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1,000 Years of Irish Poetry

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A survey of Irish poetry includes works from the seventh century to poems by Joyce, Yeats, and Moore.


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A survey of Irish poetry includes works from the seventh century to poems by Joyce, Yeats, and Moore.

30 review for 1,000 Years of Irish Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    René

    My introduction to Irish poetry and literature when I was a teenager. Introduced me to so many great Irish writers and translators and Irish myths, legends, historical figures, songs... Opened a door for me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Glen

    This is a very long anthology that tries very hard to be comprehensive. As a resource for those interested in the history of Irish poetry it is quite useful (the subtitle is "The Gaelic and Anglo-Irish Poets from Pagan Times to the Present"). For scholars it has less utility as it is rather short on annotations and there is no facing page original for those poems translated from the Irish. Also missing is much in the way of autobiographical data on the poets selected, especially the more recent This is a very long anthology that tries very hard to be comprehensive. As a resource for those interested in the history of Irish poetry it is quite useful (the subtitle is "The Gaelic and Anglo-Irish Poets from Pagan Times to the Present"). For scholars it has less utility as it is rather short on annotations and there is no facing page original for those poems translated from the Irish. Also missing is much in the way of autobiographical data on the poets selected, especially the more recent ones, so the reader has to do her own research to determine why certain poems and poets were selected for inclusion. The anthology is now somewhat dated, as it was originally compiled in 1947 and the copyright renewed in 1975, so those interested in more recent poetry (e.g., Seamus Heaney) will be disappointed. Still and all, an impressive collection which includes sainted figures from the distant past, anonymous songs and street poems, and some of the icons of Irish literature (e.g., Joyce, Yeats).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Letitia

    I mean...what do you say about one of the most prolific and literate societies in human history? I took this book with me to read on the cliffs of Dingle and Moher, to meditate on as I hiked over green hills and watched waves whip themselves into foam. It did not disappoint. 1000 years of an island that for some reason drives the poetic soul to verse captured in one volume is of course massive, in an inspiring way. I don't think there was a single selection from this collection that disappointed I mean...what do you say about one of the most prolific and literate societies in human history? I took this book with me to read on the cliffs of Dingle and Moher, to meditate on as I hiked over green hills and watched waves whip themselves into foam. It did not disappoint. 1000 years of an island that for some reason drives the poetic soul to verse captured in one volume is of course massive, in an inspiring way. I don't think there was a single selection from this collection that disappointed. Funny, sharp, witty, soulful, plaintive, romantic...the Irish do it all. The ballad, rather than the epic, is certainly the mainstay of the genre, and I would recommend to anyone who loves a rhyming couplet and tongue-in-cheek social commentary.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Fogerty

    This anthology of Irish poetry over the last 1,000 years is superlative. The pagan verse hangs well with Anglo-Irish poetry from 700 years later. A definite lyrical commonality arches through the centuries. I can’t possibly read it all so I am taking a sample from the different eras and from different poets.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    This took me almost a year to get through, but I’m glad that I gave it the time. It introduced me to so many poets I’d never read. It’s a great place to start for a history of Irish poetry, a quality springboard.

  6. 5 out of 5

    w gall

    There are a lot of poems in this book which I have enjoyed. Those that speak of their battles with the English not so much. Not that I don't sympathize with their plight under the English yoke. Plenty of uplifting Christian devotional poems, which I especially liked. There are a lot of poems in this book which I have enjoyed. Those that speak of their battles with the English not so much. Not that I don't sympathize with their plight under the English yoke. Plenty of uplifting Christian devotional poems, which I especially liked.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Snodgrass Reviews

    Kathleen Hoagland kept upping the suspense and you just wanted to keep turning the page.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kourtney

    If you like dram action and adventure, give this book a read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Belle Meade School

    891.621

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anya

    From 1947 (when rhymes were rimes). Starts with "the first poems written in Ireland", "those of Amergin or Aimirgin, who was brother of Evir, Ir, and Eremon, the first Milesian princes who colonized Ireland many hundreds of years before Christ. [...] the three pieces ascribed to Amergin are very ancient and very strange. But the whole story of the Milesian invasion is wrapped in mystery..." The Mystery, ???/ BCE/ start of Ireland (3) *Invocation to Ireland/ The Incantation, ??? (4-5) *Deer's Cry, St From 1947 (when rhymes were rimes). Starts with "the first poems written in Ireland", "those of Amergin or Aimirgin, who was brother of Evir, Ir, and Eremon, the first Milesian princes who colonized Ireland many hundreds of years before Christ. [...] the three pieces ascribed to Amergin are very ancient and very strange. But the whole story of the Milesian invasion is wrapped in mystery..." The Mystery, ???/ BCE/ start of Ireland (3) *Invocation to Ireland/ The Incantation, ??? (4-5) *Deer's Cry, St. Patrick, 7th c. (12-14) The Holy Man, 8th c. (17) My Little Lodge, 8th c. (18) From the Triads of Ireland, 9th c. (22-23) *Pangur Ban (27) *On the Flightiness of Thought, 10th c. (44-45) To Crinog, 10th c. (46-47) Hospitality in Ancient Ireland, 13th c. (49) *The Mothers' Lament at the Slaughter of Innocents, 13th c. (50-51) Columcille the Scribe, 11th c. (52) *The Ruined Nest, 11th c. (54-55) The Church Bell at Night, 12th c. (105) *Hail, Fair Morning, 15th c. (109-111) The Downfall of the Gael, 16th c. (140-142) The Careful Husband, 17th c. (150) Why, Liquor of Life?, 17th c. (177-178) O'Tuomy's Drinking Song, 18th c. (186-187) The Dawning of the Day, 18th c. (194) *The Midnight Court, 18th c. (204-227) -- reread The Little White Cat, 18th c. (228-229)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amber Shehan

    I have a hard time getting past the first two pages...Amergin just sums it all to well up for me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    i love poetry and I'm Irish... so this was a great read for me i love poetry and I'm Irish... so this was a great read for me

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lance Schonberg

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sam Thomas

  15. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lanea

  18. 5 out of 5

    Malone Davidson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Erinn Hill

  20. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Fox

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  23. 5 out of 5

    Frank

  24. 4 out of 5

    Candice

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maura

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lady Brainsample

  27. 5 out of 5

    Allie Farrell

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sean Andres

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

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