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Destruction and Evil Meet Life and Peace Adolf Hitler spilled the blood of millions for his own sake. Jesus Christ shed his own blood for the sake of millions. Hitler set himself up as a god and the masses succumbed. Jesus Christ was God in the form of lowly man. Hitler created a living hell for the masses. Jesus endured hell to save the masses. Hitler’s name is synonymous Destruction and Evil Meet Life and Peace Adolf Hitler spilled the blood of millions for his own sake. Jesus Christ shed his own blood for the sake of millions. Hitler set himself up as a god and the masses succumbed. Jesus Christ was God in the form of lowly man. Hitler created a living hell for the masses. Jesus endured hell to save the masses. Hitler’s name is synonymous with power, evil, and genocide. Jesus’ name with love, peace, and life. Put the two in a room together and you won’t believe your ears. The third compelling book in Ravi Zacharias’ Great Conversations series addresses fundamental issues of life and death, the evil of violence in light of the value of human life, and other tough issues in modern society. Adolf Hitler Evil. Hatred. Pride. Destruction. Jesus Christ Peace. Love. Humility. Life. What could they possibly have to talk about? In this compelling dialogue, two men of contrasting values meet face-to-face. They address fundamental issues of life and death, the evil of violence in light of the value of human life, and the timeless search for unity in diversity. Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the German pastor Hitler ordered hanged, joins in and the heat intensifies when the three begin to weigh the value of relationships, love, and forgiveness. You won’t want to miss this imaginative discourse that will take you inside the mind of one of the most brutal tyrants of all time…and the very God who made him. “The works of Ravi Zacharias are a vital resource around our house.” Frank Peretti Story Behind the Book This third book in the intriguing Great Conversations series takes Jesus out of the New Testament setting and places him in the 1900s to confront one of the world’s most influential people of all time—Adolf Hitler. The other books in the series reveal fictitious conversations Jesus might have with Buddha and with Oscar Wilde. The three books combine to attract readers who have friends practicing other religions, or who admire or question contemporary figures. These conversations are rich, begging for eavesdroppers. From the Hardcover edition.


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Destruction and Evil Meet Life and Peace Adolf Hitler spilled the blood of millions for his own sake. Jesus Christ shed his own blood for the sake of millions. Hitler set himself up as a god and the masses succumbed. Jesus Christ was God in the form of lowly man. Hitler created a living hell for the masses. Jesus endured hell to save the masses. Hitler’s name is synonymous Destruction and Evil Meet Life and Peace Adolf Hitler spilled the blood of millions for his own sake. Jesus Christ shed his own blood for the sake of millions. Hitler set himself up as a god and the masses succumbed. Jesus Christ was God in the form of lowly man. Hitler created a living hell for the masses. Jesus endured hell to save the masses. Hitler’s name is synonymous with power, evil, and genocide. Jesus’ name with love, peace, and life. Put the two in a room together and you won’t believe your ears. The third compelling book in Ravi Zacharias’ Great Conversations series addresses fundamental issues of life and death, the evil of violence in light of the value of human life, and other tough issues in modern society. Adolf Hitler Evil. Hatred. Pride. Destruction. Jesus Christ Peace. Love. Humility. Life. What could they possibly have to talk about? In this compelling dialogue, two men of contrasting values meet face-to-face. They address fundamental issues of life and death, the evil of violence in light of the value of human life, and the timeless search for unity in diversity. Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the German pastor Hitler ordered hanged, joins in and the heat intensifies when the three begin to weigh the value of relationships, love, and forgiveness. You won’t want to miss this imaginative discourse that will take you inside the mind of one of the most brutal tyrants of all time…and the very God who made him. “The works of Ravi Zacharias are a vital resource around our house.” Frank Peretti Story Behind the Book This third book in the intriguing Great Conversations series takes Jesus out of the New Testament setting and places him in the 1900s to confront one of the world’s most influential people of all time—Adolf Hitler. The other books in the series reveal fictitious conversations Jesus might have with Buddha and with Oscar Wilde. The three books combine to attract readers who have friends practicing other religions, or who admire or question contemporary figures. These conversations are rich, begging for eavesdroppers. From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for The Lamb and the Fuhrer: Jesus Talks with Hitler

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rod

    I love these books - Read this in one day. (two cups of coffee - in different locations.) Ravi is just about my favorite human being on this planet - don't tell my dog (he won't understand) and i'm attempting to read all of his books. I'm getting there. This book is one of the few that i'm not sure I totally agree with. Ravi has Jesus saying "I would like to take you to My Father Adolph. He awaits all who will come to Him. Just follow Me." Would Jesus really say that? The Calvinist in me shouts "N I love these books - Read this in one day. (two cups of coffee - in different locations.) Ravi is just about my favorite human being on this planet - don't tell my dog (he won't understand) and i'm attempting to read all of his books. I'm getting there. This book is one of the few that i'm not sure I totally agree with. Ravi has Jesus saying "I would like to take you to My Father Adolph. He awaits all who will come to Him. Just follow Me." Would Jesus really say that? The Calvinist in me shouts "Not likely". But In a twisty kind of way perhaps this could happen. similar to His comment "Why do you call me Good? Nobody is good except God alone." So Yes, Jesus can be a bit trixie at times. See - He does have a sense of humor...only Adolph won't be laughing. But that's the only challenge for me in this book. Ravi even shows that Hitler does not change. His very nature is set and stubborn, as I think all people's will be when they stand before God (as the demons will be also). Non-christians won't all of a sudden become perfectly humble Jesus lovers when they stand before God to be judged. They will probably all claim to defend their actions and EVEN accuse God of doing a poor job of revealing His truth: as Hitler does here. Personally I don't know if there's much difference between Hitler and most of the other Nazi's, or even people today who hate Jesus and the Bible - yet claim to use a more altruistic humanitarian means of removing Jesus from this planet. Is abortion and women's freedom really much different than the Nazi's mass murders and Germany's pride? It was a joy to see Dietrich Bonhoeffer confront Hitler. I look forward to reading this book again - SOON! I was trying to think who else would be a good chat with Jesus: Muhammad perhaps, or the Mormon's Joseph Smith, or Benny Hinn (He's not dead yet - but who cares!) or Maybe Christopher Hitchens...yeah, that would be enlightening - Ravi's too nice a guy to do that one. Maybe I'll do that myself.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jesseca Wheaton

    I want this book on my shelf. If this hadn't been a library book, it would have been almost totally highlighted. Ravi Zacharias's writings never ceases to cause me to stop and think. I'm literally not even sure what to say about this. If you want to see and better understand the huge difference between the religion taught in Nazi Germany and the Gospel of Christ, then you need to read this. I'm not sure what else to say. It's amazing. Read it!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Home time ago I read a book, Between Heaven & Hell. It is a fictional conversation between Aldous Huxley, John F. Kennedy and C.S. Lewis "just on the other side" of death (the three all died on the same day). It was an insightful read and is one I like and even value. This book is supposed to be a fictional account between Jesus and Hitler (with Dietrich Bonhoeffer as a sort of witness). Sadly this book wasn't really up to what I'd hoped to find. While it will to some be an uplifting read (at lea Home time ago I read a book, Between Heaven & Hell. It is a fictional conversation between Aldous Huxley, John F. Kennedy and C.S. Lewis "just on the other side" of death (the three all died on the same day). It was an insightful read and is one I like and even value. This book is supposed to be a fictional account between Jesus and Hitler (with Dietrich Bonhoeffer as a sort of witness). Sadly this book wasn't really up to what I'd hoped to find. While it will to some be an uplifting read (at least I suppose it will) it's more of a group of doctrinal statements placed in the Saviour's mouth. Hitler is more of a straw man screaming diatribes and simply there as a foil. You might try this one for yourself. I was really hoping for more (and I mean no disrespect to the writer or his ministry). Maybe try it for yourself if you're curious. Wasn't what i was hoping for.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    Peter Kreeft is good at these sort of books containing fictional dialogues between historical people. Unfortunately, Ravi Zacharias not so much in this book. Zacharias' Jesus doesn't really sound anything like Jesus as he rolls off dry apologetics and polemic statements. About a third of the way into the book, Dietrich Bonhoeffer joins the conversation and it becomes a double team. Of course, the challenge with doing Hitler is that he's so indisputably evil, there's no one to reach through nicet Peter Kreeft is good at these sort of books containing fictional dialogues between historical people. Unfortunately, Ravi Zacharias not so much in this book. Zacharias' Jesus doesn't really sound anything like Jesus as he rolls off dry apologetics and polemic statements. About a third of the way into the book, Dietrich Bonhoeffer joins the conversation and it becomes a double team. Of course, the challenge with doing Hitler is that he's so indisputably evil, there's no one to reach through niceties. It might be interesting to read Zacharias' conversation between Jesus and Buddha. At the end, while the book was theologically sound, it was very weak in presentation.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    Ravi Zacharias clearly lays out in conversational tone some of the main tenants of the Gospel and scripture. What does it mean to be created in the image of God? Why is human life important? What is the true pursuit of glory? What is the purpose of the church? What does the separation of church and state look like from a scriptural point of view? A great read for an introduction into the philosophical underpinnings of the Bible through conversation with an imposing figure in scripture. The writing Ravi Zacharias clearly lays out in conversational tone some of the main tenants of the Gospel and scripture. What does it mean to be created in the image of God? Why is human life important? What is the true pursuit of glory? What is the purpose of the church? What does the separation of church and state look like from a scriptural point of view? A great read for an introduction into the philosophical underpinnings of the Bible through conversation with an imposing figure in scripture. The writing itself leaves something to be desired, but the way it unpacks complicated philosophies and makes them approachable to all easily makes up for any shortcomings. Worth the read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Winston Jen

    Dull Platitudes that Ignore the Reality of Christianity Ravi introduces his book by comparing Jesus to Adolf Hitler. What he forgets to mention is the blood-soaked history of Christianity, especially over the thousand years that were the Dark Ages. He ignores the true meaning of the word sacrifice (a permanent loss given up for the greater good) and lumps Jesus in the same category as Bill Gates and Doctors Without Borders. They sacrificed far more than Ravi's mythological figure, who, according Dull Platitudes that Ignore the Reality of Christianity Ravi introduces his book by comparing Jesus to Adolf Hitler. What he forgets to mention is the blood-soaked history of Christianity, especially over the thousand years that were the Dark Ages. He ignores the true meaning of the word sacrifice (a permanent loss given up for the greater good) and lumps Jesus in the same category as Bill Gates and Doctors Without Borders. They sacrificed far more than Ravi's mythological figure, who, according to his own bible, is in heaven enjoying eternal bliss. Could he get any more petty and condescending to victims of human and natural tragedies? Probably so, but such is not the subject of this book. I have to give Ravi credit, however, for being honest enough to wear his motivations on his sleeves. Not only does he concede that this book is an open attempt to convert non-Christians to Christianity (although the specific brand of his religion seems deliberately nebulous, only described in nebulous terms such as "love" and "justice"). Again, he ignores the many verses in the bible used to justify slavery and genocide. If you are familiar with his book The End of Reason, Zacharias is happy to dismiss Jesus' silence on the issue of slavery simply by stating "Jesus was silent on a lot of issues." Wow. That's it? No explanation of why slavery was unimportant for a loving god to denounce? Good grief. People like Ravi deserve no respect on this issue. Ravi's thinly veiled attempt to present Christianity as the best moral framework is pathetic. The Ten Commandments are mentioned near the play's outset. What he forgets to mention are the numerous genocides carried out in the Old Testament (and which are frequently dismissed by apologists using special pleading). He also dismisses the well-documented studies that show non-religious countries (Japan, Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium etc) as having the lowest rates of murder, theft, rape and abortion. Where does good old Christian America sit in? As one of the most violent first-world countries existing today. Google the information. Google Nation Master if you doubt me. The facts are irrefutable. Religion allows people to justify anything with the get-out-of-hell free card that is "repentance." That destroys moral accountability before Christianity is even out of the gate. Even as a play, this book fails utterly. The dialogue is boring and trudges along at an appalling pace. Anyone who has read any of Zacharias' more lengthy pieces can see the conclusion and babbling diatribes a mile away. Lastly, I would like to comment on Ravi's comparison of Jesus and Hitler. According to Ravi, Hitler epitomizes evil, hatred, pride and destruction, while Jesus exemplifies peace, love, humility and life. Bunkum. Complete and utter bunkum. What could be more arrogant than claiming that one is the son of god? Little save claiming to be god himself. And would a loving god not start and end creation with heaven? Why set two beings up to fail? Christianity was used to justify slavery, as most honest individuals will admit.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    Others have rightly compared this book to the one by Peter Kreeft on a postmortem encounter between Lewis, Huxley, & Kennedy, which I have also read. It definitely wasn't as good as Kreeft's book and I didn't think that was that great, but it was better than this one. So as for this book - not terrible - not great - somewhere in between. Zacharias had some good ideas such as working in Bonhoeffer's "Who Am I" but unfortunately all the characters, including Jesus, still seemed rather flat. They a Others have rightly compared this book to the one by Peter Kreeft on a postmortem encounter between Lewis, Huxley, & Kennedy, which I have also read. It definitely wasn't as good as Kreeft's book and I didn't think that was that great, but it was better than this one. So as for this book - not terrible - not great - somewhere in between. Zacharias had some good ideas such as working in Bonhoeffer's "Who Am I" but unfortunately all the characters, including Jesus, still seemed rather flat. They all seemed more like personifications of ideals than as persons. But at least it is an easy and quick read so it's not a big time investment. Some reviewers really liked it, so I'd say that if you are interested go ahead and read it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Rabe

    This book had some interesting facts about the Third Reich and made solid points about how Hitler's violent actions were totally consistent with a naturalistic worldview. It also contrasted God's view of relationship, as demonstrated in the eternal, perfect relationship between the persons of the Trinity, and Hitler's view: that relationships, and people created in God's image, were disposable and only a means to self-exaltation and achieving his own designs. The book also wrestled with a seemi This book had some interesting facts about the Third Reich and made solid points about how Hitler's violent actions were totally consistent with a naturalistic worldview. It also contrasted God's view of relationship, as demonstrated in the eternal, perfect relationship between the persons of the Trinity, and Hitler's view: that relationships, and people created in God's image, were disposable and only a means to self-exaltation and achieving his own designs. The book also wrestled with a seeming contradiction in the life of Bonhoeffer, a pacifist Christian, who was involved in a plot to kill Hitler. Zacharias comes to the conclusion that Bonhoeffer's attempt to kill Hitler was a morally correct choice in a fallen world, as it was actually a defensive strategy designed to save lives and stop killing. He compares it to Rahab hiding the Israelite spies. All in all, though, I felt that the "literary device" of having Hitler defend his life to Jesus, with Bonhoeffer joining in as a witness, was one that made me uncomfortable. Ultimately, the point is made that Hitler was not being given a second chance to repent after death but rather that Jesus is just revealing to him (and to us) that he would never have repented no matter how long he would have lived. Certainly, this conclusion is true, but I was not able to suspend my disbelief about the unlikely scenario enough to enjoy the book without feeling ill at ease. I kept thinking that Hitler should just be on his face before the radiant Son of God worshiping Him and acknowledging His rightful Judgments.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    This is another work by Ravi Zacharias where he writes of an imaginary dialogue between famous people in history. In this book, it centers on the conversation between Hitler and Jesus. I've enjoyed other works by the author in the similar vein as this book, but I thought it was not as superb as the one Zacharias wrote on Jesus and Buddha titled, The Lotus and the Cross. It is hard to situate a realistic setting of Jesus dialoguing with Hitler, and the beginning of the book begins with an America This is another work by Ravi Zacharias where he writes of an imaginary dialogue between famous people in history. In this book, it centers on the conversation between Hitler and Jesus. I've enjoyed other works by the author in the similar vein as this book, but I thought it was not as superb as the one Zacharias wrote on Jesus and Buddha titled, The Lotus and the Cross. It is hard to situate a realistic setting of Jesus dialoguing with Hitler, and the beginning of the book begins with an American tourist in Germany with his German friend touring historical World War Two sites in a contemporary context. They end up imagining what the last moments of Hitler's life was like, and then Hitler waking up to face Jesus. Jesus ushers in other witnesses such as Hitler's henchmen and victims. I thought the book had quite a long dialogue with Bonheffer with Hitler in the presence of Hitler. In fact, it seems Bonhoffer spoke more than Jesus! I know that the book's main point was not to articulate a political philosophy, but I thought some of the dialogues would provoke the readers to think more deeply about a Christian theology of the State. The question of whether or not Hitler could have repented and become a Christian is raised at least twice throughout the book, and that sets it up with a dramatic ending of Hitler going to hell because he can't imagine his own enemy being forgiven and going to heaven. Ravi has done well in his other books that are similar to this book, though this time I do think there were some cheesy parts that I don't think appeared in his other works.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel N

    I first heard of Ravi Zacharias when I lived in India. The Christians there highly esteemed him as a great man of God and could not believe that I had never heard of him. Since then I have read several of his books and had an opportunity to hear him speak at University Presbyterian in Seattle. He is renown in the field of apologetics/worldview and, as an East Indian, brings a unique perspective to the field. His teachings and writings are deeply profound. In his "Great Conversations" series, Zac I first heard of Ravi Zacharias when I lived in India. The Christians there highly esteemed him as a great man of God and could not believe that I had never heard of him. Since then I have read several of his books and had an opportunity to hear him speak at University Presbyterian in Seattle. He is renown in the field of apologetics/worldview and, as an East Indian, brings a unique perspective to the field. His teachings and writings are deeply profound. In his "Great Conversations" series, Zacharias creates a series of "what if" dialogues between Jesus and various thinkers/leaders of our time. In this little book, Jesus "talks" with Hitler and includes Dietrich Bonhoeffer (marytred under the Third Reich regime). They touch on many philosophical topics such as the value of human life, unity in diversity, and issues of life and death. All of Zacharias' books will cause a person to think deeply about fundamental topics. Highly recommended. Also in the series: The Lotus and the Cross (Jesus talks with Buddha), Sense and Sensuality (Jesus talks with Oscar Wilde), and New Birth or Rebirth (Jesus talks with Krishna). Zacharias also has some significant books on the subject of Islam. I have several in my library.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    I've read the other books in this series, the with Krishna and Buddha have both been good. This was an interesting book to read, howeve I feel Mr. Zacharias failed to allow Hitler to rebut to Jesus talk about the Old Testament and how God allowed the Israelites to smite whole nations (including women and children.) Though he did a good job of presenting how Jesus can speak to Hitler, and included Bonhoeffer, I think that Ravi did a poor job of presenting a more in-depth conversation that I reall I've read the other books in this series, the with Krishna and Buddha have both been good. This was an interesting book to read, howeve I feel Mr. Zacharias failed to allow Hitler to rebut to Jesus talk about the Old Testament and how God allowed the Israelites to smite whole nations (including women and children.) Though he did a good job of presenting how Jesus can speak to Hitler, and included Bonhoeffer, I think that Ravi did a poor job of presenting a more in-depth conversation that I really think could have been beneficial. Though I was disappointed with this book, I think there is much to say in terms of having this kind of conversation, and I am intrigued by the series of imaginative conversations between past figures/religious figures and Jesus.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Becky B

    Normally, I really like Zacharias' writing, but the first half of this book did not impress me. I felt it was awkward and disjointed. All of a sudden you're in the middle of the conversation of two modern day people but there's no introduction to them. Eventually you figure out they're setting the scene for the rest of the book, but I really wish Ravi had done it differently. Thankfully, the second half of the book is much better. When we finally got around to the three-way conversation between Normally, I really like Zacharias' writing, but the first half of this book did not impress me. I felt it was awkward and disjointed. All of a sudden you're in the middle of the conversation of two modern day people but there's no introduction to them. Eventually you figure out they're setting the scene for the rest of the book, but I really wish Ravi had done it differently. Thankfully, the second half of the book is much better. When we finally got around to the three-way conversation between Jesus, Bonhoeffer and Hitler, Zacharias had some great points on how worldview can greatly impact how one treats humanity (and what one even considers humanity). I recommend the book for that portion. I’d even just skip the Erik & Daniel discussion at the beginning, and even the first part of Hitler’s discussion with Jesus. Until Bonhoeffer showed up I didn’t find it very poignant.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steve Penner

    This very brief book is an imagined conversation following Hitler's death at the judgment seat of Jesus with a few witnesses called, but mostly Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Zacharias uses the conversation to expound his version of the Christian role in politics. I enjoyed it although some find the whole genre highly suspect. It is most reminiscent of Peter Kreeft's "Between Heaven and Hell" with overtones of C. S. Lewis' "The Great Divorce." If you don't mind the imaginative and intellectual nature of t This very brief book is an imagined conversation following Hitler's death at the judgment seat of Jesus with a few witnesses called, but mostly Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Zacharias uses the conversation to expound his version of the Christian role in politics. I enjoyed it although some find the whole genre highly suspect. It is most reminiscent of Peter Kreeft's "Between Heaven and Hell" with overtones of C. S. Lewis' "The Great Divorce." If you don't mind the imaginative and intellectual nature of this political and spiritual discourse, it would be worth the brief amount of time it takes to read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shela

    Great book...really captured the mindset of Hitler. It also shows what it is to love people reguardless of their ethnicity, race, background, you name it... but that we are all made by God and should be treated justly reguardless...and how denying that truth comes from the lack of trusting that God made man. Heads into some major issues as to the fallibility in believing in an Evolutionary theory... I noticed Ravi points out an important truth for those who don't know about the ever present Hell Great book...really captured the mindset of Hitler. It also shows what it is to love people reguardless of their ethnicity, race, background, you name it... but that we are all made by God and should be treated justly reguardless...and how denying that truth comes from the lack of trusting that God made man. Heads into some major issues as to the fallibility in believing in an Evolutionary theory... I noticed Ravi points out an important truth for those who don't know about the ever present Hell that awaits those who do not follow after God. It is a Quick read

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ken Mullins

    "The reconciliation of liberty with law can be accomplished only when the heart is in tune with a higher law than merely man's law. When a people who have recognized their sin turn to God's grace, His law is seen a defining for the soul and for the well-being of a nation. Without redemption the law only serves to condemn them and draw attention to their shortcomings." (page 80) Well written, easy to read book, but full of deep truths.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Not knowing what to expect, I found a plausible interpretation of heaven, judgment, and a multitude of other topics from Ravi Zacharias. It provides some interesting details from Adolf Hitler's life, particularly during his time as Fuhrer. Near the end, the dialogue and reasoning became much clearer than earlier on, talking about power, love, and church/state relations. Zacharias definitely explains the Scriptures well in this little book about Hitler and Christ.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    Ravi has a way of communicating that resonates with most individuals. For me, this dialogue between Jesus and Hitler was what I would imagine it to be in reality. It wasn't all that deep in theology or philosophy but it seemed to bring a vivid personal sense that outstripped the academic depth that many apologetic books are known for. In my opinion, it was a very enjoyable short book on Ravi's perspective on how Hitler's encounter was when he met Jesus.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Patricia B. Gross

    Awesome evangelizing tool Awesome evangelizing tool This comic is full of the theology of God's love written in a way that is easy to understand. The comic book format lends an entertainment aspect that could get people to read it when they might not initially want to read the Bible and then lead to a thirst for further Bible study and their subsequent salvation.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    What would it have been like...that first moment Hitler was standing before His Maker a nanosecond after his earthly life was done? What might he have said to Jesus Christ? What answers might he have received? Zacharias--a brilliant thinker--imagines just that conversation...and it brings great issues and ideas to light.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ashton Herrod

    Wow, Ravi certainly took on a heavy topic, but I felt he did it with truth and sensitivity. Of course, we can't know what an actual conversation between these two would look like, but Ravi has given us a picture of a possibility. Ravi seems to know who Jesus is in his portrayal of him. A great read. I am glad to have read it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Toby

    I actually learned some interesting facts about Hitler that I didn't know as well as getting an easy to digest philosphical investigation into the conflict between Hitler and the true teachings of Christ. Well worth the read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Beka

    A very interesting look at what Christ might have said to Hitler when he was judged. What's sad is how likely his attitude (as portrayed in the book) would be to the real one and to other atheists' outlooks.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Byrd

    I love Ravi. His intelligence along with his gift to teach really comes through in this great conversation between two very different characters from history. I love the guest appearance of Dietrich Bohoeffer!

  24. 5 out of 5

    derek

    very creative and thought-provoking read, but not life changing.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Outstanding understanding of what the conversation between Hitler and Jesus could have been like. Awesome. Does a great job of touching on relativism as well.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Carlberg

    This is another in his Jesus talks to someone in history series. Not as good as the one with Buddha or Krishna, but OK.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Not anywhere near as interesting as the other books in the series.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christian Proano

    In my opinion by far as a narrative is the best in this "conversations series" profound thought about politics and religion... is simply great!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark Wood

    This one is in that genera of imaginary dialogues. It's pretty short, but worth a read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    Great Book talking about the problem of evil

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