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Cyberspaces of Their Own: Female Fandoms Online

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Cyberspaces of Their Own interrogates the social and spatial relations of the rapidly expanding virtual terrain of media fandom. For the first time, issues of identity, community and space are brought together in this in-depth ethnographic study of two female internet communities. Members are fans of the American television series The X-Files and the Canadian series Due So Cyberspaces of Their Own interrogates the social and spatial relations of the rapidly expanding virtual terrain of media fandom. For the first time, issues of identity, community and space are brought together in this in-depth ethnographic study of two female internet communities. Members are fans of the American television series The X-Files and the Canadian series Due South. Forging links between media, cultural and internet studies, this book examines negotiations of gender, class, sexuality and nationality in making meaning out of a television show, producing fiction based on television characters, creating and maintaining online communal relations, and organizing cyberspace in a way that marks it out as alternative to that which surrounds it.


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Cyberspaces of Their Own interrogates the social and spatial relations of the rapidly expanding virtual terrain of media fandom. For the first time, issues of identity, community and space are brought together in this in-depth ethnographic study of two female internet communities. Members are fans of the American television series The X-Files and the Canadian series Due So Cyberspaces of Their Own interrogates the social and spatial relations of the rapidly expanding virtual terrain of media fandom. For the first time, issues of identity, community and space are brought together in this in-depth ethnographic study of two female internet communities. Members are fans of the American television series The X-Files and the Canadian series Due South. Forging links between media, cultural and internet studies, this book examines negotiations of gender, class, sexuality and nationality in making meaning out of a television show, producing fiction based on television characters, creating and maintaining online communal relations, and organizing cyberspace in a way that marks it out as alternative to that which surrounds it.

47 review for Cyberspaces of Their Own: Female Fandoms Online

  1. 5 out of 5

    Karen-Leigh

    I should have researched this more before I bought it. Terribly disappointing beginning. Takes a very narrow section of fandom and then analyses it to pieces with highbrow bullshit. Keeps reinforcing that the women who are fans are university educated and therefore...it reads like a dissertation rather than something an actual fan who was there in the fandom from 1995 on many many lists but not the Estrogen Brigade. So much could have been done with this and wasn't. It reads like a tract. I neve I should have researched this more before I bought it. Terribly disappointing beginning. Takes a very narrow section of fandom and then analyses it to pieces with highbrow bullshit. Keeps reinforcing that the women who are fans are university educated and therefore...it reads like a dissertation rather than something an actual fan who was there in the fandom from 1995 on many many lists but not the Estrogen Brigade. So much could have been done with this and wasn't. It reads like a tract. I never heard of any of the women interviewed, it skimmed over things I wanted more information on and went on forever on crap that bored the bejesus out of me. Narrow focus did a disservice to female fandom in cyberspace from my point of view. Too busy trying to legitimize something that didn't need legitimizing. Of course, it was really about the ACTORS and not the characters. Focus was David Duchcovny Estrogen Brigade which right off the bat says we are following the actor and not the character...the character is interesting but incidental and isn't he gorgeous. My fandom was Mulder not Duchovny so this was really a mistaken purchase on my part. I am so disappointed and I had so looked forward to this book. I shall go back and read Textual Poachers and Enterprising Women to wash the taste of this mess out of my mind. Due South was never one of my fandoms but in discussing it and slash, the book actually mentioned the past and paper circuit but did NOT link paper circuits to the appropriate fandoms..WTF? History of fandom skimmed over like it was less than important. It got better as it got on but the hard slog of the beginning almost made me toss it. As I read on Chapter 2 got better but overall I wished for more/better...something. Chapter 3 took me back to list culture with grammar mavens policing everyone's emails and criticizing their fan fiction and just constantly bitching as if the fact that they were educated and knew the language gave them the right to lord it over everyone else. My ability was equal to theirs in every respect but they ruined fandom for me. The book continued to go up and down in my estimation but never quite satisfied.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I enjoyed the in-depth analysis of two communities for this book. It suffered a bit from being somewhat dated--it was published in 2006 but only mentions blogging and Livejournal at the very end. As someone who wrote her PhD. dissertation on fandom on USENET, I empathize greatly--and the insights into fannish behavior still hold quite true, especially in discussions about politeness versus "constructive criticism."

  3. 4 out of 5

    John Carter McKnight

    Excellent study of two women's fan communities on Usenet in the mid-90's. Terrific insights and observations, outstanding deployment of theory. My only gripe is that this was a 2005 book about 1996 research: in 1998 it would have blown the roof off the academy, while by 2005 it was merely a very good book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    My life. DDEB and Due South slash? Jesus I am a stereotype. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ellie Woods

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brygmi Jane

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ginger K

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shelley Diemart

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nara

  10. 5 out of 5

    Audra

  11. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kat

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jaala

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emma England

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cassey

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  17. 5 out of 5

    Martha

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gino Roncaglia

  19. 5 out of 5

    St├ęphanie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sara Strasser

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Taylor-Ashfield

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mamie Cox

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mervyn Peake

  24. 4 out of 5

    Akkisuitok

  25. 5 out of 5

    Beatrice Crowl

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jayne

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eve

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

  30. 4 out of 5

    k8inorbit

  31. 5 out of 5

    William Hanff

  32. 4 out of 5

    Cinco

  33. 5 out of 5

    avantine

  34. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Janssen

  35. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  36. 4 out of 5

    Laura Quilter

  37. 5 out of 5

    Slay Belle

  38. 5 out of 5

    Digitalmeowmix

  39. 5 out of 5

    Lord Beardsley

  40. 5 out of 5

    Jinjifore

  41. 4 out of 5

    Angela

  42. 4 out of 5

    K.

  43. 5 out of 5

    Cheveuxroux S.

  44. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

  45. 5 out of 5

    Peg

  46. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  47. 5 out of 5

    Ashlyn

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