counter create hit Dion: The Wanderer Talks Truth (Stories, Humor Music) - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Dion: The Wanderer Talks Truth (Stories, Humor Music)

Availability: Ready to download

Dion came up out of the Bronx in the 50s and tore through the music charts in a ferocious display of talent. He continued to make great music while slowly returning to his Catholic roots. His hard-won wisdom filters through his stories whether he's recalling how he went shopping with John Lennon and ended up on the cover of Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band or what it w Dion came up out of the Bronx in the 50s and tore through the music charts in a ferocious display of talent. He continued to make great music while slowly returning to his Catholic roots. His hard-won wisdom filters through his stories whether he's recalling how he went shopping with John Lennon and ended up on the cover of Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band or what it was like to travel in the Jim Crow South with Sam Cooke. Praise for Dion... "To this day nobody, nobody can rock like Dion."—Lou Reed "He always had the name that said it all...Dion."—Bruce Springsteen "If you want to hear a great singer, listen to Dion. His genius has never deserted him."—Bob Dylan The audio edition of this book can be downloaded via Audible.


Compare

Dion came up out of the Bronx in the 50s and tore through the music charts in a ferocious display of talent. He continued to make great music while slowly returning to his Catholic roots. His hard-won wisdom filters through his stories whether he's recalling how he went shopping with John Lennon and ended up on the cover of Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band or what it w Dion came up out of the Bronx in the 50s and tore through the music charts in a ferocious display of talent. He continued to make great music while slowly returning to his Catholic roots. His hard-won wisdom filters through his stories whether he's recalling how he went shopping with John Lennon and ended up on the cover of Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band or what it was like to travel in the Jim Crow South with Sam Cooke. Praise for Dion... "To this day nobody, nobody can rock like Dion."—Lou Reed "He always had the name that said it all...Dion."—Bruce Springsteen "If you want to hear a great singer, listen to Dion. His genius has never deserted him."—Bob Dylan The audio edition of this book can be downloaded via Audible.

30 review for Dion: The Wanderer Talks Truth (Stories, Humor Music)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stoiph

    I have been consuming all things Dion the past few months in honor of and in memory of my Dad. It's/He has really, really been helping me through this. I loved (loved) learning that Dion is still married to his high school sweetheart and has three daughters (facts that parallel my own Dad). The book is a quick read. He gets so excited about everything and the style of his writing is just like sitting down and having a conversation with him. He's a born-again Christian and definitely the most imp I have been consuming all things Dion the past few months in honor of and in memory of my Dad. It's/He has really, really been helping me through this. I loved (loved) learning that Dion is still married to his high school sweetheart and has three daughters (facts that parallel my own Dad). The book is a quick read. He gets so excited about everything and the style of his writing is just like sitting down and having a conversation with him. He's a born-again Christian and definitely the most important aspect of his life and while I don't really identify with it, it was still interesting to read how important it is to him (and funny...lines like, "Some people act like rock and roll is the great savior of mankind. I'm here to tell you it's not. Somebody Else locked up that job a couple thousand years ago." Stuff like that.). I am going to read his other book (written in the 80s) where I think there is a little more depth (i wanna hear about the heroin), but this was still awesome. Dion is the cutest and he has the voice of an angel. Also, I decided I want to write Dion a good 'ol fashion fan letter.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a book I might have missed if it hadn't come to me as a review copy, and what a pity for me. I wasn't even sure who Dion DiMucci was at first, but then I heard him interviewed on The Catholics Next Door and I realized just who he was. (What's that say about me? Well, never mind that. This is about the book, not me.) This book is a delightful conversion story of the return to the Catholic Church of someone who had it all. Dion doesn't hash out things he's shared in other biographies, but r This is a book I might have missed if it hadn't come to me as a review copy, and what a pity for me. I wasn't even sure who Dion DiMucci was at first, but then I heard him interviewed on The Catholics Next Door and I realized just who he was. (What's that say about me? Well, never mind that. This is about the book, not me.) This book is a delightful conversion story of the return to the Catholic Church of someone who had it all. Dion doesn't hash out things he's shared in other biographies, but rather examines how his spiritual life changed, and how that brought him back to the Catholic Church. It might not be a book that will change your life, but it's a worthwhile read. It's also a slice of modern rock-and-roll history, which makes it fun.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joe Siccardi

    I expected something different. I expected the “truth” Dion DiMucci would discuss was about his career and its ups and downs. And, to be sure, there are the two traditional tenets associated with most celebrities … their rise and their ruin. The unexpected twist was a third pillar … redemption. Before you get there, you do have to trace the singer’s rise from the streets of The Bronx and his success that led to the all-familiar fall. Those stories consume the first half of the book. His father-in- I expected something different. I expected the “truth” Dion DiMucci would discuss was about his career and its ups and downs. And, to be sure, there are the two traditional tenets associated with most celebrities … their rise and their ruin. The unexpected twist was a third pillar … redemption. Before you get there, you do have to trace the singer’s rise from the streets of The Bronx and his success that led to the all-familiar fall. Those stories consume the first half of the book. His father-in-law, Jack, was one of those guys who didn’t seem bothered by anything. That irritated Dion. Jack had something Dion wanted … peace. One night he got his answer. As he passed the bedroom he saw Jack on his knees by his bed in prayer. A couple of nights later, Dion asked Jack to pray for him. The response, “Oh, Dion, you should try praying yourself. God likes to hear from strangers.” He tried it. He got on his knees just as he saw Jack do and he prayed in a rambling way. He asked God to take away his obsessions. And He did. That was the day – April 1, 1968 – the chains of alcohol and drugs were broken. Or, as he wrote, “It was like God was just waiting for me to ask.” His redemption led him through evangelical Christianity and eventually back to his Catholic roots, despite the fact the only time the baptized Catholic or his family went to church was for weddings or funerals. Now, he has become quite the apologist for Catholicism. His spiritual journey bounced through traditional and non-traditional denominations. As he put it, “… we Christians seemed to believe many different and contradictory things. Baptists believed in free will, but Calvinists didn’t. Lutherans believed Jesus was truly present in the Eucharist, but evangelicals didn’t and rarely celebrated the Lord’s Supper. Episcopalians put a lot of stock in their hierarchy (bishops, priests and deacons), while Baptists prided themselves on not having any. And on infant baptism, everybody was all over the doctrinal map …” That raised the question, if there is one Lord, one faith, one baptism (Ephesians 4:5) why were there tens of thousands of denominations, many of them believing all the others were heretics to some degree. Preachers were interpreting the Bible, but what qualified them? Ironically, it was a Presbyterian pastor who gave him some insight. “Unity in the essentials; liberty in the non-essentials; and charity in all things.” He went on to say the words were from Augustine … and Dion’s interest in all Augustine took over. He found an ally in his crisis of faith in Dr. John Haas, an Episcopalian minister who converted to Catholicism, and Marcus Grodi, a Presbyterian minister before he, too, became Catholic. And he concluded it was all about authority. Thus he, too, returned to his Catholic roots and that has become his Truth.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I'm a huge fan of Dion's music and, as a lover of music and rock n roll history, I've always been fascinated by Dion's huge impact on rock n roll as well as his ability to stay relevant and respected for so many decades. From his youth in the Bronx, to the day the music died, to his spiritual awakening, this book has covered it all. I read a review elsewhere that this book gets "preachy" near the end. And while it does focus mostly on his strong beliefs and feelings toward the church at the end, I'm a huge fan of Dion's music and, as a lover of music and rock n roll history, I've always been fascinated by Dion's huge impact on rock n roll as well as his ability to stay relevant and respected for so many decades. From his youth in the Bronx, to the day the music died, to his spiritual awakening, this book has covered it all. I read a review elsewhere that this book gets "preachy" near the end. And while it does focus mostly on his strong beliefs and feelings toward the church at the end, I think it's just because it has become the most important aspect of his life and it would be impossible to leave it out. With that said, if you are bothered by religious talk or biblical quotes, this may not be the Dion story you're looking for. I, however, loved it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    I highly enjoyed this tale of Dion's musical and spiritual journey -- I only wish he had added a few more anecdotes regarding the many musical talents he performed with in the 60s and 70s -- a bit too swift a journey! I highly enjoyed this tale of Dion's musical and spiritual journey -- I only wish he had added a few more anecdotes regarding the many musical talents he performed with in the 60s and 70s -- a bit too swift a journey!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    As the producer of this audio book I am the first to admit bias here, but I will be honest and say that I do not personally like every audio book I produce. This one I like! Dion's recollections of the past, his growing up in Italian immegrant America, the advent of Rock & Roll, a first person account of the plane crash that killed Buddy Holly & others, shopping with John Lennon, etc... All make for great listening. Dion's spiritual journey from fame & fortune to drugs & booze to evangelicalizm a As the producer of this audio book I am the first to admit bias here, but I will be honest and say that I do not personally like every audio book I produce. This one I like! Dion's recollections of the past, his growing up in Italian immegrant America, the advent of Rock & Roll, a first person account of the plane crash that killed Buddy Holly & others, shopping with John Lennon, etc... All make for great listening. Dion's spiritual journey from fame & fortune to drugs & booze to evangelicalizm and finally back to his Catholic roots is built upon this backdrop. In many ways, his story is Amerca's story. Frank Montenegro makes a great voice for this book. If I have any regrets in production, its that Dion couldn't be convinced to read it. Franks read is strong though, and technically perfect which may be why Dion thought it better to leave it to the pro's. I recommend this audio book to all my friends.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    The book gave a decent insight into Dion, who is a deeply religious man. At times, he starts stories; however, he doesn't finish them to make a religious point. I probably would be better served reading his actual autobiography. The book gave a decent insight into Dion, who is a deeply religious man. At times, he starts stories; however, he doesn't finish them to make a religious point. I probably would be better served reading his actual autobiography.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    This book is part autobiography, part faith story written by Dion Dimucci, former teen idol from the 1960's. This book is part autobiography, part faith story written by Dion Dimucci, former teen idol from the 1960's.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kotoole1

    Don't get me wrong, I like Dion and his music, the stories he told throughout were honest and interesting. I enjoyed most of the book but towards the end he just gets a little too Religious... Don't get me wrong, I like Dion and his music, the stories he told throughout were honest and interesting. I enjoyed most of the book but towards the end he just gets a little too Religious...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dan Veres

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rick

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

  13. 4 out of 5

    Errol Laurie

  14. 4 out of 5

    J Koch

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  16. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Behnke

  17. 5 out of 5

    Judith Heidenrich

  18. 4 out of 5

    David

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jared

  20. 4 out of 5

    Roy Johnson

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline A. Pisauro

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

  23. 5 out of 5

    Diane F Frazee

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ivy L.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth T.Weaver

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carol

  27. 4 out of 5

    Titaniel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gil Nelson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Jamerson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joe Natali

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.