counter create hit Information Feudalism: Who Owns the Knowledge Economy? - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Information Feudalism: Who Owns the Knowledge Economy?

Availability: Ready to download

The definitive account of how multinational corporations have seized control of intellectual property rights. In a few short years, the battle over intellectual property rights has emerged from obscurity to become front-page news. The continent-hopping, three-year court battle fought by activists to bring cheap versions of desperately needed AIDS drugs to South Africa is bu The definitive account of how multinational corporations have seized control of intellectual property rights. In a few short years, the battle over intellectual property rights has emerged from obscurity to become front-page news. The continent-hopping, three-year court battle fought by activists to bring cheap versions of desperately needed AIDS drugs to South Africa is but one example of how this seemingly arcane area of international regulation has become a crucial battleground in the twenty-first century and is animating activists the world over. This powerful book is the definitive history of how the new global intellectual property regim--the rulebook for the knowledge economy--came to be. Drawing on more than five years of research and more than five hundred interviews with key figures—including negotiators for First and Third World countries, leaders of multinational corporations, and public-interest experts, Information Feudalism uncovers the story of how a small coterie of multi-national corporations wrote the charter for the global information order. Information Feudalism is an authoritative history of the demise of the world's intellectual commons, and a potent call for democratic property rights.


Compare

The definitive account of how multinational corporations have seized control of intellectual property rights. In a few short years, the battle over intellectual property rights has emerged from obscurity to become front-page news. The continent-hopping, three-year court battle fought by activists to bring cheap versions of desperately needed AIDS drugs to South Africa is bu The definitive account of how multinational corporations have seized control of intellectual property rights. In a few short years, the battle over intellectual property rights has emerged from obscurity to become front-page news. The continent-hopping, three-year court battle fought by activists to bring cheap versions of desperately needed AIDS drugs to South Africa is but one example of how this seemingly arcane area of international regulation has become a crucial battleground in the twenty-first century and is animating activists the world over. This powerful book is the definitive history of how the new global intellectual property regim--the rulebook for the knowledge economy--came to be. Drawing on more than five years of research and more than five hundred interviews with key figures—including negotiators for First and Third World countries, leaders of multinational corporations, and public-interest experts, Information Feudalism uncovers the story of how a small coterie of multi-national corporations wrote the charter for the global information order. Information Feudalism is an authoritative history of the demise of the world's intellectual commons, and a potent call for democratic property rights.

30 review for Information Feudalism: Who Owns the Knowledge Economy?

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    opening note: I notice, upon re-reading, that most of this review seems negative. That is because there is much more to say about what is wrong with it than what is right, despite the fact that what is right with this text is surely more than 95% of the book. Don't let the scathing critiques of Drahos' opinions deter you from reading it, nor even his less than perfect presentation of facts; the facts themselves are valuable, numerous, and educational. Take note of the fact I gave this book four opening note: I notice, upon re-reading, that most of this review seems negative. That is because there is much more to say about what is wrong with it than what is right, despite the fact that what is right with this text is surely more than 95% of the book. Don't let the scathing critiques of Drahos' opinions deter you from reading it, nor even his less than perfect presentation of facts; the facts themselves are valuable, numerous, and educational. Take note of the fact I gave this book four stars; I definitely recommend it for those interested in the subject. The book Information Feudalism is primarily an in-depth chronicle and analysis of the development of "intellectual property" policy in the final decades of the twentieth century, in all their gory, coercive details, though it also covers more distant history of copyrights and patents, contrasts with freer times and circumstances when more significant and frequent world-changing innovations were the norm, and other relevant matters. It suffers some compositional flaws, such as sometimes torturous sentence construction; it labors under an organizational style that, if systematic, is substantially opaque with both topic-area and chronological organizational guidance violated rather more often than followed; and its author Peter Drahos (presumably along with his collaborator John Braithwaite) uncritically accepts and repeatedly asserts the popular assumption that copyright, patent, and trademark laws provide important (and even indispensable, necessary) benefits that are only overwhelmed by abuses even as his narrative explanations of the disastrous consequences of such policy are unmitigatedly and unexceptedly negative in all respects. He cannot, in fact, even manage to describe a single clear connection between "intellectual property" law of any kind and a benefit gained apart from the enrichment of some privileged copyright or patent holder at the far greater expense of others, in some cases millions of people killed by treatable diseases. Every argument made in favor of keeping some diminished or reformed "intellectual property" regime in place while magically preventing the development of information feudalism is rendered utterly toothless by the relentless progression of dire facts recounted for the reader prior to the statements that copyrights and patents are "important". The weakness of such claims becomes comical, or tragic, or tragicomic, by the end of the book -- especially given Drahos' blithe repetitions of the unsupported assumption that "intellectual property" in some form or other is "important" in the midst of his closing offerings of solutions to the problems of the information feudalism regime. Whether the reader believes copyright, patent, and trademark laws are actually necessary to continued advances and public benefits or not, Drahos' assertions to that effect are wholly lacking a sense of the genuine, sprinkled pointlessly amongst the irresistibly depressing coffin nails he drives into the notion that copyrights, patents, and trademarks have actually provided any meaningful benefits. He even manages to undermine his assertions about the effectiveness of his recommended taxation, funding, and compulsory licensing schemes, given that the benefits these policies are evidently meant to provide would actually be the norm in the absence of monopolistic privileges for the management, distribution, and use of knowledge. Such inadequacies of the text fail to render the book worse than slightly blemished in its overall value, however, for that value is impressive. As a collection of relevant facts drawn from varied sources in the author's and collaborator's exhaustive research, Information Feudalism is a masterpiece, despite its shortcomings in composition and critical analysis. It comes unreservedly recommended for anyone who wishes to learn the true face of international "intellectual property" policy and the manner in which it affects billions of lives to their detriment.

  2. 4 out of 5

    elizabeth

    this book is amazing... the author spent years interviewing people who negotiated treaties that have impacted the economy of information, and essentially determine who can have access to what information at what price. it's not for the faint of heart, but this is the most comprehensive analysis of the global intellectual property regime out there... it gets right into the heart of why drugs can be so expensive in developing countries and how the united states launders its laws by convincing a mu this book is amazing... the author spent years interviewing people who negotiated treaties that have impacted the economy of information, and essentially determine who can have access to what information at what price. it's not for the faint of heart, but this is the most comprehensive analysis of the global intellectual property regime out there... it gets right into the heart of why drugs can be so expensive in developing countries and how the united states launders its laws by convincing a multilateral forum to adopt a treaty, then coming back to congress and saying: look at this international treaty, we have to make a domestic law so that we comply with it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laurel Tom

    I really enjoyed the first two chapters I read of this book, but I don't think this book was too well organized or edited. I think there's a lot to learn from this book, but I don't have the time this semester or too much personal interest (at the moment) in going further into this history at this time. Even though I've not finished finished it, I'm rating this book four stars because I really enjoyed what I read and plan to keep this book and return to it one day. I really enjoyed the first two chapters I read of this book, but I don't think this book was too well organized or edited. I think there's a lot to learn from this book, but I don't have the time this semester or too much personal interest (at the moment) in going further into this history at this time. Even though I've not finished finished it, I'm rating this book four stars because I really enjoyed what I read and plan to keep this book and return to it one day.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    On one hand, some of the info about certain legislation is out of date. On the other hand, with the TPP and revisions to DMCA, the information about how these processes work and how corporations and government instill a state of contemporary feudalism, is as important as ever.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kush Naker

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michele Malloy

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eric Fitzgerald

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

  9. 4 out of 5

    Xaviour

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Lee

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emer Mccarthy

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bruna Castanheira

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gary Winslett

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ana

  16. 5 out of 5

    John

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emer Mccarthy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nick Geiser

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  23. 5 out of 5

    Carl

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karishma Gokani

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pedro Mizukami

  26. 5 out of 5

    Frank Muller

  27. 5 out of 5

    David

  28. 4 out of 5

    Zain

  29. 4 out of 5

    DJ CNo

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gloss

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.