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Ecojustice Education: Toward Diverse, Democratic, and Sustainable Communities

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"Authentic hope is the gift Rebecca Martusewicz, Jeff Edmundson, and John Lupinacci offer readers of EcoJustice Education . We learn what it means to recover the ancient arts and skills of cultivating commons, common sense, and community collaborations in our hard times." Madhu Suri Prakash, Pennsylvania State University "EcoJustice Education should become a core part of te "Authentic hope is the gift Rebecca Martusewicz, Jeff Edmundson, and John Lupinacci offer readers of EcoJustice Education . We learn what it means to recover the ancient arts and skills of cultivating commons, common sense, and community collaborations in our hard times." Madhu Suri Prakash, Pennsylvania State University "EcoJustice Education should become a core part of teacher education programs across the country as it provides both the theory and examples of classroom practices essential for making the transition to a sustainable future." C. A. Bowers, author, international speaker, and retired professor Designed for introductory social foundations or multicultural education courses, this text offers a powerful model for cultural ecological analysis and pedagogy of responsibility, providing teachers and teacher educators with the information and classroom practices they need to help develop citizens who are prepared to support and achieve diverse, democratic, and sustainable societies in an increasingly globalized world. The Companion Website for this book (www.routledge.com/textbooks/978041587...) offers a wealth of resources linked to each chapter."


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"Authentic hope is the gift Rebecca Martusewicz, Jeff Edmundson, and John Lupinacci offer readers of EcoJustice Education . We learn what it means to recover the ancient arts and skills of cultivating commons, common sense, and community collaborations in our hard times." Madhu Suri Prakash, Pennsylvania State University "EcoJustice Education should become a core part of te "Authentic hope is the gift Rebecca Martusewicz, Jeff Edmundson, and John Lupinacci offer readers of EcoJustice Education . We learn what it means to recover the ancient arts and skills of cultivating commons, common sense, and community collaborations in our hard times." Madhu Suri Prakash, Pennsylvania State University "EcoJustice Education should become a core part of teacher education programs across the country as it provides both the theory and examples of classroom practices essential for making the transition to a sustainable future." C. A. Bowers, author, international speaker, and retired professor Designed for introductory social foundations or multicultural education courses, this text offers a powerful model for cultural ecological analysis and pedagogy of responsibility, providing teachers and teacher educators with the information and classroom practices they need to help develop citizens who are prepared to support and achieve diverse, democratic, and sustainable societies in an increasingly globalized world. The Companion Website for this book (www.routledge.com/textbooks/978041587...) offers a wealth of resources linked to each chapter."

30 review for Ecojustice Education: Toward Diverse, Democratic, and Sustainable Communities

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kat Matisse

    I consider this a must read for any teacher that is oriented towards justice, equity, and the moral good. A fantastic and thorough perspective on how environmentalism, poverty, racism and educational inequity are intertwined. Very specific and helpful tools for educators as well. I recommend this to every educator I know.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Justin Zakoren

    In EcoJustice Education, the authors rightly identify the ongoing environmental crisis with a broad cultural crisis in society. Employing a "cultural ecological analysis" (read green critical socio-linguistics), this text attempts to examine the relationship between anthropomorphic global climate change and a variety of interrelated socio-cultural "isms". Yet, after establishing the need for such an interdisciplinary treatment of environmental and social justice, the authors devote much of the b In EcoJustice Education, the authors rightly identify the ongoing environmental crisis with a broad cultural crisis in society. Employing a "cultural ecological analysis" (read green critical socio-linguistics), this text attempts to examine the relationship between anthropomorphic global climate change and a variety of interrelated socio-cultural "isms". Yet, after establishing the need for such an interdisciplinary treatment of environmental and social justice, the authors devote much of the book to familiar discussions of androcentrism/sexism, classism, racism, globalization/enclosure, and learning from indigenous communities, leaving critical environmental connections out in the cold; while these discussions are essential to a critical dialogue on education and environmentalism, the evidence and arguments provided by the authors fall short of their aims to comprehensively invite environmental education into the field of social justice education. In short, in EcoJustice education readers will learn broadly, if not deeply, about social justice, but walk away foggy as to the connection between the origins of traditional "isms" of Western culture and the environmental issues which now beset society.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    The book contains many good reports from and ideas of community building activities. While that itself is nice, the book's narrative is couched in a weird, earth-centric quasi-religious context which I simply could not swallow. Thus, caveat emptor. The book contains many good reports from and ideas of community building activities. While that itself is nice, the book's narrative is couched in a weird, earth-centric quasi-religious context which I simply could not swallow. Thus, caveat emptor.

  4. 5 out of 5

    clara

    excellent introduction to ecojustice education! Well-written and accessible. Offers many resources for the reader/teacher to discover.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brent

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sasha Cameron

  7. 4 out of 5

    Madeline Snyder

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tiina Eskola

  9. 4 out of 5

    R

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Marie

  11. 4 out of 5

    Odaesu

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michelle McKinney

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeanine

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paige Brown-Danovi

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bruja Ha

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sydney

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Howard

  22. 5 out of 5

    Georgeana

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hala Alhomoud

  25. 4 out of 5

    Coco

  26. 4 out of 5

    Communitybasededucation

  27. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  30. 4 out of 5

    Seymour Hersh

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