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Russia Through Women's Eyes: Autobiographies from Tsarist Russia

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Nineteenth-century Russia has been known to the West mainly through the writings of men. Russian women, however, were far from silent and have left vivid testimony about their families, their education, their careers, and their country. This collection presents, for the first time in English, the lives of eleven remarkable Russian women as told in their own words. These aut Nineteenth-century Russia has been known to the West mainly through the writings of men. Russian women, however, were far from silent and have left vivid testimony about their families, their education, their careers, and their country. This collection presents, for the first time in English, the lives of eleven remarkable Russian women as told in their own words. These autobiographies span the century and cover a wide range of classes and professions. Among the authors are women of the gentry (Natalia Grot), the merchant class (Aleksandra Kobiakova), the lower bureaucracy (Praskovia Tatlina), and the serf class (Liubov Nikulina-Kositskaia). They include writers (Elizaveta Lvova, Anastasia Verbitskaia), a journalist (Emilia Pimenova), an actress in the provincial theater (Liubov Nikulina-Kositskaia), and two physicians (Varvara Kashevarova-Rudneva, Ekaterina Slanskaia)—one the first woman to earn a medical degree in Russia, the other a doctor in the slums of St. Petersburg. Their memoirs show their fierce engagement in the debate over woman's nature, her duties and responsibilities, her upbringing, and her place in society. Each autobiography is introduced and annotated by Toby Clyman and Judith Vowles, who also provide a general introduction that situates these writings within the Russian and Western autobiographical traditions.


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Nineteenth-century Russia has been known to the West mainly through the writings of men. Russian women, however, were far from silent and have left vivid testimony about their families, their education, their careers, and their country. This collection presents, for the first time in English, the lives of eleven remarkable Russian women as told in their own words. These aut Nineteenth-century Russia has been known to the West mainly through the writings of men. Russian women, however, were far from silent and have left vivid testimony about their families, their education, their careers, and their country. This collection presents, for the first time in English, the lives of eleven remarkable Russian women as told in their own words. These autobiographies span the century and cover a wide range of classes and professions. Among the authors are women of the gentry (Natalia Grot), the merchant class (Aleksandra Kobiakova), the lower bureaucracy (Praskovia Tatlina), and the serf class (Liubov Nikulina-Kositskaia). They include writers (Elizaveta Lvova, Anastasia Verbitskaia), a journalist (Emilia Pimenova), an actress in the provincial theater (Liubov Nikulina-Kositskaia), and two physicians (Varvara Kashevarova-Rudneva, Ekaterina Slanskaia)—one the first woman to earn a medical degree in Russia, the other a doctor in the slums of St. Petersburg. Their memoirs show their fierce engagement in the debate over woman's nature, her duties and responsibilities, her upbringing, and her place in society. Each autobiography is introduced and annotated by Toby Clyman and Judith Vowles, who also provide a general introduction that situates these writings within the Russian and Western autobiographical traditions.

37 review for Russia Through Women's Eyes: Autobiographies from Tsarist Russia

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    A collection of excerpts from women's autobiographies and autobiographical sketches. Good overall. Some are more telling than others, but overall greatly informative. I especially enjoyed Sofia Khovshchinskaia's Reminiscences of Institute Life and Ekaterina Slanskaia's House Calls: A Day in the Practice of a Duma Woman Doctor in St. Petersburg. A collection of excerpts from women's autobiographies and autobiographical sketches. Good overall. Some are more telling than others, but overall greatly informative. I especially enjoyed Sofia Khovshchinskaia's Reminiscences of Institute Life and Ekaterina Slanskaia's House Calls: A Day in the Practice of a Duma Woman Doctor in St. Petersburg.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lillian Crawford

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alessandra

  4. 4 out of 5

    Carina

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jm

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  9. 5 out of 5

    Martha

  10. 5 out of 5

    Judy

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jwjones

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

  14. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Leigh

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nina

  17. 4 out of 5

    Danni

  18. 5 out of 5

    Moira Russell

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  20. 5 out of 5

    Molli

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erin Keffeler Giuliano

  22. 4 out of 5

    Darr

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kawthar

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dan Wheeler

  25. 4 out of 5

    Denise

  26. 5 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cristina Márquez

  28. 5 out of 5

    Luc Draqon

  29. 4 out of 5

    Julie Brooks

  30. 5 out of 5

    Misha

  31. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  32. 5 out of 5

    Iroulito91

  33. 5 out of 5

    Kym Ware

  34. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon

  35. 5 out of 5

    Stacie

  36. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

  37. 4 out of 5

    Aleks Veselovsky

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