed without being boring, personal without being biased. For those already familiar with her, this is an excellent recap. It clarifies things and fills in the gaps nicely. Year An excellent introduction to Dorothy Day. Better than her autobiography for three reasons: 1) It covers her entire life, not just her early years. 2) It covers all aspects of her life, not just her religious conversion. 3) It draws on all her writings, public and private, including her recently-released diaries. It is detailed without being boring, personal without being biased. For those already familiar with her, this is an excellent recap. It clarifies things and fills in the gaps nicely. Years of research went into this book; I don’t see any obvious factual errors. Having known Dorothy Day, I can attest to the accuracy of this book. Should she be canonized a saint? I don’t know why not. See the discussion in this book. More than a biography, this is also a history of the Catholic Worker movement within the larger contexts of American and world histories. Well written, clear and easy to follow, though its page layout is not easy on the eyes. (The text is squeezed into narrow columns to accommodate oversized margins that are mostly wasted space. What were they thinking? But it is readable.) Other than its page layout, this is a great book! An engrossing story of an eventful life. Recommended to anyone who would like to get to know Dorothy Day and walk a mile in her shoes. The illustrations, mostly photographs, are many and outstanding.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    This is a book dense with information and it provoked a lot of reflection for me on how to live the best life. It also helped me understand a woman I was only generally familiar with before page 1. There is so much to process now that I have finished the book: how simplifying one's life could lead to peace and joy, how small actions can change the world, how even remarkable people like Dorothy suffer loneliness, rejection, doubt, vanity, spite, pettiness, and pain, that we need to be vigilant to This is a book dense with information and it provoked a lot of reflection for me on how to live the best life. It also helped me understand a woman I was only generally familiar with before page 1. There is so much to process now that I have finished the book: how simplifying one's life could lead to peace and joy, how small actions can change the world, how even remarkable people like Dorothy suffer loneliness, rejection, doubt, vanity, spite, pettiness, and pain, that we need to be vigilant to see God appearing before us in the most desperate and disadvantaged people, that the coat in your closet for a year belongs to the poor, how to distinguish between your faith and your patriotism, and quite a bit more. It was fascinating also to see her life intersect with Eugene O'Neil, Mother Theresa, Cesar Chavez, as well as lesser known but inspiring figures like Ammon Hennacy, Peter Maurin, and Lionel Moise. Reading this book has been a project -- but I feel like I gained a great deal from the time invested in reading it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

    Dorothy Day is a person I have long admired. She lived her faith without compromise and she had a deep commitment to serving the poor, to non-violent protest, and to promoting peace. ALL IS GRACE, Jim Forest's detailed biography of Dorothy, is full of photographs, quotations from Dorothy and others, and graphics related to The Catholic Worker, of which Dorothy was co-founder and editor for decades. Many of these appear in the wide margins of the book, breaking the flow of reading, and some are r Dorothy Day is a person I have long admired. She lived her faith without compromise and she had a deep commitment to serving the poor, to non-violent protest, and to promoting peace. ALL IS GRACE, Jim Forest's detailed biography of Dorothy, is full of photographs, quotations from Dorothy and others, and graphics related to The Catholic Worker, of which Dorothy was co-founder and editor for decades. Many of these appear in the wide margins of the book, breaking the flow of reading, and some are repetitious of material in the main text. This makes the book slow going (I spent more than a month reading it) but it is not a book meant to be consumed in big gulps. Taking time to look at the photos and learn about the people who shared Dorothy's life and work turned out to be rewarding. I even went to outside sources to learn about those like Ade Bethune, the young artist who designed the masthead (and later the revised masthead) for The Catholic Worker and whose linocuts set the graphic style for the newspaper, and Peter Maurin, the French former Christian Brother who co-founded the Catholic Worker with Dorothy and, like her, stayed with the movement for the rest of his life. But the main story here is Dorothy's and how she struggled each day to follow the teachings of Jesus. Before her conversion to Catholicism, she had led something of a wild life, but politically she had leaned left and her heart had been with the working people and the poor. She was involved in the labor movement and was friends with socialists and communists. After her conversion, she did not reject any of these people, but set about opening Catholic Worker houses to feed, clothe, and shelter the poor with the same commitment she had had previously. She did this from the Depression onwards until 1980 when she died. She supported conscientious objectors in World War I (and was instrumental in getting that status established), World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. She was arrested several times for refusing to participate in civil defense drills and on one occasion spent a month in jail. Dorothy spent time traveling to Catholic Worker houses around the country, speaking about the need to serve the poor. She was a persuasive talker and many people joined Catholic Worker houses after hearing her. Many young people in particular came to the New York houses. She traveled internationally to speak for peace and for church reforms. She had no money of her own and could travel only when funds were made available through the church or privately, but she seemed always on the go, traveling by bus or ship. One of Dorothy's biggest influences was as editor and writer for The Catholic Worker. She commented on religious, social, and political matters in editorials and in her own column "On Pilgrimage," where she wrote about her own experiences in daily life. She wrote books about extended portions of her life: The Long Loneliness and From Union Square to Rome. She wrote a biography of St. Therese of Lisieux and a history of the Catholic Worker movement called Loaves and Fishes. She was an occasional contributor to Commonweal magazine, she wrote hundreds of letters, and kept daily diaries and journals. But putting all that aside, this is a story of faith, a faith that sustained a strong woman through times of physical and emotional hardship. Dorothy went to mass daily and took communion daily, she spent considerable time praying, and she constantly took herself to task for her shortcomings. She wanted to act and think with the patience and love that Jesus showed. Her life is the story of that worthy journey. If anyone ever came close, it was Dorothy Day.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Hayes

    A couple of years ago I read Love is the measure by Jim Forest, the biography of Dorothy Day, founder of the Catholic Worker movement, and I wrote a review of it, which I posted on my blog, here. All is grace is a revised and updated version of Love is the measure, based on more sources, including Dorothy Day's letters and diaries. I have little to add to my original review, other than to say that this one is bigger and better and even more worth reading. Dorothy Day, and anarchist, pacifist and A couple of years ago I read Love is the measure by Jim Forest, the biography of Dorothy Day, founder of the Catholic Worker movement, and I wrote a review of it, which I posted on my blog, here. All is grace is a revised and updated version of Love is the measure, based on more sources, including Dorothy Day's letters and diaries. I have little to add to my original review, other than to say that this one is bigger and better and even more worth reading. Dorothy Day, and anarchist, pacifist and communitarian, was one of the outstanding Christians of the 20th century and in 1998 the process of having her declared a saint in the Roman Catholic Church was started. Jim Forest was himself a member of the Catholic Worker community in the 1960s, and editor of the Catholic Worker paper, and is now the bosser-up of the Orthodox Peace Fellowship. If you would like to know more about it, please check my original review of Love is the measure.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Luke Hillier

    More of a 3.5 than a 4 star, and for a lot of the reading I expected to want to give it a solid 3. The first 100 pages, which cover Dorothy's life prior to the Catholic Worker, were pretty uninteresting to me, and repetitive as well. Much like her life, however, once the Catholic Worker comes together, the book picks up steam and in my opinion gets better as it goes, in part because we have a growing familiarity with Dorothy that is quite nuanced by the end. Some unique elements were the coverag More of a 3.5 than a 4 star, and for a lot of the reading I expected to want to give it a solid 3. The first 100 pages, which cover Dorothy's life prior to the Catholic Worker, were pretty uninteresting to me, and repetitive as well. Much like her life, however, once the Catholic Worker comes together, the book picks up steam and in my opinion gets better as it goes, in part because we have a growing familiarity with Dorothy that is quite nuanced by the end. Some unique elements were the coverage of history as if through the eyes of Dorothy. Obviously her life was inextricable from the times she lived in and railed against, and I think Forest did an exceptional job of showing the intertwined nature of her experiences with what was happening on a national and global scale. Although I personally would have enjoyed a little more projection and analysis from the biographer (as was the case in Wounded Prophet: A Portrait of Henri J.M. Nouwen), I know that's not the norm or even desired by many readers and think this is still an excellent example of a largely unbiased, clear-cut biography of an incredible and inspiring woman. I found myself moved and impacted by the figure presented of Dorothy throughout and especially by the end of my reading, and while at times it felt tedious, repetitive, and a bit over-detailed, I am thankful to have read it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Antosh

    I very much enjoyed this book. My favorite part was the chapters on the Catholic Workers movement's active involvement in labour struggles, particularly the striking workers on the waterfront and the role Catholicism played in the United Farm Workers strikes/boycotts. I think people often see the Catholic Worker Movement as well meaning Christians who fed the poor and had farming communes, but in the end it's great to read that they had a systemic critique of the social and political system and I very much enjoyed this book. My favorite part was the chapters on the Catholic Workers movement's active involvement in labour struggles, particularly the striking workers on the waterfront and the role Catholicism played in the United Farm Workers strikes/boycotts. I think people often see the Catholic Worker Movement as well meaning Christians who fed the poor and had farming communes, but in the end it's great to read that they had a systemic critique of the social and political system and actively entered into the social struggle. I would suggest this book for those religious FWs on how to orientate themselves to radical activism.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Comprehensive book about an amazing woman. An avid traveler from a young age (born in 1897), Dorothy led a surprisingly bohemian life until converting to Catholicism at age 30, following the birth of her illegitimate daughter. The book details her action to oppose hunger & homelessness during the Great Depression, military involvement in WWII, communist persecution during the Red Scare, abuse of Hispanic farm laborers in CA, nuclear proliferation, war in Vietnam, segregation and racism during th Comprehensive book about an amazing woman. An avid traveler from a young age (born in 1897), Dorothy led a surprisingly bohemian life until converting to Catholicism at age 30, following the birth of her illegitimate daughter. The book details her action to oppose hunger & homelessness during the Great Depression, military involvement in WWII, communist persecution during the Red Scare, abuse of Hispanic farm laborers in CA, nuclear proliferation, war in Vietnam, segregation and racism during the Civil Rights movement, [insert any progressive movement in the last 100 years here]. It's hard to believe that she was truly on the right side of history at each of these pivotal junctures, but perhaps that's what happens when you have an exacting personal commitment to what Dorothy called the "works of mercy." From the beginning Dorothy is an empathetic and emotional soul, and the extent to which she personally feeds the hungry, tends to the sick, houses the homeless and constantly challenges herself to see the best in everyone is inspiring. Her letters and journals document her struggle to live up to her ideals and exhaustion she experiences leading the Catholic Worker; this writing is critical to seeing Dorothy how she would have wanted to be remembered: not a superhuman person, but a flawed individual with superhuman will to constantly improve herself for the sake of serving others and God. The Appendix also presents the current campaign for her sainthood in an interesting light; why not have a saint that demonstrates that ordinary sinners are called to be (and can be) holy? Understandable that Pope Francis chose Dorothy as one of the four Americans he honored in his speech to Congress during his visit to the U.S. While Dorothy herself is definitely a 5, I gave the book a 3 because it seemed longer than it needed to be. Halfway through, the book seemed focused more on cataloging all of Dorothy's good deeds than tracking her personal development, a loss because she was such a prolific writer and journaler. It would have been interesting to read more about her struggles with depression, her relationship with her family, and others' impressions of her as leader of the Catholic Worker movement, personal friend, and grandmother/great-grandmother.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Pollard-Gott

    If you are not acquainted with the life of Dorothy Day (1897-1980), this book is a wonderful introduction, rich in quotations from her writings to give a true picture of her evolution of thought, faith, and work. She emerges as real and imperfect, exemplary and inspiring: as an American, as a Christian, as a human. She entitled her autobiography "The Long Loneliness" so she did not purvey illusions about the sacrifices entailed in her call to serve the poor as one of them. One person said of her If you are not acquainted with the life of Dorothy Day (1897-1980), this book is a wonderful introduction, rich in quotations from her writings to give a true picture of her evolution of thought, faith, and work. She emerges as real and imperfect, exemplary and inspiring: as an American, as a Christian, as a human. She entitled her autobiography "The Long Loneliness" so she did not purvey illusions about the sacrifices entailed in her call to serve the poor as one of them. One person said of her after her death, "She lived as though the truth were actually true."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charles Wilson

    All I knew about Dorothy Day before reading this book is that Pope Francis had mentioned her along with Thomas Merton as a pivotal religious figure in the American 20th century. Now that I know her better, I can see why they want her to be sainted. This woman deliberately chose to live a life of poverty alongside the needy and fought relentlessly for the underdog in the name of Christ. We should all be so dedicated. The book embarrassed me that I don't do more in the way of social justice and sh All I knew about Dorothy Day before reading this book is that Pope Francis had mentioned her along with Thomas Merton as a pivotal religious figure in the American 20th century. Now that I know her better, I can see why they want her to be sainted. This woman deliberately chose to live a life of poverty alongside the needy and fought relentlessly for the underdog in the name of Christ. We should all be so dedicated. The book embarrassed me that I don't do more in the way of social justice and showed how working for social justice is doing Christ's work on earth. It made me want to do more.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    This is a wonderful book that would appeal to anyone interested in 20th century history, women's history, sainthood, social justice, the labor and peace movements. It is the biography of an extraordinary woman who grew up poor and spent her life in service to people in poverty. At times, it felt Like a who's who of American history in terms of the people Day encountered during her journey. Written in a simple and deeply compelling style - kind of like Day herself! I'm only wondering why the auth This is a wonderful book that would appeal to anyone interested in 20th century history, women's history, sainthood, social justice, the labor and peace movements. It is the biography of an extraordinary woman who grew up poor and spent her life in service to people in poverty. At times, it felt Like a who's who of American history in terms of the people Day encountered during her journey. Written in a simple and deeply compelling style - kind of like Day herself! I'm only wondering why the author omitted mention of her 25 year vocation as a secular Benedictine oblate.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    As a former Catholic worker, I was very interested to hear about this book. I did not read the previous versions of this book which is fine since this version contains many previously unpublished excerpts from Dorothy's writings. It also contains many lovely photographs. My only quibbles with the book is that the page layout could be better. Also, an important work such as this should be in hardback. As a former Catholic worker, I was very interested to hear about this book. I did not read the previous versions of this book which is fine since this version contains many previously unpublished excerpts from Dorothy's writings. It also contains many lovely photographs. My only quibbles with the book is that the page layout could be better. Also, an important work such as this should be in hardback.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Dorothy Day was a very interesting paradox of values and commitments during a strange, old-fashioned time in the Catholic Church, Basically a communist (small "c") unwed Mother with no real visible means of support who really did give the poor a helping hand. The writing style is somewhat choppy. It feels like Jim Forest sat down with a yellow legal pad and wrote a section at a time in freestyle. I did mot really like the book that much but I am glad I know more about this amazing woman. Dorothy Day was a very interesting paradox of values and commitments during a strange, old-fashioned time in the Catholic Church, Basically a communist (small "c") unwed Mother with no real visible means of support who really did give the poor a helping hand. The writing style is somewhat choppy. It feels like Jim Forest sat down with a yellow legal pad and wrote a section at a time in freestyle. I did mot really like the book that much but I am glad I know more about this amazing woman.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Whitney Stohr

    An excellent biography about a remarkable woman, an American woman who lived in our own time. It is always refreshing to read about women, especially lay women, who have contributed so much to the church and society. Whatever our religious or spiritual preferences, her lifetime work and legacy is an example for us all.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Trishulananda Paul McMullen

    Great book, very thoughtfully composed, giving an insight into the social conditions and the political climate of the period between the two world wars and up to Dorothy's death in 1980. Also contains many inspirational quotations and accounts to whet the appetite of those in search of a path to Social Justice. Great book, very thoughtfully composed, giving an insight into the social conditions and the political climate of the period between the two world wars and up to Dorothy's death in 1980. Also contains many inspirational quotations and accounts to whet the appetite of those in search of a path to Social Justice.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I am really enjoying this. I had a long weekend at the beach to begin it, and I'm so glad I did! It is full of beautiful pictures and very interesting history about what made Dorothy Day tick, and what went into the making of this radical woman. I am really enjoying this. I had a long weekend at the beach to begin it, and I'm so glad I did! It is full of beautiful pictures and very interesting history about what made Dorothy Day tick, and what went into the making of this radical woman.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Riley

    There has long seemed to be a battle between the conservative Catholic church and its social justice side. Dorothy Day very much on the later wing, spending most of her life helping the destitute. I have zero religious feeling myself, but her example still is a powerful one.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lee F.

    Certainly made me think.....

  20. 5 out of 5

    Judith Guyot

    This is certainly a comprehensive book. Not a detail of her remarkable life left out. It's worth the wade through. This is certainly a comprehensive book. Not a detail of her remarkable life left out. It's worth the wade through.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    An incredible read! I could not put it down. Weather you are Catholic or not, you will find this woman's life inspiring! An incredible read! I could not put it down. Weather you are Catholic or not, you will find this woman's life inspiring!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    The best biography of Dorothy Day I have read. The photos are very good.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Wonderful biography of a wonderful woman. Lavishly illustrated throughout. This would serve as good introduction to Dorothy Day for those wanting to know about her.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Therese

    So glad I read this...a very well rounded portrayal of an amazing life.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kylie Martens

    I have always loved the original version of this book. It was so good to read it again and to enjoy the extra photos and excerpts from Dorothy's diaries as well. Inspiring and fascinating. I have always loved the original version of this book. It was so good to read it again and to enjoy the extra photos and excerpts from Dorothy's diaries as well. Inspiring and fascinating.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Georgiana

    "She lived as though the truth were actually true." "She lived as though the truth were actually true."

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daan Savert

    “Don’t call me a saint. I don’t want to be dismissed that easily." - Dorothy Day Deeply inspired by this woman! “Don’t call me a saint. I don’t want to be dismissed that easily." - Dorothy Day Deeply inspired by this woman!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ana Carvalho

    I discovered a singular and unique saint of the 20th century, the history of an unlikely saint who put her love for God above all things and through her entire life was guided by that love, taking decisions that can only be understood under this light. This history of a catholic labor activist and history of the 20th century in America. The history of someone who went to Mass everyday of her life and had communion until the last day but created troubles with authorities, police, priests and was I discovered a singular and unique saint of the 20th century, the history of an unlikely saint who put her love for God above all things and through her entire life was guided by that love, taking decisions that can only be understood under this light. This history of a catholic labor activist and history of the 20th century in America. The history of someone who went to Mass everyday of her life and had communion until the last day but created troubles with authorities, police, priests and was arrested several times. This is a great biography with many quotes from Dorothy Day books.

  29. 4 out of 5

    James Lang

    Inspiring account of an incredible woman. A basic biographical overview with lots of pictures of Day from various points in her life. Forest worked with her at the Catholic Worker house in New York and the book concludes with his personal reminisces about his time with her--including the time when she asked him to leave in a fit of pique (they later reconciled). A great introduction to the life and work of a modern saint.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    A loving, simply and beautifully written bio by a member of the Catholic Workers who knew and worked with Dorothy Day (and who suffered her temper). Just the thing for anyone who, like me, has been fascinated by DD since their Catholic childhood. Also for anyone interested in the history of the contemporary U.S. left.

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