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Why I Left The Contemporary Christian Music Movement: Confessions of a Former Worship Leader

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For many churches today, music has become one of the most important factors in attempting to reach unbelievers with the gospel. Writing from his own personal experience as a former worship leader, Dan Lucarini questions the use of contemporary music in the worship of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.


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For many churches today, music has become one of the most important factors in attempting to reach unbelievers with the gospel. Writing from his own personal experience as a former worship leader, Dan Lucarini questions the use of contemporary music in the worship of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

30 review for Why I Left The Contemporary Christian Music Movement: Confessions of a Former Worship Leader

  1. 5 out of 5

    Clinton Wilcox

    I'll start off by saying that I'm a classically-trained musician (clarinet and piano), and have participated in and led contemporary worship bands since I was a kid, as well as participating in church choirs and traditional services also since I was a kid. I'm not coming at this as simply a fan of CCM but also as an educated musician. This was a book that was recommended to me by a church musician who opposed CCM in the church, so I've had this book for some time. I read it back then and wasn't I'll start off by saying that I'm a classically-trained musician (clarinet and piano), and have participated in and led contemporary worship bands since I was a kid, as well as participating in church choirs and traditional services also since I was a kid. I'm not coming at this as simply a fan of CCM but also as an educated musician. This was a book that was recommended to me by a church musician who opposed CCM in the church, so I've had this book for some time. I read it back then and wasn't convinced. I re-read it now because I'm going to be participating in a debate on CCM in April so I'm studying the issue to prepare. Now having the benefit of studying logic and philosophy on top of music, I'm even less convinced by Lucarini now. This book is, frankly, very poorly argued and the Biblical exegesis is also very poor. If you are looking for a book to really help you understand the debate and what smart CCM supporters argue (rather than the simplistic treatment that Lucarini gives them in his book), you should probably look elsewhere. One of the major issues with this book is that Lucarini does not provide any studies to bolster his arguments about what pro-CCM people actually believe or say. He relies on his own personal experience and then assumes that all interactions with pro-CCM people are actually the same, and that pro-CCM people all think the same way. This is, of course, a logical fallacy called hasty generalization. We'll need more than Lucarini's individual experiences to convince us he knows what he's talking about. I won't exhaustively critique his book, but I'll give you a few examples of the poor reasoning and poor Scriptural exegesis contained in the book. One of Lucarini's recurring arguments in the book is that we should avoid CCM because it's based in rock music and rock music is associated with pagan practices. The Israelites were severely punished for mixing pagan worship practices in with their own worship practices, so we should refrain from incorporating music based in rock and jazz styles from our services. The problem with this argument, though, is that it proves too much. If Lucarini's argument is correct, then we should refrain from reading in church, because reading (e.g. romance novels) can be associated with pagan practices, and the abundance of sex in rock music is one of Lucarini's issues with rock. Also, we should avoid using music altogether, because music, itself, is also associated with these pagan practices. You don't need a rock beat. There have been sensual/sexual songs written with just piano or guitar, and even full-on rock songs can be scaled down to an acoustic version. So this argument isn't very good in arguing that CCM has no place in the church. Another argument Lucarini makes is that traditional music supporters have some guidelines to follow but contemporary music supporters have none. This is, of course, completely false. I have been to contemporary worship seminars where speakers talk about the kinds of music we should choose for corporate worship and the kinds of music we should avoid, and how a worship band should present themselves on Sunday morning. Lucarini simply makes a slippery slope fallacy by arguing that bringing in contemporary worship will just lead to more and more questionable material from the worship band. Another of Lucarini's arguments is that the beat associated with rock and other rock-like styles just appeals to our flesh and will result in more and more obscene behavior from members of the band. Again, this couldn't be further from the truth. Sometimes thing like this does happen, but it's not a result of the music. In the church I grew up in, the contemporary worship leader ran off with the pastor's wife. That was clearly an immoral thing to do, but Lucarini has a lot more work to do if he wants to prove that CCM was directly responsible for that. After all, I've never ran off with a pastor's wife. We even have a female in our group that sings with us and I have never sexually assaulted her. In fact, despite Lucarini's insistence to the contrary, we even have somewhat of a dress code when we play on Sunday mornings (no shorts or open-toed shoes). Also, Lucarini acknowledges that these sorts of sins can crop up in any environment, but he weasels his way out of the implication by simply saying that CCM specifically creates an atmosphere that *fosters* this behavior, so it's not the same thing. It's not just some free-for-all of debauchery in our services just because we use styles of music that people outside the church also enjoy. An example of Lucarini's poor exegesis: On p. 53, Lucarini writes the following: "That is why every Christian should learn to use a Hebrew and Greek lexicon such as Strong's Concordance. With all the great Bible study books and software, we do not have to become Greek or Hebrew scholars to gain more insight into the words of God." This is actually very bad advice. I have a Strong's Concordance on my bookshelf. But you can't just gain insight into the words of God by looking at one individual word. Lucarini apparently doesn't understand how translation works -- it's as much art as it is a science. You don't just translate individual words, you have to take the words in context. Words often have multiple meanings, as Lucarini even mentions when he tries to translate words, and which meaning is intended depends on the context in which the word appears, just as it does in English. So if you don't know Greek or Hebrew, you are doing the text a disservice by trying to act as translator. Read Exegetical Fallacies by D.A. Carson for more on how poor translation can result in bad theology. Lucarini uses this to his advantage. He writes several ways a word can be translated, and then chooses the translation that works best for his overall idea, not the translation that works best in the context of the passage. One example is on p. 58, in which he argues that 1 Peter 2:17 says that we are to fear God, but we don't really fear God like we used to. Now we think to "fear God" means to respect God. But the word used in the original Greek is *phobos*, which means "to frighten", "to be alarmed", "to be in awe of", "to revere", "to be sore afraid", "to fear exceedingly". Here's the issue: three of those definitions are not about "being in fear of". Phobos can also mean "to be alarmed, "to be in awe of", or "to revere", the last two being a form of respect. So Lucarini has not made his case; in fact, he has also made the case for those he thinks have misunderstood it. The problem is that you won't know which definition Peter had in mind without translating the entire passage, yet Lucarini just uses the definitions that work for his own argument. Lucarini claims to love the believers he disagrees with enough to want to show them the truth. The problem is that at almost every turn, Lucarini is accusing them of lying and being dismissive of the concerns of pro-traditional music supporters. His actions betray his own words. Lucarini also poisons the well many times throughout the book by treading pro-traditional music supporters as kind people who are only trying to preserve their way of life and pro-CCM supporters as these oppressive people who are trying to run the church their way and are responsible for churches splitting up. The problem is that my experience is the exact opposite. The church I grew up in split twice, and once was over music. It wasn't me that led to the split, it was the traditional music leader who didn't want CCM in the church and wanted things ran his way. And when I raised a reasonable question about his intentions at a church meeting, my concern was brushed away and my question all but ignored. Lucarini does not accurately represent anyone in this debate. As I said, this was not an exhaustive discussion of the book. But it should be enough to show that this book does not provide a meaningful contribution to the discussion on contemporary worship music. For that, you should look elsewhere.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    In Why I Left the Contemporary Christian Music Movement, Dan Lucari recounts his immersion in, and abandonment of, the Contemporary Christian Music (CCM) movement. And then he equips us to defend traditional music from CCM promoters and challenges the "Contemporaries" to leave behind the favored, man-centered music of the world and return to God-honoring musical styles. In short but substantive chapters, Lucari answers tough questions such as Isn't music amoral? (partial answer: the general conc In Why I Left the Contemporary Christian Music Movement, Dan Lucari recounts his immersion in, and abandonment of, the Contemporary Christian Music (CCM) movement. And then he equips us to defend traditional music from CCM promoters and challenges the "Contemporaries" to leave behind the favored, man-centered music of the world and return to God-honoring musical styles. In short but substantive chapters, Lucari answers tough questions such as Isn't music amoral? (partial answer: the general concert of music may be amoral, but particular musical styles -- developed by man -- are not), Isn't CCM easier to sing than traditional hymns?, and Isn't God using CCM to save and disciple teens? Lucari also responds to the "show me" challenge: "Show me where the Bible says that rock music is evil." Lucari writes well, is challenging yet humble, and has given us a book worth reading, owning, and sharing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Wilson

    I was so blessed as I read this book! I appreciate the fact that Mr. Lucarini bases his decisions on obedience to the Word of God, in his desire to live a holy and sanctified life that is pleasing to the Lord in all things. It is rare to find a book where the author is so painfully honest about his struggles with such a hot-button issue. Dan Lucarini doesn't just give his own opinion, but liberally uses the Word of God as a basis for his beliefs. I highly recommend this book to anyone who desire I was so blessed as I read this book! I appreciate the fact that Mr. Lucarini bases his decisions on obedience to the Word of God, in his desire to live a holy and sanctified life that is pleasing to the Lord in all things. It is rare to find a book where the author is so painfully honest about his struggles with such a hot-button issue. Dan Lucarini doesn't just give his own opinion, but liberally uses the Word of God as a basis for his beliefs. I highly recommend this book to anyone who desires to live a godly life!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rick Stuckwisch

    This is not a great book. It's not even a good book in many ways. It's poorly written, far too personal (it reads like something of an extended blog post), and theologically legalistic. For all of that, it does offer something of value, in that the author comes out of a deep "contemporary Christian music" and "contemporary worship" background, and he is able to offer an insider's critique behind the scenes. There are some telling insights to be found in that, although nothing startling new. The This is not a great book. It's not even a good book in many ways. It's poorly written, far too personal (it reads like something of an extended blog post), and theologically legalistic. For all of that, it does offer something of value, in that the author comes out of a deep "contemporary Christian music" and "contemporary worship" background, and he is able to offer an insider's critique behind the scenes. There are some telling insights to be found in that, although nothing startling new. The weakness of the book is the author's primary conviction that rock music as a whole, and anything with a rock beat, is not only inappropriate for Christian worship but inherently evil under any and all circumstances. In any case, it's a relatively short book and a fast read. For those interested in the topic, it's worth the effort, however wince-inducing some of the chapters and writing may be.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Rathbun

    I appreciate that the author comes from within the CCM movement; it makes his concerns more compelling to me. I also understand that his background before coming to Christ bring certain associations to his mind when he hears certain styles of music while I, who have never been to a bar or a night club, have no such memories when I hear a particular beat. Of course, his past makes him a weaker brother in this area, and thus biblically requires me to not use songs in his presence that would draw h I appreciate that the author comes from within the CCM movement; it makes his concerns more compelling to me. I also understand that his background before coming to Christ bring certain associations to his mind when he hears certain styles of music while I, who have never been to a bar or a night club, have no such memories when I hear a particular beat. Of course, his past makes him a weaker brother in this area, and thus biblically requires me to not use songs in his presence that would draw him into sinful memories. I too eschew the worldliness in much of the CCM industry, and have long expressed my dislike of the pouting, angry, or sultry appearances of the singers on album covers. "Does that expression look like love, joy, or peace to you?" I'd ask. I've been disgusted by a singer on a local TV station shrieking, "Holy! Holy!" while doing hip thrusts toward the audience. WHAT? Do you even know what the word "holy" means? However, in the end, it does seem to come down to a matter of conscience. I'm glad he agrees that we should use contemporary music (a new song) as well as hymns, as long as it doesn't have CCM influences. This is where it becomes a gray area. He says if you're not sure if a song has a backbeat, email him and he'll tell you. Well, every Christian has the Spirit of God, and I'm not comfortable with setting him up as the arbiter of acceptable Christian music. I wish he had listed some of what he considers acceptable contemporary music to give me an idea of what he thinks fits his citeria (although I understand how an author might not want to be pinned down on this). If his only choices for contemporary music would be Mac Lynch and Ron Hamilton, I would find that disappointing and unnecessarily limiting, but I would know where he's coming from. As it is, he lists several songs near the beginning like "Lord, I Lift Your Name on High" and "Give Thanks." These were songs his congregation first began using. By the end of the book, it's unclear whether he thinks these are acceptable or not. I wish he had come out clearly with a list. He does list what he thinks an acceptable service will have and not have. One thing he doesn't want is a projector with words only. Personally, I like seeing the music in front of me, but if it comes down to not using a song because it's not in our hymnal or having to put words only up on a screen, I'd go with the words! Although our hymnal has 801 hymns, it doesn't have "Great Is Thy Faithfulness," "Victory in Jesus," or "Have Thine Own Way, Lord." I WANT to sing those songs, and if you tell me to just buy different hymnals, I'll tell you that you haven't priced hymnals lately! I also have a problem with how he tends to portray Traditionalists as godly and spiritual while the Contemporaries are worldly and uncaring. It's not that one-sided. I've met many Traditionalists who seem full of hatred, who are NOT "easy to be entreated", and who do not want to be moved out of their complacency. They see any change as a threat. The author doesn't deal with this attitude in his book. To me, these type of people are also worldly because they hide a heart far from God behind a shell of conformity to traditional church practices. Of course, dealing with this was probably outside the realm of this book, but I still found it a bit one-sided. I'll also admit that I'm not a professional musician, so whenever someone says that a certain song is MEANT for guitar, intimating that it should not be sung in church with a piano, I just roll my eyes. I'm a pianist, and I enjoy playing choruses of praise to God and singing along. Maybe someone with a trained ear would say, "That doesn't sound right," but I don't hear any problem with the joyful noise I'm making along with my congregation of 100 or so people. I don't like the exclusivity or snobbery that is sometimes conveyed by the trained musician. I'm actually not sure if I got that impression from this book in particular, but it's something often written by people opposed to CCM so I'm mentioning it here. He says that using hymns is usually safe and sound, and all you have to do with those hymns which are theologically unsound is to use discernment. "Don't throw out the baby with the bathwater," he says. Well, I'm wondering if he does the same thing, throwing out all CCM. Just wondering. I actually might be 95% in agreement with him, but because he doesn't get specific about which contemporary songs are OK, I can't be sure. "Contemporary songs are acceptable, as long as the emphasis is not a syncopated beat, but on melody and harmony," he writes. Honestly, I just wish he'd come out and said, "THESE specific popular songs have a beat which I consider worldly; these others do not." I know it's better sometimes just to present the philosophy and not get specific, but I like examples. One detail that I appreciated was his observation that when he would include Scripture in his messages to other CCM musicians, some would criticize him. He points out that we should be wary of any Christian who does not love the Word. He also follows this by warning us to always use the Bible accurately and not out of context to club other people into agreeing with our opinion. I really agree with this! You cannot be truly worshipping God if you do not revere His Word. One of the things I love about certain praise choruses is that they are taken directly from Scripture. We must be people of the Word!

  6. 5 out of 5

    K.M. Updike

    Dan Lucarini, a former Contemporary Christian Music leader, gives an amazing testimony in his book. He gives clear, down to earth, Biblically based arguments and verses that clearly show us what God thinks of our worship music in the church and of our spiritual lives. Although, you cannot by any means "find" in the word of God "Do not use this or this kind of music in your church, Dan Lucarini points out that you CANNOT fit CCM into the Bible. But if you fit the Bible into the CCM, you will not Dan Lucarini, a former Contemporary Christian Music leader, gives an amazing testimony in his book. He gives clear, down to earth, Biblically based arguments and verses that clearly show us what God thinks of our worship music in the church and of our spiritual lives. Although, you cannot by any means "find" in the word of God "Do not use this or this kind of music in your church, Dan Lucarini points out that you CANNOT fit CCM into the Bible. But if you fit the Bible into the CCM, you will not be able to find it there. God says clearly in His Word what is acceptable in His sight and what is not. Dan explains every side of the contemporaries arguments and gives full view of their beliefs. Plus, he gives detailed explanations and verses from God's word to back up His beliefs. Mr.Lucarini also approaches the belief that "God accepts us for who we are" and the "come as you are", and the "it's the heart of worship that matters". He explains clearly and definitely what the true heart of worship really is. If you are truly seeking to honor God with your whole entire BEING, with everything you do, I urge you, CCM promoters or no, to read this for yourself and find out exactly what God's word has to say about your life and how to please God ultimately.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chloe (aka Crystal)

    I read this because I've been trying to understand what's wrong with ccm (christian contemporary music). I have family members that don't and won't use ccm in their church for worship, listen to it, and have nothing to do with it at all! (Their church uses hymns for worship.) I wanted to understand why they made this decision, so a pastor lent me this book to read while I was out of town. This book had a lot of good pointers, but I'm still struggling to understand. I agree that ccm should not be u I read this because I've been trying to understand what's wrong with ccm (christian contemporary music). I have family members that don't and won't use ccm in their church for worship, listen to it, and have nothing to do with it at all! (Their church uses hymns for worship.) I wanted to understand why they made this decision, so a pastor lent me this book to read while I was out of town. This book had a lot of good pointers, but I'm still struggling to understand. I agree that ccm should not be used in church for worship, but I don't see anything wrong with listening to ccm on the radio (as long as it is not rock, heavy metal, etc). When I'm discouraged, and I'm listening to the radio, there's that song that just comes on the radio that I really needed, such as For King and Country's 'Priceless' I'm thinking about what was said in the book, and praying I'll be a godly young woman for the Lord.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Everett Ender

    I read it because I am a contemporary worship leader and because it was endorsed by Ligon Duncan, a scholar who I admire for being true to scripture. This book was a wonderful practice in eisegesis and false interpretation. If you read the Bible in context, there's just no way to arrive at the conclusions that the author does. He basically intends to convince church leaders to do away with any instrument except for organ and piano during their congregational meetings. This poses a big question. W I read it because I am a contemporary worship leader and because it was endorsed by Ligon Duncan, a scholar who I admire for being true to scripture. This book was a wonderful practice in eisegesis and false interpretation. If you read the Bible in context, there's just no way to arrive at the conclusions that the author does. He basically intends to convince church leaders to do away with any instrument except for organ and piano during their congregational meetings. This poses a big question. Why does he seek to outlaw those instruments that are clearly mentioned in scripture (horns, drums, lyres...), while simultaneously justifying the use of instruments that aren't (piano, organ)? Because he is simply trying to push the agenda of his denomination. This is an older book and I think that Ligon Duncan's beliefs have changed a bit since the time it was written.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Read1000books

    Another book that every Christian in America should take the time to read. Christians were sold a bill of goods when they allowed contemporary music into the church. Find out what the problem is in this excellent book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wesley Kavanagh

    Great book. Must read for every pastor.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Holler

    As someone who has always enjoyed Contemporary Christian Music (CCM), this book had some great, eye-opening concepts! He does tend to lump people together, traditionalists as kind & holy; contemporaries as dismissive & misleading. I definitely understand why people can get frustrated by the groupings, because there are exceptions on both sides. Lucarini’s honest explanation of what is happening in SO MANY CHURCHES is heartfelt, encouraging, & has the potential to transform worship in churches. Ho As someone who has always enjoyed Contemporary Christian Music (CCM), this book had some great, eye-opening concepts! He does tend to lump people together, traditionalists as kind & holy; contemporaries as dismissive & misleading. I definitely understand why people can get frustrated by the groupings, because there are exceptions on both sides. Lucarini’s honest explanation of what is happening in SO MANY CHURCHES is heartfelt, encouraging, & has the potential to transform worship in churches. However, a young millennial, I can say that, thought I’m not a music minister, I have experienced MANY of the same attitudes from contemporaries that Lucarini has. I truly believe all Christians need to continually examine their beliefs, attitudes, and implementation of worship!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marques

    Someone recommended that I read this book several years ago. I didn’t believe that CCM was wrong before I read this book, and after seeing the flawed logic of the author, I was even less convinced afterwards. The only reason I would recommend anyone read this book is if you want to see the poor logic behind this belief system. It helped me see this, hence the extra star :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stanley Jebb

    An important book for church life, and worship leaders in particular.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Maulucci

    worth reading.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Briana

    Well...I can tell that Dan Lucarini definitely means well in his confessions. He wants nothing but the best for Christians and the Church. I commend him for being willing to take a stand for his convictions. However...I very much dislike the division of Christians over non-doctrinal issues. Sure, there are definitely churches out there that abuse the idea of worship and turn it into feel-good entertainment. And of course, there are plenty of Christians who are too willing to bend standards to ca Well...I can tell that Dan Lucarini definitely means well in his confessions. He wants nothing but the best for Christians and the Church. I commend him for being willing to take a stand for his convictions. However...I very much dislike the division of Christians over non-doctrinal issues. Sure, there are definitely churches out there that abuse the idea of worship and turn it into feel-good entertainment. And of course, there are plenty of Christians who are too willing to bend standards to cater to popular demands. But...to judge all forms of contemporary music guilty merely by association? To generalize and say that the acceptance of Contemporary Christian Music automatically means bowing to the whims of the worshippers? To demand the return to hymns as the best and truest form of worship? I just don't think Lucarini is in a position to judge all churches, all Christians, and all musical presentations. Because it is an art form, music will be perceived differently by different people. Not *everyone* thinks of sex and drugs when rock music comes on. My goodness, you might as well agree to ban the b diminished chord, because it sounds perverse and unnatural or something... In all seriousness...there are probably Christians who will be led astray by contemporary music. There are, however, plenty who will not. And in regards to music and all other areas of life, Christians need to stay united by Christ, whether they are in favor of traditional or contemporary music. The point of worship is not the music, whether traditional or contemporary. Worship is about glorifying God and putting Him first. I think Lucarini puts forth a very convincing argument for why he must leave the Contemporary Christian music movement. I'm not convinced or supportive of his claims that contemporary Christian music is inherently wrong. (But hey, this book was completely worth it for ONE DOLLAR!! Here's to used curriculum sales! I love good, cheap finds...)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    Why I Left The Contemporary Christian Music Movement: Confessions of a former worship leader I was a little apprehensive about reading this book because it's such a hot button topic now a days. I didn't really know what to expect. CCM is something I never really liked even before I knew what a Praise and Worship service was. (And, indeed, I didn't know until I read this book and began to research it a little on my own.) So, I think my perspective is fairly fresh and objective. I have no reason to Why I Left The Contemporary Christian Music Movement: Confessions of a former worship leader I was a little apprehensive about reading this book because it's such a hot button topic now a days. I didn't really know what to expect. CCM is something I never really liked even before I knew what a Praise and Worship service was. (And, indeed, I didn't know until I read this book and began to research it a little on my own.) So, I think my perspective is fairly fresh and objective. I have no reason to doubt anything Lucarini says in this book and I can't even really say I'm surprised at the real life situations laid out in therein. I don't agree with everything Lucarini says, in that because he's come to fear his own vulnerabilities (with good reason) he tends to project them onto everyone else. But, it's done so out of love. In fact, this whole book is done with the utmost respect and love to all Christians. I think it should be read by everyone because I think that there's a lot of truth in it. It's even a voice of reason. Everyone who is mature in their faith should be able to put their emotions aside long enough to read this book and judge for themselves.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ruth E. R.

    Interesting perspective from 2002. I disliked the so-called contemporary style for the same reason I dislike pop music: it lacks meaning and beauty. I do believe that as of July 2016, a lot of the "contemporary" praise songs have improved in meaning as well as beauty, though they continue to often be difficult to sing along with or to remember after the band goes home. My niece couldn't remember any of the "songs" she learned all week at Praise Camp because she didn't take the band home with her Interesting perspective from 2002. I disliked the so-called contemporary style for the same reason I dislike pop music: it lacks meaning and beauty. I do believe that as of July 2016, a lot of the "contemporary" praise songs have improved in meaning as well as beauty, though they continue to often be difficult to sing along with or to remember after the band goes home. My niece couldn't remember any of the "songs" she learned all week at Praise Camp because she didn't take the band home with her. Pop music is odd in that it is extremely simple musically, yet challenging to sing and recall later due to the style. I must also remark that this book was published before the Getty/Townend phenomenon of "modern hymn" writing and the revival of hymns by thirty- and fortysomething vocalists who grew up on hymns.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    A challenging look at contemporary music trends in the church today. A logically developed argument against the seeker-sensitive movement which raises personally uplifting emotional 'worship'experience over and above God-centred worship which lifts up God and reminds us to approach our maker and saviour with awe and humility. Some great points are made about how we approach music as a part of our worship service.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carla

    Very interesting perspective from a man who was instrumental in his church making the change from traditional church music to the contemporary. Lucarini discusses many aspects of the divide and knows both sides of the issue. This is a huge problem in the modern church and I really appreciated what he wrote. Those of us who spend most of the CC song service repenting for how we feel about the music are not alone! I've read this one twice.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mitch Nichols

    This review on the Artistic Theologian captures the basic shortcomings of this book. Unconvincing and weak arguments. http://www.artistictheologian.com/ind... This review on the Artistic Theologian captures the basic shortcomings of this book. Unconvincing and weak arguments. http://www.artistictheologian.com/ind...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Carlson

    Good points rather rabidly made.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paul,

    Lots of holes. But at least he brings up the issue.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    0067

  24. 5 out of 5

    Suldac Otniel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robert Sierk

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kat

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carol Richardson

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