counter create hit Compendium: Catechism of the Catholic Church - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Compendium: Catechism of the Catholic Church

Availability: Ready to download

Pope Benedict XVI gives the Church the "food" that it seeks in the 598 questions and answers comprising the official summary of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Because of the book's format, parents, pastors, teachers, principals, and catechists have a unique opportunity to dialogue with the faithful, and reinvigorate the Church's ongoing mission of evangelization and Pope Benedict XVI gives the Church the "food" that it seeks in the 598 questions and answers comprising the official summary of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Because of the book's format, parents, pastors, teachers, principals, and catechists have a unique opportunity to dialogue with the faithful, and reinvigorate the Church's ongoing mission of evangelization and catechesis. USCC


Compare

Pope Benedict XVI gives the Church the "food" that it seeks in the 598 questions and answers comprising the official summary of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Because of the book's format, parents, pastors, teachers, principals, and catechists have a unique opportunity to dialogue with the faithful, and reinvigorate the Church's ongoing mission of evangelization and Pope Benedict XVI gives the Church the "food" that it seeks in the 598 questions and answers comprising the official summary of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Because of the book's format, parents, pastors, teachers, principals, and catechists have a unique opportunity to dialogue with the faithful, and reinvigorate the Church's ongoing mission of evangelization and catechesis. USCC

30 review for Compendium: Catechism of the Catholic Church

  1. 4 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    If you are a Catholic and you want to know your church better, go for this book. This is a compendium and prior to reading this book I did not know what the word meant. A compendium according to the dictionary is a collection of concise but detailed information about a particular subject, esp. in a book or other publication. So, there is a thicker and more comprehensive Guide to the Cathechism of the Catholic Church for those who want to dig deeper. This is not a summary or an abridged but a com If you are a Catholic and you want to know your church better, go for this book. This is a compendium and prior to reading this book I did not know what the word meant. A compendium according to the dictionary is a collection of concise but detailed information about a particular subject, esp. in a book or other publication. So, there is a thicker and more comprehensive Guide to the Cathechism of the Catholic Church for those who want to dig deeper. This is not a summary or an abridged but a compendium that hopefully will make you interested to read the thicker catechism. But if you feel that reading a thick book about religion is daunting, start with this one. The format is Q & A and since I have been reading many other Catholic books and since I have been a practicing Catholic since the day I first came to church with my mom (40+ years ago), some of them are already familiar to me. So, what I did, I read the question first and if I knew the answer, I just browsed and saw if there was something that I could still ponder on. Most of the time, none so that made my reading faster. However, there were those familiar questions that I felt I knew the answer but it was also nice to be reminded and appreciated how the answer has grown into me since I was a kid. So, overall it was a positive learning or re-learning experience through reading. Let me share to you those that I had to read carefully because these were the re-learning answers for me: 117. Who is responsible for the death of Jesus? The passion and death of Jesus cannot be imputed indiscriminately either to all Jews that were living at that time or to their descendants. Every single sinner, that is, every human being is really the cause and the instrument of the sufferings of the Redeemer; and the greater blame in this respect falls on those above all who are Christians and who the more often fell into sin or delight in their vices.Why is this a re-learning for me: I am more to be blamed than the Jews during that time.395. When does one commit a mortal sin? One commits a mortal sin when there are simultaneously present: grave matter, full knowledge, and deliberate consent. This sin destroys charity in us, deprives us of sanctifying grace, and, if unrepented, leads us to the eternal death of hell. It can be forgiven in the ordinary way by means of the sacraments of Baptism and of Penance and of Reconciliation.Why is this a re-learning for me:I thought that mortal sins were those against the 10 commandments.396. When does one commit a venial sin? One commits a venial sin, which is essentially different from a mortal sin, when the matter involved is less serious or, even if it is grave, when full knowledge or complete consent are absent. Venial sin does not break the covenant with God but is weakens charity and manifests a disordered affection for created goods. It impedes the progress of a soul in the exercise of the virtues and in the practice of moral good. It merits temporary punishment which purifies.Why is this a re-learning for me:I thought that all sins that were not mortal were automatically venial. Those that were not part of the 10 commandments including sins of omission.398. What are vices? Vices are the opposite of virtues. They are perverse habits which darken the conscience and incline one to evil. The vices can be linked to the seven, so called, capital sins which are pride, avarice, envy, anger, lust, gluttony, and sloth or acedia.Why is this a re-learning for me: I have a friend who loves to drink alcohol and he is saying that he is not sinning by drinking. He is correct but he is the only one who can tell if his drinking does not lead him into any of the capital sins. What I know is that sometimes he has hangover and int he morning he feels lazy (slothful) to go to the church to attend the Sunday mass. There are many other questions that are nice to know particularly about the Catholic church's stand on arms struggle and work. I also enjoyed reading the Formulas of Catholic Doctrine at the end part of the book, particularly: The three theological virtues: 1. Faith 2. Hope 3. Charity The four cardinal virtues: 1. Prudence 2. Justice 3. Fortitude 4. Temperance The five precepts of the Church: 1. You shall attend Mass on Sundays and on holy days of obligation and remain free from work or activity that could impede the sanctification of such days. Goodreads on Sunday if it makes me lazy to go to the Church? 2. You shall confess your sins at least once a year. My last confession was just last month so my next will be next year. 3. You shall receive the sacrament of the Eucharist at least during the Easter Season. If this meant communion, then I am taking it almost every Sunday! 4. You shall observe the days of fasting and abstinence established by the Church. I do but I will be more serious this year! 5. You shall help to provide for the needs of the Church. I should be more serious about this as well. Nice read. It anchors your faith really by knowing or by being reminded of what you have to believe as a practicing Catholic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    I got this when it came out, flipped through it, and then put it on the shelf, where the poor thing was never moved until I gave an explanatory talk last night to the RCIA class about how to navigate your way around the Catechism (and other related topics such as Imprimatur stamps, etc.) When I was looking through it this morning to attempt to answer a question (this group is sharp and curious, although I TOLD them I wasn't an expert on the Catechism, but was good at navigating the numbering syst I got this when it came out, flipped through it, and then put it on the shelf, where the poor thing was never moved until I gave an explanatory talk last night to the RCIA class about how to navigate your way around the Catechism (and other related topics such as Imprimatur stamps, etc.) When I was looking through it this morning to attempt to answer a question (this group is sharp and curious, although I TOLD them I wasn't an expert on the Catechism, but was good at navigating the numbering system) ... anyway, so I was looking for specific info and realized I'd never given this a proper read. The Q&A structure originally put me off, although now that I read the introduction I see it is meant to reflect an ancient style, to "reflect an imaginary dialogue between master and disciple ... that invite the reader to go deeper in discovering ever new aspects of his faith." And now that I've had more experience with having to answer the unpredictable questions that RCIA attendees ask, I can appreciate the format more. Also, it is intentionally kept brief, intending to spark interest in digging deeper in the actual Catechism. Digging deeper I saw there are some very good features I never noticed. For example, although it has some absolutely gorgeous art, I never noticed that each illustration is accompanied by a thorough explanation, whether it be of the symbolism, related commentary, Church Fathers' meditations, prayers, or a combination thereof. Not only do these invite further reflection, they serve as examples of how to "read" devotional art. Also, there's a nice appendix of common prayers. I believe I'll be reading this along with my daily Catechism pages.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Yee

    Finished reading this book together with Evangelium Participants’ Book . This book can be challenging to read but it's a great reference book. I feel it’s more like a pocket dictionary for me. A comprehensive guide on Catholic doctrinal teachings which can be used to clear my doubts or confusion for certain subjects. Finished reading this book together with Evangelium Participants’ Book . This book can be challenging to read but it's a great reference book. I feel it’s more like a pocket dictionary for me. A comprehensive guide on Catholic doctrinal teachings which can be used to clear my doubts or confusion for certain subjects.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Karina

    This little book costs more than the actual Catechism that it's meant to summarize. But I have the Catechism and it's a little daunting, whereas this looks manageable, and I like the question-answer format and all the nice color illustrations, haha. This is good. I know that it's brief, and I still have questions about certain questions, but like I said, it's more manageable reading it in this shorter format, and I enjoy the illustrations, and the explanations of the symbolic meaning of these il This little book costs more than the actual Catechism that it's meant to summarize. But I have the Catechism and it's a little daunting, whereas this looks manageable, and I like the question-answer format and all the nice color illustrations, haha. This is good. I know that it's brief, and I still have questions about certain questions, but like I said, it's more manageable reading it in this shorter format, and I enjoy the illustrations, and the explanations of the symbolic meaning of these illustrations are fantastic. Question 58 "Why does God permit evil?" isn't answered fully, because I know that there is more to it, having to do with the freedom of will. I guess I'll try to look up the full Catechism in a bit. This in the Question 87 struck me as highly significant: "He [Jesus] was made true man, our brother, without ceasing to be God, our Lord." Sometimes, it's good to be reminded of the familial relation, and sometimes I can take this fact that Jesus is our brother rather for granted and forget the other part. Question 90 says that the Son of God "knew fully the eternal plans which he had come to reveal". Right, except that if I recall correctly even the Son of Man doesn't know the hour of the end times. And also here I had a question if He knew he'd rise from the dead; and then duh! of course.

  5. 5 out of 5

    D

    Interesting to see how progressive the Church is with interpreting the 7th Commandment - Thou Shalt Not Steal. Includes not using too much of our natural resources. Looking forward to the revision for the 21 century regarding the 6th Commandment, particularly for our LGBT community, birth control, and just generally a sex-positive approach to life. Reminder of the 7 Capital Sins 1. Price 2. Covetousness 3. Lust 4. Anger 5. Gluttony 6. Envy 7. Sloth 7 Corporal Works of Mercy 1. Feed the hungry 2. Give drin Interesting to see how progressive the Church is with interpreting the 7th Commandment - Thou Shalt Not Steal. Includes not using too much of our natural resources. Looking forward to the revision for the 21 century regarding the 6th Commandment, particularly for our LGBT community, birth control, and just generally a sex-positive approach to life. Reminder of the 7 Capital Sins 1. Price 2. Covetousness 3. Lust 4. Anger 5. Gluttony 6. Envy 7. Sloth 7 Corporal Works of Mercy 1. Feed the hungry 2. Give drink to the thirsty 3. Clothe the naked 4. Shelter the homeless 5. Visit the sick 6. Visit the imprisoned 7. Bury the dead. 7 Spiritual Works of Mercy 1. Counsel the doubtful 2. Instruct the ignorant 3. Admonish sinners 4. Comfort the afflicted 5. Forgive offenses 6. Bear wrongs patiently 7. Pray for the living and the dead.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ms. B

    This is the one my husband and I read for our Understanding the Catholic Faith class (aka RCIA). The question and answer format is easy to understand and it's much less daunting than the unabridged version. This is the one my husband and I read for our Understanding the Catholic Faith class (aka RCIA). The question and answer format is easy to understand and it's much less daunting than the unabridged version.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Stahl

    A comprehensive guide on Christian faith and teachings. Both challenging and enriching. Something any self-respecting Christian ought to have on their shelf.

  8. 5 out of 5

    JhonyHandsome596

    This article is pretty much fantastic.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mare

    A good resource for the meaning an definitions of the many aspects of the Catholic Church. It is a supplement of the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

    I love learning the tidbits of my faith.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rick Lilla

    A superb summation in question and answer format of the much larger Catechism of the Catholic Church.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Željko Filipin

    A summary of catholic catechism. Not an easy read at all.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    An awesome little book that I left unread for much too long! ;) I received the book in 2008, during the World Youth Days is Sydney and since then it has been laying around in my room. I'm glad I read it now! Although it is a little tough to read sometimes, I love how it is divided in topics and works with questions. Information is clear and to the point. For everyone who wants to know the Catholic faith of the church this book is an absolute must-read! ;) Also, as I was raised a Christian, I alrea An awesome little book that I left unread for much too long! ;) I received the book in 2008, during the World Youth Days is Sydney and since then it has been laying around in my room. I'm glad I read it now! Although it is a little tough to read sometimes, I love how it is divided in topics and works with questions. Information is clear and to the point. For everyone who wants to know the Catholic faith of the church this book is an absolute must-read! ;) Also, as I was raised a Christian, I already know about a lot of things, but this book provided affirmation and added depth to some of my visions. I recommend reading this book! ;D

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul Lee

    Good for specific questions and for those that are new to the church. Organized well. Wasn't quite what I was expecting. A whole book of Q&A format was a little much and the questions are laid out in an ok order. The table of contents could be better and I think that would help people find what they are looking for more easily. Good for specific questions and for those that are new to the church. Organized well. Wasn't quite what I was expecting. A whole book of Q&A format was a little much and the questions are laid out in an ok order. The table of contents could be better and I think that would help people find what they are looking for more easily.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gil Michelini

    This is an excellent resource for those serious about studying our faith, which is outlined in the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC). Written in the catechetical question/answer format, this book is a guide to the major topics found in the CCC. If you have a goal of someday reading the CCC, the Compendium would be helpful is achieving that goal.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Becki

    This is a very brief overview of the Catholic Catechism. I only recommend it for quick reference. It is not for a new Catholic because is not as detailed as the Catechism. I would not use it as a substitute for the Catechism. It does Biblically back up all beliefs of the church and Magesterium.

  17. 4 out of 5

    David S. T.

    I read this right now because I don't have time to read the complete Catechism, while incomplete this does serve its purpose and provides a quick rundown of many fundamental topics of the Catechism with numbers to cross reference it. I read this right now because I don't have time to read the complete Catechism, while incomplete this does serve its purpose and provides a quick rundown of many fundamental topics of the Catechism with numbers to cross reference it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    LH

    I got issues with these teachings/practices. Not all of them, but a bunch of them. In light of the gay pedophiles and other sexual abusers and cover-ups at very high levels of the Catholic church, these teachings are BS.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Zachary

    The Compendium is very user-friendly thanks to its question-answer format, and it gives good, concise answers that can be the jump-off point to further study on almost any doctrinal issue in the Church.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    This is the book that was used in my RCIA class to teach the Catholic faith. It's in question/answer format. I wish that it gave more biblical references. It wasn't always easy to understand. I much preferred "A Catechism For Adults" by Rev. William Cogan. This is the book that was used in my RCIA class to teach the Catholic faith. It's in question/answer format. I wish that it gave more biblical references. It wasn't always easy to understand. I much preferred "A Catechism For Adults" by Rev. William Cogan.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    This is a synopsis of the Catholic catechism that has been approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. The fundamental lessons and teachings of the Catholic Church are covered and it is an excellent introduction to Catholicism.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Tuck

    The compendium is invaluable for rebutting the quaint misconceptions many of our separated brethren seem to hold about Catholicism. more substantially though it is something of a 'how to' for applying the Word of God in daily life. The compendium is invaluable for rebutting the quaint misconceptions many of our separated brethren seem to hold about Catholicism. more substantially though it is something of a 'how to' for applying the Word of God in daily life.

  23. 5 out of 5

    1catholicsalmon

    A shorter version of the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gino

    a summary of the CCC in Q&A format.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Guille Heff

    I think if you have any doubts or questions regarding your faith this is kinda like a textbook, it should stay on your bedside table so you can consult anytime.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie Scheirman

    This isn't really the type of book you like or don't like, but it was informative to anyone who has questions about their Catholic Religion. Appreciated the information. This isn't really the type of book you like or don't like, but it was informative to anyone who has questions about their Catholic Religion. Appreciated the information.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Valentin

    A great follow up book for every catholic.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Greg Reed

    Good reference to use when looking for quick answers about Catholic doctrine. Very helpful to use when doing a study of the Catechism of the Catholic church.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Derrick Gibson

    A bit easier to read than the full version of the Catholic Catechism of the Catholic Church and really useful, especially if you are pressed for time.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    An excellent review of he Roman Catholic faith. It's question and answer format are similar to the classic Baltimore Catechism. An excellent review of he Roman Catholic faith. It's question and answer format are similar to the classic Baltimore Catechism.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.