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Disciple: Getting Your Identity from Jesus

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"Go therefore and make disciples of all nations." --Jesus This is a book about pursuit. How God pursues people. How we pursue him. And how he uses us to pursue others. God pursued us when Jesus came into this ruined world as an agent of redemption, asking us to follow him and to become his disciples. Yet, what does Jesus actually mean by disciple? And as his disciples, what "Go therefore and make disciples of all nations." --Jesus This is a book about pursuit. How God pursues people. How we pursue him. And how he uses us to pursue others. God pursued us when Jesus came into this ruined world as an agent of redemption, asking us to follow him and to become his disciples. Yet, what does Jesus actually mean by disciple? And as his disciples, what is our mission? Pastor Bill Clem masterfully answers these questions, explaining what Jesus meant when he called his followers "disciples," and what he intended when he told us to then make disciples. This helpful guide weaves together Scripture and real-life stories to illustrate the essential elements of Christian discipleship. Whether you've just become a follower of Jesus or you've been one for years, Disciple will help you see that Jesus invites his people to freedom rather than mere rule keeping, and it will give you a relational framework--instead of behavioral prescriptions--for pursuing God.


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"Go therefore and make disciples of all nations." --Jesus This is a book about pursuit. How God pursues people. How we pursue him. And how he uses us to pursue others. God pursued us when Jesus came into this ruined world as an agent of redemption, asking us to follow him and to become his disciples. Yet, what does Jesus actually mean by disciple? And as his disciples, what "Go therefore and make disciples of all nations." --Jesus This is a book about pursuit. How God pursues people. How we pursue him. And how he uses us to pursue others. God pursued us when Jesus came into this ruined world as an agent of redemption, asking us to follow him and to become his disciples. Yet, what does Jesus actually mean by disciple? And as his disciples, what is our mission? Pastor Bill Clem masterfully answers these questions, explaining what Jesus meant when he called his followers "disciples," and what he intended when he told us to then make disciples. This helpful guide weaves together Scripture and real-life stories to illustrate the essential elements of Christian discipleship. Whether you've just become a follower of Jesus or you've been one for years, Disciple will help you see that Jesus invites his people to freedom rather than mere rule keeping, and it will give you a relational framework--instead of behavioral prescriptions--for pursuing God.

30 review for Disciple: Getting Your Identity from Jesus

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joseph McBee

    Let me begin by describing what I really appreciated about this book. I appreciated the author's passion for his subject and his passion for God. I also appreciated Clem's high view of Scripture and the fact that the book was loaded with passages of Scripture to support and expound on his conclusions. Further, I appreciated the fact that the book was gospel rich and that Clem referred often to God's grace, mercy, and love. The book was also filled with true and genuine descriptions of God's chara Let me begin by describing what I really appreciated about this book. I appreciated the author's passion for his subject and his passion for God. I also appreciated Clem's high view of Scripture and the fact that the book was loaded with passages of Scripture to support and expound on his conclusions. Further, I appreciated the fact that the book was gospel rich and that Clem referred often to God's grace, mercy, and love. The book was also filled with true and genuine descriptions of God's character that were often times revelatory. There were many occasions when I would feel challenged and convicted by what I read. However, I appreciated the fact that the author was not coming at me with a verbal baseball bat so that I would feel "guilty," he merely wrote the truth and allowed the Holy Spirit to convict where He willed. The only "complaint" I had with the book was the style in which Clem wrote. I wouldn't even mention it except that it was truly troublesome. There was an almost stream of consciousness style to much of his writing and many times sub-topic headings did not seem to match the content beneath them. He would also often seemingly change directions mid-paragraph like he had writer's ADD. This combination became so difficult to navigate at times I found myself going back over passages and even entire pages trying to catch on to his train of thought. Several times I had to give up in frustration and stand on the tracks, so to speak, watching the train leave without me on it. The thing that makes this so disappointing is that there is a lot of wonderful material in this book. It just gets lost in writing that is sometimes thick and difficult to navigate and at other times, downright confusing. It was like the author wasn't really sure who his audience was. For example, on one page he is using quotes that contain words like "fecund fellowship" and "pactum salutis" without even explaining what they mean, assuming I suppose that his readers will have the theological background to understand them. Then on another page he writes "we've already seen how God rolls." What? It was all very confusing. So much so that I was tempted to give up several times. However, there is a lot of powerful material here and that is why I continued to forge ahead. There was enough there that I was willing to overlook style (troublesome though it was) in order to get the truth that was being revealed to me by the Holy Spirit through the book. I hope all readers will give it the same effort. I found that, in the end, it was worth it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Élizabeth

    Excellente ressource! C’est juste que je n’ai pas été captivée par l’écriture; je devais me forcer à finir le livre.

  3. 4 out of 5

    logankstewart

    I selected Bill Clem's Disciple: Getting Your Identity from Jesus because I thought the book was about discipleship groups, mentors/mentees, etc. and practical applications for modern life. Instead, I found myself reading a book about what it means to be a Christian for the first 3/4 of the book. I almost get the feeling that Clem would prefer to use the word Disciple instead of Christian, though that is pure speculation. Nevertheless, Disciple proved to be a mostly interesting and thought provo I selected Bill Clem's Disciple: Getting Your Identity from Jesus because I thought the book was about discipleship groups, mentors/mentees, etc. and practical applications for modern life. Instead, I found myself reading a book about what it means to be a Christian for the first 3/4 of the book. I almost get the feeling that Clem would prefer to use the word Disciple instead of Christian, though that is pure speculation. Nevertheless, Disciple proved to be a mostly interesting and thought provoking book. Divided into 12 chapters, the book alternates between the biblical ideal of the chapter's topic (such as Community), followed by a chapter with how we've distorted it. I really enjoyed the layout like this, and as I progressed through the book it was obvious how much latter chapters built off the previous ones. I also liked that each chapter ended with a "homework assignment." Clem gives the reader Scripture to read and ponder over, and often challenges us to act on these verses. As for the last chapters, this is really where practical thoughts on discipleship came up. I suppose a foundation must first be established before application can be described, and Clem definitely built off his groundwork. The art of discipleship and mentoring is neglected by many today. Too often we distort the very definition of "disciple," thinking that it's a stagnant "relationship." We replace Jesus' Great Commission in Matthew 28, "Go and make disciples" with "Go and make converts." It's obvious Clem has a heart for loving on people and investing in them, and he backs this imperative with plenty of Scripture. He wants the reader to make disciples (as well as be discipled), not coverts. All in all, I enjoyed a lot of what Bill Clem was saying in Disciple, and I think it would be especially helpful for early Christians. The first majority of the book reads as a sort of "Christian Essentials" text. I was more interested in the latter half, and indeed Clem has some worthwhile things to say there, though I wish this part were longer.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Bettger

    Pastor Bill Clem has been teaching on this subject for years now. I have been very fortunate to sit under his teaching numerous times. At Mars Hill Church we have used this robust definition of being a disciple of Jesus for many years now. In a nut shell it consists of four key aspects: #1. Image = Being an image bearer of God gives us Identity, purpose, and meaning. This is because of His character, and the work He has accomplished. #2. Worship = as His Image bearers we are created as worshipers. Pastor Bill Clem has been teaching on this subject for years now. I have been very fortunate to sit under his teaching numerous times. At Mars Hill Church we have used this robust definition of being a disciple of Jesus for many years now. In a nut shell it consists of four key aspects: #1. Image = Being an image bearer of God gives us Identity, purpose, and meaning. This is because of His character, and the work He has accomplished. #2. Worship = as His Image bearers we are created as worshipers. We see this in the God head itself. God is by nature other-centric. Father pours out to Son and Spirit, Son pours out to Father, Spirit, Spirit pours out to Father, Son. We do the same. We pour are made to be filled up by Him, and pour out to Him. What I mean by pour out is to ascribe worth, value, adoration to Him. However because of sin we get filled up by things of our own invention, or things God has created, and thus pour out to those things instead of Him. This is called idolatry. #3. Community = We see the Trinitarian God in community with Himself. As His image bearers He has designed us to be in community with each other. #4. Mission = God has a mission, and has called us to be a part of the work He is doing. We do this in community with other people. Each of these points is expounded upon and has tons of scripture references. These are obviously Biblical truths, which should enhance all of our lives with meaning and purpose. Every chapter has a great set of questions and a Bible study reflection to go along with it. I recommend setting aside the time needed to go through each of these studies.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Wesley Yaryan

    A good beginners book on discipleship. There were some areas where I disagreed with him, but it needs more depth.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dave Martin

    Like the title itself, the content of the book is fine but unfocused. It’s like an older, pixelated photo next to a high-definition image, which would represent a number of more recent titles on the subject of disciple-making, many of which can be found through the site discipleship.org. Good info, but not presented in a strategic or actionable format.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tim Chaney

    This was a fabulous book that seeks to encourage the Christian to find their identity in Christ as His disciple. Clem studies how a disciple made in the image of God should see themselves in God's story in areas such as image, worship, community, and mission. He also talks about many ways in which each of these four things can be distorted in a fallen world. I found each of these categories helpful as Clem gave a solid biblical framework through which to view the Christian life. Then the chapter This was a fabulous book that seeks to encourage the Christian to find their identity in Christ as His disciple. Clem studies how a disciple made in the image of God should see themselves in God's story in areas such as image, worship, community, and mission. He also talks about many ways in which each of these four things can be distorted in a fallen world. I found each of these categories helpful as Clem gave a solid biblical framework through which to view the Christian life. Then the chapters on distortions were especially helpful as he was clear about what he meant and deconstructed the folly of the distortions. Clem finishes with a call toward a discipleship plan. This plan involves the reader surrounding him or herself with the proper shepherd-coach or even multiple shepherd-coaches that can help them mature in accordance with a self-designed plan. He also includes a final chapter on multiplication which takes the process and lays it out in the lives of others. I especially liked Clem's hesitancy to be overly formulaic in the discipling process. Much of what we find in Christian literature about discipleship focuses on a "reproducible process" that is really just code for a formulaic process that is not unique to the struggles and needs of the individual. If you are looking for a packaged way to "make disciples" by putting them through a list of generalized assignments, this book is not what you are looking for. However, it might be helpful for you in seeing a different perspective that focuses more on imaging Christ and the individual's needs than the reproducible process. This is a great book. Get it! Read it, and use it to help you be a valuable shepherd-coach in the life of another disciple.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mindi

    A very encouraging book about discipleship. Unlike any other recent books on discipleship, Clem advises that true discipleship does not just happen in the time allotted for a weekly meeting, but also in the in-between times. He asserts that if those in-between times do not happen, that discipleship is ineffective because it is not sharing one's life. Wow. The thought I have been looking for all of my Christian life. May his tribe increase. A very encouraging book about discipleship. Unlike any other recent books on discipleship, Clem advises that true discipleship does not just happen in the time allotted for a weekly meeting, but also in the in-between times. He asserts that if those in-between times do not happen, that discipleship is ineffective because it is not sharing one's life. Wow. The thought I have been looking for all of my Christian life. May his tribe increase.

  9. 4 out of 5

    B

    This book became better as I moved further into it. Int he earlier chapters I found the notes for further study very useful, it was nice to have a list of references dealing with a certain topic like the Trinity. As I progressed through the book I found it applying more to me, helping me think through things like community, fellowship, and my interactions with the church. I really benefited from considering the intimacy level that really should occur within the body of Christ.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eric Molicki

    This work was not programmatic as much as paradigmatic. It provided a solid paradigm for understanding the identity of a disciple with excellent and current examples of the way idolatry distorts each of those aspects of discipleship. Its strengths are not found in profound insights as much as a thorough and compelling picture of the "destination" of discipleship. This work was not programmatic as much as paradigmatic. It provided a solid paradigm for understanding the identity of a disciple with excellent and current examples of the way idolatry distorts each of those aspects of discipleship. Its strengths are not found in profound insights as much as a thorough and compelling picture of the "destination" of discipleship.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gabe

    What I appreciated most about the book was that it speaks to holistic discipleship, it is practical, even with thoughtful reflective questions at the end of each chapter, and it is transferrable information. It can be a great instrument to help others get a clearer vision of what it means to be a disciple and make disciples.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Josh Simons

    Just finished this book. I found it to be not only eye opening to many of the ways I desire to live as a bit player in God's story, but also how image, worship, community, and mission can be distorted. All of this while saturated in Jesus's accomplished work, mercy and grace in life of a disciple. 5 stars big time. Big time. Just finished this book. I found it to be not only eye opening to many of the ways I desire to live as a bit player in God's story, but also how image, worship, community, and mission can be distorted. All of this while saturated in Jesus's accomplished work, mercy and grace in life of a disciple. 5 stars big time. Big time.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura Haske

    This isn't a "how to" discipleship book. It's a thought-provoking look at what it means to follow Jesus and not just accept him. The focus on identity, community and imagining Christ pushed the analysis deeper than other books in the christian-living genre. I enjoyed it. This isn't a "how to" discipleship book. It's a thought-provoking look at what it means to follow Jesus and not just accept him. The focus on identity, community and imagining Christ pushed the analysis deeper than other books in the christian-living genre. I enjoyed it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Natasha

    I loved the practical and biblical applications about what it is to be a disciple in Christ and what it is to make more disciples. A no-nonsense, direct approach is always best and Pastor Bill Clem does that successfully in this book. A must-read for anyone who loves Jesus.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Renwick

    I would definitely recommend. Re:Lit has hit it out of the ballpark once again! :) Bill Clem writes in such a simple and understandable yet profound style. It's quite unique I should say. And it's a great study as well (with study questions at the end of each chapter). I would definitely recommend. Re:Lit has hit it out of the ballpark once again! :) Bill Clem writes in such a simple and understandable yet profound style. It's quite unique I should say. And it's a great study as well (with study questions at the end of each chapter).

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carl

    Excellent, practical and biblical encouragement and advice in how to follow Jesus and disciple others to do likewise. At times encouraging, convicting and challenging this book is well worth the read and going into my reread cycle.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Glyn Williams

    Well written and gives you something to think about in terms of your relationship with God. If you had to live your life the way Bill describes, you will most certainly experience a life change that will impact those around you. A good, easy read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brenden

    Really great and practical examples of how to integrate discipleship in our daily lives. Not a difficult read but has some nice application points to chew on.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Carlberg

    An excellent book...you should all read it (the title says it all).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jared Totten

    Helpful at times, but suffered from a lack of clear direction.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    loved it

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matt Moran

    Good content, but not a well written or well organized book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael Newton

    This book was ok definitely not my favorite but its ok.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rohan Joel

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matt Wolf

  26. 5 out of 5

    Josh Graves

  27. 4 out of 5

    MissBoi

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shiona E. Gonsalves

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andy Kinnaird

  30. 5 out of 5

    James D

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