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Everything, Vol. 1: Collected and Uncollected Comics from Around 1978-1982

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Reflective of the early 1980s before the appearance of Barry's well-known characters Marlys and Arna, the comics in "Everything, Vol. 1" cover the more adult subjects of bad love, bad perms, being single, Prince, and miserable break-ups--resulting in one of the most oft-quoted Barry sayings: Love is an exploding cigar which we all willingly smoke.


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Reflective of the early 1980s before the appearance of Barry's well-known characters Marlys and Arna, the comics in "Everything, Vol. 1" cover the more adult subjects of bad love, bad perms, being single, Prince, and miserable break-ups--resulting in one of the most oft-quoted Barry sayings: Love is an exploding cigar which we all willingly smoke.

30 review for Everything, Vol. 1: Collected and Uncollected Comics from Around 1978-1982

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emilia P

    Woop. There's a comic in here I want to share with you that reads thusly: ** Test your Self Respect A. I'm so awful B. I'm so awful C. I'm so (AWUL crossed out) awful Why? (In your own words) ** So beautiful, I photocopied it. This book collects early Ernie Pook Comeeks, Two Sisters (totally eerie..like..it's super simple but it gets under your skin in an upsetting and lingering and sweet way), and Boys and Girls. I devoured it. It's darker -- a teensy bit more towards the Crummy (that's a book) side of Woop. There's a comic in here I want to share with you that reads thusly: ** Test your Self Respect A. I'm so awful B. I'm so awful C. I'm so (AWUL crossed out) awful Why? (In your own words) ** So beautiful, I photocopied it. This book collects early Ernie Pook Comeeks, Two Sisters (totally eerie..like..it's super simple but it gets under your skin in an upsetting and lingering and sweet way), and Boys and Girls. I devoured it. It's darker -- a teensy bit more towards the Crummy (that's a book) side of Barry's work, but as I say that, I know that it's all dark. What I learned from this book: Lynda Barry is so strange and so shaky and so brave to speak about everything and nothing and the abyss between fun, lighthearted, round-edged comics and bitter scratchy comics (a woman after my heart who loves the raunchy underground comix of the 70s and the Family Circus with equal fervor). That abyss, where comics touch us. Dude. Dude. Also -- the older I get the more intensely and sadly I see the autobiography in her work. How simple and profound just, like, wanting a dog is. How hard it is to know who you are, and how to be that in the world, when you're ten and when you're 21 and when you're 50-something. I find myself saying please please just write it out without drawings and all the embellishment but then again, I know that I'm missing the point. Do your thang, my hero. I love you so.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    The first in a series of way-highly anticipated volumes that will collect Lynda Barry's entire comics oeuvre, Everything Vol. 1 starts at the very beginning (well, Duh), with Barry's unique, sometimes eccentric, often enthralling use of language already in evidence. Her funkily expressionistic, often raw drawings display a seemingly tossed-off skill and employ far more formalistic techniques and experiments than I'd remembered from back in the mid-80's when I used to read and reread her first bo The first in a series of way-highly anticipated volumes that will collect Lynda Barry's entire comics oeuvre, Everything Vol. 1 starts at the very beginning (well, Duh), with Barry's unique, sometimes eccentric, often enthralling use of language already in evidence. Her funkily expressionistic, often raw drawings display a seemingly tossed-off skill and employ far more formalistic techniques and experiments than I'd remembered from back in the mid-80's when I used to read and reread her first book, Girls and Boys (collected here in its entirety) over and over again. Very cool also to have a look at the full-year run of her never-collected-before comic strip "Two Sisters" from an early 80's paper in Seattle - it's really interesting work, often quite funny, with a wonderfully surreal bent. Barry's introduction and notes throughout tie these, her earliest comics, in with the work she is doing today, not only placing it all in context but demonstrating the trajectory of an artist's career, that in the end it is all of a piece. D&Q did a wonderful job producing this handsome keepsake volume. I eagerly await the next couple in the series, as my copies of her great 2nd and 3rd collections, Big Ideas & Everything in the World, are falling apart.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ginny Beck

    Lynda Barry is a grade-a genius and weirdo inspiration and I’ll probably give every book I read of hers 4 or 5 stars

  4. 4 out of 5

    ComicNerdSam

    It’s rough and angry and weird and fantastic. Very great to see the roots of one of my favorite comic artists, it was a blast.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gene Kannenberg Jr

    I can't be objective about Lynda Barry - I just think she is one of the very finest cartoonists ever. Reading BLABBER BLABBER BLABBER was a joyful experience. And it was quite interesting, after reading her two previous "how to be creative" books, to see how evident her thematic preoccupations have been from the earliest days of her career. She mines her early and inner lives not for autobiography, but for *verisimilitude* - her work feels solid, feels "real," in ways that are poetic and crystal I can't be objective about Lynda Barry - I just think she is one of the very finest cartoonists ever. Reading BLABBER BLABBER BLABBER was a joyful experience. And it was quite interesting, after reading her two previous "how to be creative" books, to see how evident her thematic preoccupations have been from the earliest days of her career. She mines her early and inner lives not for autobiography, but for *verisimilitude* - her work feels solid, feels "real," in ways that are poetic and crystalline. Cannot recommend her work highly enough!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Like the secret origin tale of your favorite comic book hero, "Everything" reveals the bubbling vat of radioactive spiderstuff that mutated into the work of one of our finest writer/artists. I heart Lynda Barry.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Madison

    The Two Sisters are the best.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Martinez

    Compilation of earliest Lynda Barry comics, starting from her childhood influences (I do now want to try to draw Rat Fink and capture his feeling). Includes pages with a current-day visual narrative, and selected comics she drew and published in her 20s. There's an amazing turn to, as she duly notes, bitterness, when she starts primarily drawing adults rather than kids in 1980-1981, which is especially interesting to me as a person who mostly knows her through Marlys. Also cool to see correspond Compilation of earliest Lynda Barry comics, starting from her childhood influences (I do now want to try to draw Rat Fink and capture his feeling). Includes pages with a current-day visual narrative, and selected comics she drew and published in her 20s. There's an amazing turn to, as she duly notes, bitterness, when she starts primarily drawing adults rather than kids in 1980-1981, which is especially interesting to me as a person who mostly knows her through Marlys. Also cool to see correspondence comics from Matt Groening and Gary Panter and to think of comics in the mail as a way (talented) people used to (still do?) amuse their friends.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mateen Mahboubi

    A collection of older material, some independently released some unreleased before. Some of it was okay, others I couldn't really get into. Despite being a big fan of Barry, I think that my expectations were somewhat tempered by the nature of the collection and it was pretty much what I expected. Good for the completionists or those who have read everything else but not where I would suggest someone who wants into Barry to start.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    Wild collection of Lynda Barry’s very early work. Cool to see many themes that have stayed the whole way through and her early drawing style. Lots of darkness and truth. You can see what was so special about her right from the start.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bayneeta

    Early stuff. Mostly didn't grab me, and I thought I'd go blind reading some of the very small print.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cathryn

    Really didn't care for (or "get," I guess...) pretty much all of the comics in this early collection. Was expecting something more like Marlys but these characters are darker, and just creepy-weird.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

    Such a fun book with inspiring quotes and drawings!!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Whiteford

    I love Lynda Barry. LOVE HER! And I have loved her since I discovered Ernie Pook's Comeek in Now Weekly when I was fifteen years old. That said, this collection, which features her earliest comics, wasn't my favourite. I already own Girls and Boys, the book that makes up the second half of the collection, so that was nothing new to me, and the earlier comics were kind of all over the place, which is to be expected when looking at someone's earliest work. I really enjoyed Barry's explanations abo I love Lynda Barry. LOVE HER! And I have loved her since I discovered Ernie Pook's Comeek in Now Weekly when I was fifteen years old. That said, this collection, which features her earliest comics, wasn't my favourite. I already own Girls and Boys, the book that makes up the second half of the collection, so that was nothing new to me, and the earlier comics were kind of all over the place, which is to be expected when looking at someone's earliest work. I really enjoyed Barry's explanations about each section of work, but I would have liked it if they were even longer and more evocative of the time when the comics were drawn. (See Pagan Kennedy's book "Zine" for a great example of how that can be done.) Mostly I'm looking forward to the next volume of this Barry collection. I got this first one from the library, but realistically I'll probably want the whole collection on my shelves at home eventually.

  15. 4 out of 5

    C.E. G

    I can't give Lynda Barry anything less than five stars. This is the first volume of her collected work, covering the years 1978-1981. Includes some of her early Ernie Pook comics, the Two Sisters strip, and the book Girls and Boys. Ernie Pook and Two Sisters were hilarious and sweet, and Girls and Boys reminded me of a less violent, straight woman's version of Hothead Paisan: Homicidal Lesbian Terrorist. I can't give Lynda Barry anything less than five stars. This is the first volume of her collected work, covering the years 1978-1981. Includes some of her early Ernie Pook comics, the Two Sisters strip, and the book Girls and Boys. Ernie Pook and Two Sisters were hilarious and sweet, and Girls and Boys reminded me of a less violent, straight woman's version of Hothead Paisan: Homicidal Lesbian Terrorist.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    This anthology republishes Barry's earliest works, including the odd "Ernie Pook" daily and the even weirder "Two Sisters" strip, up through her first collection, Boys and Girls. I think I would call her early style slipstream. It is totally out there and yet kind of nips at your soft spots, leaving you with an odd, deja vu feeling. Creative genius! This anthology republishes Barry's earliest works, including the odd "Ernie Pook" daily and the even weirder "Two Sisters" strip, up through her first collection, Boys and Girls. I think I would call her early style slipstream. It is totally out there and yet kind of nips at your soft spots, leaving you with an odd, deja vu feeling. Creative genius!

  17. 4 out of 5

    P.

    Lynda Barry! She writes funnier multiple-choice comics than Roz Chast. I probably shouldn't've read this all at once, but I had nothing else to do and some time to kill. So I read it all at once. It made me wish I'd been older in the 80s, and I was charmed to see Canadian hot dogs make an appearance--just like in Marc Bell's comics! Now I know that the use of the Canadian jumbo as a character/symbol in comics is a sign of a Good Thing.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Fanning

    Good! I like it. Some nice stuff here. Would totally have loved it if she'd included some behind the scenes stuff like "Here's what I was trying to do during this phase" or "Here was when my drawing started to be more X" or "I don't like these as much because I was trying too hard to do Z and it wasn't until later that I realized Y" or something, I don't know.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    My first Lynda Barry experience. What took me so long? I will be seeking out much more of her stuff now. My two favorite lines from this book have got to be... "I will tear my hair out and line your casket with it!!!" and "I feel like Twilight Zone music!" I also thoroughly enjoyed the "brain attack!" one.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    Okay, there was some roughness in the early years. But I still loved it- Evette & Rita are precious, and some of the later Girls & Boys hit really close to home about gender and relationships. Looking forward to the next round. Okay, there was some roughness in the early years. But I still loved it- Evette & Rita are precious, and some of the later Girls & Boys hit really close to home about gender and relationships. Looking forward to the next round.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    A groovy, #1 collection of Barry's super-early pre-Marlys stuff. The tone and drawing styles are kind of all over the place, but she starts to find her voice with "Girls and Boys" (reprinted here in its entirety, which is pretty cool).

  22. 5 out of 5

    Taffnerd

    I hope this series continues. It would be wonderful to have all of Lynda Barry's work collected in these gorgeous oversized hardcovers. Previous readings of her earliest work has usually left me wanting more Marlys and Maybone but this time it was easier to see the seeds of what was to come.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    How can you not love Lynda Barry!?!?! Interesting to see her early early work and inspiration - she was so young at the time! And Girls and Boys is and has always been brilliant - fun to see it in hard cover format. I was almost peeing my pants reading some of those frames.... timeless!

  24. 4 out of 5

    sarah

    It was fun to read Lynda's older comics, when she was exploring and discovering her style. It lagged a bit in the middle, only because "Two Sisters" was a comic that she eventually tired of and decided to kill off. "Girls and Boys" is varied, brilliant, painful, hilarious. Love her!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    Big Barry fan. Here she collects and reflects on her early work. She talks a bit about the process and development of her style. Her mainstay theme of the difficulties if childhood is very much in evidence here. Includes "Boys and Girls" which was previously published as a separate volume.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lollipopwater

    I feel Lynda Barry is a bit of a drug for me. I gobble every one of her books I get my hands on. I love her humor, bizarreness and at times, sadness she incorporates into her works. In "Everything, Vol. 1", it was cool to watch the evolution of her style. I really enjoyed "Two Sisters" comics.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    It's like someone opened Ms. Barry's brain and recorded every idiosyncratic detail that ever passed through. Quite an enjoyable experience to read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Lynda Barry rocks. These are earlier goodies. Charming young ruckus.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie

    Christmas gift from Meg!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Lynda Barry is the funk queen of the universe.

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