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One of Horn Book's Best Picture Books of 2011 When Pa brings a turkey poult home to fatten for Christmas dinner, he assures Ma that it will be no trouble since it can live in a box by the stove and eat table scraps--and just think of the money we'll save! But it's not quite so simple to raise a turkey in a tiny flat in a nineteenth-century New York City tenement. Can Pa and One of Horn Book's Best Picture Books of 2011 When Pa brings a turkey poult home to fatten for Christmas dinner, he assures Ma that it will be no trouble since it can live in a box by the stove and eat table scraps--and just think of the money we'll save! But it's not quite so simple to raise a turkey in a tiny flat in a nineteenth-century New York City tenement. Can Pa and the children manage the willful and growing Alfred and keep the neighbors happy until Christmas? Pa finds a solution for every difficulty--until he encounters one that threatens to ruin Christmas completely. How the family joins together to solve this last difficulty makes for a very funny and satisfying holiday story.


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One of Horn Book's Best Picture Books of 2011 When Pa brings a turkey poult home to fatten for Christmas dinner, he assures Ma that it will be no trouble since it can live in a box by the stove and eat table scraps--and just think of the money we'll save! But it's not quite so simple to raise a turkey in a tiny flat in a nineteenth-century New York City tenement. Can Pa and One of Horn Book's Best Picture Books of 2011 When Pa brings a turkey poult home to fatten for Christmas dinner, he assures Ma that it will be no trouble since it can live in a box by the stove and eat table scraps--and just think of the money we'll save! But it's not quite so simple to raise a turkey in a tiny flat in a nineteenth-century New York City tenement. Can Pa and the children manage the willful and growing Alfred and keep the neighbors happy until Christmas? Pa finds a solution for every difficulty--until he encounters one that threatens to ruin Christmas completely. How the family joins together to solve this last difficulty makes for a very funny and satisfying holiday story.

30 review for The Money We'll Save

  1. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    This isn’t the most uplifting story. This is about a poor family and the father is talked into buying a turkey for the holidays and fatten it up to save money. It costs them a lot of money along the way and the family gets attached to the bird, even thought it’s a horrible mess and nuisance, and they don’t want to eat it. They saved no money and didn’t have anything for dinner. The artwork has a sense of chaos and haggardness. It’s not a world most kids want to visit. Our kids did not like this. This isn’t the most uplifting story. This is about a poor family and the father is talked into buying a turkey for the holidays and fatten it up to save money. It costs them a lot of money along the way and the family gets attached to the bird, even thought it’s a horrible mess and nuisance, and they don’t want to eat it. They saved no money and didn’t have anything for dinner. The artwork has a sense of chaos and haggardness. It’s not a world most kids want to visit. Our kids did not like this. The niece said the artwork was messy and she gave this 1 star. The nephew thought it would be fun to live with a turkey in the house (of course he does, someone to make a mess with him) but he didn’t like the story and gave it 2 stars. I wasn’t impressed with the story or the message. The message is ok - “We have each other and that’s the important thing” but it’s about hard knocks in life and living with poor choices. It’s a little depressing to me. Our family did not find the humor in this.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David

    The Money We'll Save by Brock Cole follows the attempt by Pa to save money for Christmas by bringing home a young turkey to fatten up for Christmas dinner. Set in a 19th century New York City tenement, this humorous family story finds Pa buying a young turkey when sent out by busy Ma to the market. Fed table scraps, the turkey soon outgrows its box, gets into everything, and makes stinky messes in the apartment. Keeping the turkey on the fire escape or suspending it in a pen don't work. When it' The Money We'll Save by Brock Cole follows the attempt by Pa to save money for Christmas by bringing home a young turkey to fatten up for Christmas dinner. Set in a 19th century New York City tenement, this humorous family story finds Pa buying a young turkey when sent out by busy Ma to the market. Fed table scraps, the turkey soon outgrows its box, gets into everything, and makes stinky messes in the apartment. Keeping the turkey on the fire escape or suspending it in a pen don't work. When it's Christmas the four children refuse to have Alfred the turkey killed, but Pa finally comes up with a solution. The text features lots of dialog, colorful language, and plenty of humor. Life in a tentament is desribed with an emphasis on family, hard work and frugality, with humorous exaggeration. The phrase 'think of the money we'll save" is repeated frequently. Cole's ink and watercolor illustrations nicely portray life in a tentatment, with the endpapers a typical view of that life. My favorite images include the front and back covers, Pa at the market, children feeding Alfred table scraps, Alfred stealing baby Arthur's biscuit, Mrs. Schumaker complaining, Alfred in the pen on the clothesline, Alfred in front of the privy, and the final image. I found this amusing, though exaggerated. I think my expectations were overly high after reading lots of buzz over this. I did enjoy Cole's illustrations. For ages 4 and up, holidays, frugality, Christmas, tenements, humor, families, and fans of Brock Cole.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    When a nineteenth-century New York City tenement family struggling to make ends meet dreams of a wonderful Christmas, Pa takes matters into his own hands and buys a young turkey to grow into their Christmas turkey. He soothes his shocked and somewhat disgruntled wife by telling her to think of the money they would save, fattening up the turkey with table scraps vs. spending all that money on a turkey come Christmas time. But, things go awry as the turkey wreaks havoc around the apartments and go When a nineteenth-century New York City tenement family struggling to make ends meet dreams of a wonderful Christmas, Pa takes matters into his own hands and buys a young turkey to grow into their Christmas turkey. He soothes his shocked and somewhat disgruntled wife by telling her to think of the money they would save, fattening up the turkey with table scraps vs. spending all that money on a turkey come Christmas time. But, things go awry as the turkey wreaks havoc around the apartments and gobbles his way into the family's affections. As the turkey becomes practically another member of the family, it seems impossible that the family will actually kill and eat him for Christmas. And, thankfully, they do not. While there is not an overt message about vegetarianism/veganism, I do think this book would be appealing to veg*n families, and might bring up questions in non-veg*n children about why we eat animals. All in all, I'm not sure I loved this as much as I hoped to. It was just a bit too over-the-top in some places. But, I did really enjoy it, appreciated the message, and got a good chuckle out of the ending.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    Richie's Picks: THE MONEY WE'LL SAVE by Brock Cole, Farrar Straus Giroux, October 2011, 40p., ISBN: 978-0-374-35011-6 All of the children are constructively engaged in their assigned tasks so... "So Ma decided to send Pa. "'Now just buy two eggs and a half pound of flour,' she told him. "'Remember, Christmas is not far off, and we must save every penny.' "'I'll remember,' said Pa, and he set off with a shopping basket and purse." Back in the seventies, at a time when many of us became engaged in t Richie's Picks: THE MONEY WE'LL SAVE by Brock Cole, Farrar Straus Giroux, October 2011, 40p., ISBN: 978-0-374-35011-6 All of the children are constructively engaged in their assigned tasks so... "So Ma decided to send Pa. "'Now just buy two eggs and a half pound of flour,' she told him. "'Remember, Christmas is not far off, and we must save every penny.' "'I'll remember,' said Pa, and he set off with a shopping basket and purse." Back in the seventies, at a time when many of us became engaged in that era's Back-to-the-Land movement (Do you remember THE WHOLE EARTH CATALOGUE and THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS?), there was a really funny BBC sitcom import titled "The Good Life" (known here in the States as "Good Neighbors"). In that show, a couple transform their previously manicured, proper suburban home into a farm, complete with a goat, a pig, fowl, and crops. It is funny to see farm animals in an un-farm like neighborhood. Back in the nineties, Anne Miranda and Janet Stevens' TO MARKET, TO MARKET was a big hit in this house. It is funny to have farm animals running around in the house. Back in the fifties, the book that arguably is the most beloved children's novel ever written explored the notion of eating a farm animal that has become a member of the family. I'm reminded of all of these experiences by the uproariously funny THE MONEY WE'LL SAVE, the latest addition to my all-time favorite children's Christmas stories. "'Oh,' said the chicken man,' if it's a fine dinner and saving pennies you want, I can tell you how to do that.'" And so it is that Pa arrives home from the market, to the family's already-crowded upstairs flat, in a New York tenement building, with a turkey poult -- who the children name Alfred -- that they will fatten up between now and Christmas. As the living situation requiring the accommodation of the rapidly growing turkey becomes more and more absurd (and expensive), the punch line, again and again, is: "...and remember the money we're saving." What elevates this story to the truly notable are Brock Cole's engaging illustrations that are filled with life and movement and character. The ink and watercolor illustrations both depict nineteenth century tenement living and clearly define each of the six tight-knit family members (and their repeatedly irritated elderly neighbor, Mrs. Schumacher). Raising Alfred is a wild adventure. And though there is turkey crap raining down everywhere, the family sticks together and -- right -- like anyone thought they could actually eat Alfred... "'It would be like eating a friend,' said Bridget. "'Well,' said Pearl, 'not a friend, exactly. It would be like eating Mrs. Schumacher.' "'Yes!' shouted Bailey and Bridget. 'Do you want us to eat Mrs. Schumacher for Christmas dinner?'" The surprise ending had me rolling. Don't miss it. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.com [email protected] Moderator http://groups.yahoo.com/group/middle_... http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/people/facult...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    Brock Cole's illustrations can be quite surprising. While his drawings of people are most definitely simple in form, with movement and facial expressions that rate toward the rudimentary end of the spectrum, his rendering of routine scenery is often splendidly detailed and imaginative. A great example of this is the illustrations on the inside covers of The Money We'll Save, of laundry being hung between apartment fire escapes. This may have been a routine sight for apartment dwellers of the tim Brock Cole's illustrations can be quite surprising. While his drawings of people are most definitely simple in form, with movement and facial expressions that rate toward the rudimentary end of the spectrum, his rendering of routine scenery is often splendidly detailed and imaginative. A great example of this is the illustrations on the inside covers of The Money We'll Save, of laundry being hung between apartment fire escapes. This may have been a routine sight for apartment dwellers of the time when the story is set, but Brock Cole's interpretation of the scene hints at a subtle romance behind it all, the energy and quiet warmth of regular families going about their business as usual, leading ordinary lives while trying to stay afloat financially in difficult economic times and loving each other through any situation that might arise. This is where Brock Cole's work has its main impact, the imparting of this feeling of old-fashioned resolve and togetherness, and it's why I liked the story. Money can be tight for any family with four children, but especially in New York City, and even more so around the Christmas season. When Ma gives Pa careful instructions as to how he should carry out the family's grocery shopping so they'll have enough money left for Christmas dinner, a shrewd merchant sees his chance to convince Pa to purchase a live turkey. After all, what better way to save money for the Christmas meal than by purchasing it unprocessed and taking care of all the prep work themselves? A live turkey, however, is much more of a vexation to have around the house than Pa had anticipated. The family spends most of its meager treasury building new temporary pens for the animal and moving it from place to place whenever the neighbors complain about the noise and smell, but it's when the kids name their new bird boarder "Alfred" that we get a pretty clear indicator there isn't going to end up being any turkey for dinner. Who wants to eat a bird one has actually named? Having spent most of their money on necessary adjustments for housing Alfred, though, and with no turkey dinner to be had out of it, the family is at a loss for their Christmas meal. Can they salvage a holiday to remember from table scraps, a few basic decorations and a small gift for each child, now that all their big plans for a sumptuous Christmas feast have evaporated? This is a nice story for the Christmas season, emphasizing the importance of family over possessions, as well as the idea that it's the love behind the giving and receiving of Christmas gifts that makes the whole experience so memorable and nice. I would give one and a half stars to The Money We'll Save, and I'm sure it will do its part for many years to help brighten up the Christmases of children everywhere who love the holiday.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    The Money We’ll Save by Brock Cole is a fictional story set in 19th century New York City. In this story, Pa goes to the market and Ma reminds him that “we must save every penny” because Christmas is coming. Pa gets an idea at the market and decides to bring home a turkey. His plan is to save money at Christmas by raising the turkey and then using it for their Christmas dinner. As the story continues the reader sees the family discover that Pa’s plan isn’t so simple. The turkey causes all kinds The Money We’ll Save by Brock Cole is a fictional story set in 19th century New York City. In this story, Pa goes to the market and Ma reminds him that “we must save every penny” because Christmas is coming. Pa gets an idea at the market and decides to bring home a turkey. His plan is to save money at Christmas by raising the turkey and then using it for their Christmas dinner. As the story continues the reader sees the family discover that Pa’s plan isn’t so simple. The turkey causes all kinds of problems in the family’s apartment and the neighbors are not pleased with the situation either. Throughout the book, everytime Ma is exasperated with the situation, Pa reminds her “Think of the money we’ll save.” This historical fiction picture book is recommended by Children’s Books in Children’s Hands 5th ed. Written and illustrated by Brock Cole, many of the historical details are in the illustration. The illustrations show what living in 19th century New York City may have been like. Some of the historical details included are the family with a washboard and bucket in the kitchen for washing clothes, clothes hanging on a clothesline to dry, and one of the children in the book having a bath in a bucket in the kitchen. This book presents some vocabulary from the time period that students may not been familiar with such as privies and parlor, however, the illustrations give context clues to understand most of the unfamiliar words. Although this book takes place in the past, children could make connections to family life and the idea of a family needing to save money and make choices about how money is spent. This book could also be used for students to compare modern family life with that of the past. This humorous book would be enjoyed by children in grades K-3.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Pa brings home a little turkey baby, assuring Ma that this will save the family money in the difficult times of a nineteenth century New York tenement building. But will the turkey save the family money, when he messes up the ironing and steals the baby’s biscuits? “There were so many complaints and so much extra washing that when Pa and the children caught Alfred there was nothing to do but bring him back into the flat. ‘It’s just for a few days, now,’ Pa explained to Ma. ‘And that idea you had a Pa brings home a little turkey baby, assuring Ma that this will save the family money in the difficult times of a nineteenth century New York tenement building. But will the turkey save the family money, when he messes up the ironing and steals the baby’s biscuits? “There were so many complaints and so much extra washing that when Pa and the children caught Alfred there was nothing to do but bring him back into the flat. ‘It’s just for a few days, now,’ Pa explained to Ma. ‘And that idea you had about the bedroom was a good one. We’ll move all the beds into the kitchen and the parlor and give the bedroom to the bird. That way he won’t be a bother, and remember the money we’re saving.’”

  8. 5 out of 5

    babyhippoface

    In an attempt to save money for Christmas, Papa buys a young turkey with the intention of fattening it up for Christmas dinner. Unfortunately, there isn't really room inside a nineteenth-century tenement flat to raise a turkey. The smell is bad, the noise is bad, and the mess is bad. Papa tries all sorts of remedies--build the bird a pen, move the pen to the fire escape, hang the pen over the alley privies by the clothesline--but every remedy fails, and every remedy costs him more money. The phr In an attempt to save money for Christmas, Papa buys a young turkey with the intention of fattening it up for Christmas dinner. Unfortunately, there isn't really room inside a nineteenth-century tenement flat to raise a turkey. The smell is bad, the noise is bad, and the mess is bad. Papa tries all sorts of remedies--build the bird a pen, move the pen to the fire escape, hang the pen over the alley privies by the clothesline--but every remedy fails, and every remedy costs him more money. The phrase, "just think of the money we'll save," becomes quite the joke by the time Christmas arrives. This is funny enough to be a good read-aloud for upper elementary kids, and would provide a nice change of pace from the more common Santa stories.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Arminzerella

    In an effort to save money for Christmas, Pa buys a young turkey to fatten up for Christmas dinner. Alfred the turkey quickly outgrows the box next to the stove, and his appetite for food (and destruction) knows no bounds! The family moves him first to the fire escape, then to the clothesline, and finally to their bedroom, enduring constant complaining from the neighbors and Alfred himself. When it's finally time to butcher Alfred, the children are aghast. They can't EAT Alfred. Instead, they tu In an effort to save money for Christmas, Pa buys a young turkey to fatten up for Christmas dinner. Alfred the turkey quickly outgrows the box next to the stove, and his appetite for food (and destruction) knows no bounds! The family moves him first to the fire escape, then to the clothesline, and finally to their bedroom, enduring constant complaining from the neighbors and Alfred himself. When it's finally time to butcher Alfred, the children are aghast. They can't EAT Alfred. Instead, they tuck into a simple meal of oatmeal and brown sugar and send Alfred to live with their cantankerous elderly neighbor, Mrs. Schumacher, who, despite her complaints previously was "...very pleased. She was a widow and, when all was said and done, she was glad of the company. What with his messes and eating everything in sight, Alfred reminded her not a little of the late Mr. Schumacher." I rather fell in love with this when Mrs. Schumacher opened up her home and her heart to Alfred. Unfortunately, this isn't a good storytime candidate - it would probably work better sharing one on one. Funny and perfect for the holidays.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    When Ma is forced to send Pa to the store for eggs and flour, she warns him to just buy those two items. But Pa is talked into purchasing a turkey poult at the market because of the money he’ll save. They plan on having the turkey for Christmas dinner after feeding it on scraps and letting it live in a box by the stove. But their nineteenth century apartment was definitely not designed to raise poultry. Alfred, the turkey, grew and grew and soon started to eat much more than table scraps. The fa When Ma is forced to send Pa to the store for eggs and flour, she warns him to just buy those two items. But Pa is talked into purchasing a turkey poult at the market because of the money he’ll save. They plan on having the turkey for Christmas dinner after feeding it on scraps and letting it live in a box by the stove. But their nineteenth century apartment was definitely not designed to raise poultry. Alfred, the turkey, grew and grew and soon started to eat much more than table scraps. The family started to get creative with where they could house Alfred but there wasn’t much they could do with the limited space. As Christmas neared, the mess and stink of a turkey was getting to be too much. Though he may be messy, the children started to love Alfred. What happened when Alfred became more of a pet than a meal? The setting here is brilliantly done. The depiction of the tenement building, the attitudes of the hard-working family, and the frugality of their family life all are vividly depicted. The 19th century time period works well for a Christmas story, one that focuses more on family than on expense and presents. This is an old-fashioned Christmas tale with lots of heart and character. Cole’s art also captures the day-to-day life of this family. The clothes and home immediately let readers know that they are not reading about today. The illustrations are a jumble of family life, turkey mess, and a small space packed with furniture. The illustrations have a real heart to them, filled with familial love and busyness. Highly recommended, this book is a great one to add to Christmas traditions. It is sure to have smiles beaming from all ages and will inspire the sharing of your family’s holiday memories. Add this one to Christmas story times too as a break from Santa Claus and presents. Appropriate for ages 4-6.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    As time for the holidays are approaching, the family in this picture book set in a nineteenth century New York tenement is trying to pinch pennies so they can have a feast. While running errands for his wife, the father comes home with a young turkey that he plans to raise for their Christmas dinner. It can live in a box by the stove and eat table scraps. But the best laid plans of mice and men don't always work out as they plan, and the turkey essentially takes over the house. Some of the fathe As time for the holidays are approaching, the family in this picture book set in a nineteenth century New York tenement is trying to pinch pennies so they can have a feast. While running errands for his wife, the father comes home with a young turkey that he plans to raise for their Christmas dinner. It can live in a box by the stove and eat table scraps. But the best laid plans of mice and men don't always work out as they plan, and the turkey essentially takes over the house. Some of the father's solutions for the bird are innovative and some are hilarious; for instance, he builds a turkey pen and attaches it to the clothes line so they turkey can be wheeled in and out, and he moves the family into the kitchen so the bird can have the bedroom to itself. When time comes for the bird to be cooked, the children refuse to let him be killed, forcing the family to come up with a better solution. While this title is filled with all sorts of humor, it also provides a glimpse into life during that particular time period, establishing the setting perfectly with spot-on description and watercolor illustrations that show the personalities of the family's long-suffering neighbors.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katie Krimmel

    The book The Money We’ll Save, is about a sweet family who is trying to save every penny for Christmas. The Father thinks that by buying a turkey to fatten up on their own for Christmas dinner will help with saving some of those pennies. Well, Alfred, the turkey, causes some trouble around the apartment complex. It’s a must read to find out what it would be like to live with a turkey, and if the family does end up eating him for Christmas dinner. I would recommend this book for first through fou The book The Money We’ll Save, is about a sweet family who is trying to save every penny for Christmas. The Father thinks that by buying a turkey to fatten up on their own for Christmas dinner will help with saving some of those pennies. Well, Alfred, the turkey, causes some trouble around the apartment complex. It’s a must read to find out what it would be like to live with a turkey, and if the family does end up eating him for Christmas dinner. I would recommend this book for first through fourth grade. It’s not only fun to see the trouble this turkey gives the family but also a fun holiday read. The illustrations are done in what looks like water color giving them a different old fashioned appearance. This helps because the family is depicted in an early twentieth period style dress. Great activities for this book would be to have children come up with ways to save money, or what they think it would be like to live with a turkey. Cole, B. (2011). The money we'll save. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    I was a little put off by the “clueless dad” trope the book uses, but the rest of the book is so hilarious I’ll give it a pass. Rule Number One of farm life is Never Name Your Food. However, our main characters live in New York City, and when they name the young turkey Pa brings home to fatten up on table scraps for Christmas (think of the money we’ll save!) it’s all hilariously downhill from there. My favorite bit was the neighbor downstairs coming up three times a day – once to complain about t I was a little put off by the “clueless dad” trope the book uses, but the rest of the book is so hilarious I’ll give it a pass. Rule Number One of farm life is Never Name Your Food. However, our main characters live in New York City, and when they name the young turkey Pa brings home to fatten up on table scraps for Christmas (think of the money we’ll save!) it’s all hilariously downhill from there. My favorite bit was the neighbor downstairs coming up three times a day – once to complain about the noise, once to complain about the smell, and a third time to complain about how hard it was at her age to climb stairs three times a day at her age. The old woman, drinking a cup of tea, comfortably complaining to Ma, surrounded by domestic chaos, had me laughing out loud. A fun solution is used to solve the problem of what to do after the children declare eating Alfred the bird would be like eating a friend. A fun holiday tale any time of the year.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Brock Coles' distinct water color illustrations accompany hilarious text about a family and a turkey. Ma sends Pa to the market to pick up 2 eggs and 1/2 lb. of flour. That's it. No more. Well, when Pa comes back he has a turkey. He insists in can live in a box next to the stove and eat table scraps. Think of the money they'll save, he says. But the turkey gets bigger and meaner. He starts to steal food from others in the house. He becomes smelly and noisy and the neighbors start to complain. Pa Brock Coles' distinct water color illustrations accompany hilarious text about a family and a turkey. Ma sends Pa to the market to pick up 2 eggs and 1/2 lb. of flour. That's it. No more. Well, when Pa comes back he has a turkey. He insists in can live in a box next to the stove and eat table scraps. Think of the money they'll save, he says. But the turkey gets bigger and meaner. He starts to steal food from others in the house. He becomes smelly and noisy and the neighbors start to complain. Pa keeps moving the turkey until, finally, the day before Christmas arrives and he plans to take the turkey to the butchers. However, when the kids hear that the turkey is going to the butchers they immediately argue that of course he's not going. How could they eat a member of the family? A grumpy member, but still... They find a solution that is quite humorous.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Randie D. Camp, M.S.

    The story takes place in 19th century New York. A rather large family is living in an apartment flat. Ma and the children are very busy with chores so Pa is sent out to buy flour and eggs. Christmas is coming up, so Ma reminds him not to spend an extra penny. But as all loyal husbands do...Pa disobeys and buys a young turkey in hopes of saving the family money. The turkey is not favored by their neighborhoods and he soon becomes costly. The family gets creative in finding a solution that pleases The story takes place in 19th century New York. A rather large family is living in an apartment flat. Ma and the children are very busy with chores so Pa is sent out to buy flour and eggs. Christmas is coming up, so Ma reminds him not to spend an extra penny. But as all loyal husbands do...Pa disobeys and buys a young turkey in hopes of saving the family money. The turkey is not favored by their neighborhoods and he soon becomes costly. The family gets creative in finding a solution that pleases all. I appreciated the illustrations and I imagine they are an accurate depiction of the time period. I recommend this book for anyone looking for a Christmas story that isn't overly cheesy or didactic.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Susie

    I requested this once I saw it was included on an SLJ Newbery prediction post. Yes, they said this was a flyer and would surprise people by its inclusion. Yup, it surprised me. The story is not that original, and I found the illustrations somewhat distracting. It is definitely a departure from The Goats, one of Cole's novels. A family struggles with providing for the family as Christmas approaches. Pa goes to the store for eggs and flour and comes back with a live turkey as well, planning to ser I requested this once I saw it was included on an SLJ Newbery prediction post. Yes, they said this was a flyer and would surprise people by its inclusion. Yup, it surprised me. The story is not that original, and I found the illustrations somewhat distracting. It is definitely a departure from The Goats, one of Cole's novels. A family struggles with providing for the family as Christmas approaches. Pa goes to the store for eggs and flour and comes back with a live turkey as well, planning to serve it for Christmas dinner. Keeping the turkey is not that simple, with some ensuing mayhem. Students may be surprised and ask questions about what a privy is.

  17. 4 out of 5

    RLL220 Kendra

    The Money We'll Save was an interesting book. It had me on the edge for a second. I was thrown off when he brought the turkey home. I wasn't sure if he would really kill Alfred and eat him for Christmas dinner. I think pa did a very great deed by giving him to his neighbor for Christmas. Even though they didn't have much for Christmas dinner but oatmeal and one gift per child they still managed to have a great Christmas. I think the moral of the story is to teach us and young children the value The Money We'll Save was an interesting book. It had me on the edge for a second. I was thrown off when he brought the turkey home. I wasn't sure if he would really kill Alfred and eat him for Christmas dinner. I think pa did a very great deed by giving him to his neighbor for Christmas. Even though they didn't have much for Christmas dinner but oatmeal and one gift per child they still managed to have a great Christmas. I think the moral of the story is to teach us and young children the value of family and sticking together. The illustration of this book was very vivid and had kind of an old town them to it. It fits the story itself.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    This fun picture book teaches young readers that sometimes saving a little money can come at quite a price. The story is set in a nineteenth century apartment building, so you might need to explain certain aspects of the times, like what a privy is. Pa brings home a young turkey to fatten up in order to save money on the family’s Christmas dinner. Of course all sorts of problems follow and readers will certainly wonder if it’s worth it. This might be a good book to illustrate conflict and resolu This fun picture book teaches young readers that sometimes saving a little money can come at quite a price. The story is set in a nineteenth century apartment building, so you might need to explain certain aspects of the times, like what a privy is. Pa brings home a young turkey to fatten up in order to save money on the family’s Christmas dinner. Of course all sorts of problems follow and readers will certainly wonder if it’s worth it. This might be a good book to illustrate conflict and resolution in stories. This book is a lot like the Thanksgiving picture book, Not This Turkey by Jessica Steinberg.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alissa Faust

    A clever Christmas story where the mother sends the father to the store to with very specific instructions. The father comes home with the things on the list and...a turkey. He keeps emphasizing the money they will save since they can use it for their Christmas dinner. We laughed at the trouble this silly turkey caused and yet the family was so attached they could not use him for their dinner. Usually children's stories are fairly predictable, but I never would have guessed this ending! Very det A clever Christmas story where the mother sends the father to the store to with very specific instructions. The father comes home with the things on the list and...a turkey. He keeps emphasizing the money they will save since they can use it for their Christmas dinner. We laughed at the trouble this silly turkey caused and yet the family was so attached they could not use him for their dinner. Usually children's stories are fairly predictable, but I never would have guessed this ending! Very detailed illustrations allow you to look further at the mischief caused by the turkey.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    When Pa went to the market, no one expected him to come home with a turkey to fatten up for Christmas dinner. The chaos that ensues as this young family tries to raise a turkey in a small apartment is priceless. Many of the details come out through the illustrations instead of the actual words of the story. Will the family survive? Will they save money? Will they be able to butcher the turkey come Christmas? Great story that emphasizes family, love, and togetherness at Christmas time, instead of When Pa went to the market, no one expected him to come home with a turkey to fatten up for Christmas dinner. The chaos that ensues as this young family tries to raise a turkey in a small apartment is priceless. Many of the details come out through the illustrations instead of the actual words of the story. Will the family survive? Will they save money? Will they be able to butcher the turkey come Christmas? Great story that emphasizes family, love, and togetherness at Christmas time, instead of Santa and materialism.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rosa Cline

    This is kind of a quirky book; but it was fun. A family is having a difficult time making ends met and Christmas was coming. The mother sends the Dad to buy a couple of eggs and some flour to make dinner with. But he comes home with a baby turkey to raise for Christmas dinner. Thinking in the long run it will save them money. The kids feed him and take care of him. He gets into all sorts of trouble being a bird and living in an apartment building. The ending of the book isn't what you think it w This is kind of a quirky book; but it was fun. A family is having a difficult time making ends met and Christmas was coming. The mother sends the Dad to buy a couple of eggs and some flour to make dinner with. But he comes home with a baby turkey to raise for Christmas dinner. Thinking in the long run it will save them money. The kids feed him and take care of him. He gets into all sorts of trouble being a bird and living in an apartment building. The ending of the book isn't what you think it will be but all has a Happy Christmas in the end.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    Ma sends Pa out to the market to get just two things and comes home with a turkey to save some money for Christmas dinner. Pa says the turkey can live in a box next to the stove. Well, things don't seem to go as planned with the turkey living all over the small apartment and outside the apartment as well. The neighbors aren't happy about the turkey living in the apartment. I won't give away the ending but this is a silly book with several laugh out loud opportunities. Ma sends Pa out to the market to get just two things and comes home with a turkey to save some money for Christmas dinner. Pa says the turkey can live in a box next to the stove. Well, things don't seem to go as planned with the turkey living all over the small apartment and outside the apartment as well. The neighbors aren't happy about the turkey living in the apartment. I won't give away the ending but this is a silly book with several laugh out loud opportunities.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    My reading of this suffered from my own heightened expectations--I'd somehow convinced myself this was going to be a masterpiece (and hilarious), but it isn't. (Just funny, not hilarious.) When I stepped back, I recognized that I think it's way better than most of the longer-story picture books I've read of the last few years, so. I mean, there's nothing cheesy in it at all, so that alone bumps it up above the crowd. My reading of this suffered from my own heightened expectations--I'd somehow convinced myself this was going to be a masterpiece (and hilarious), but it isn't. (Just funny, not hilarious.) When I stepped back, I recognized that I think it's way better than most of the longer-story picture books I've read of the last few years, so. I mean, there's nothing cheesy in it at all, so that alone bumps it up above the crowd.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Garrett

    As usual when Pa is sent to the store for the ingredients for pancakes he picks up something extra a turkey poult. He explains they will save money raising the turkey to be Christmas dinner. He doesn't take into account the fact they are living in a small three room flat and have very little money to feed another mouth. The children in the story name the turkey Alfred and all kinds of turkey problems keep cropping up. As usual when Pa is sent to the store for the ingredients for pancakes he picks up something extra a turkey poult. He explains they will save money raising the turkey to be Christmas dinner. He doesn't take into account the fact they are living in a small three room flat and have very little money to feed another mouth. The children in the story name the turkey Alfred and all kinds of turkey problems keep cropping up.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Destinee Sutton

    I brought this out at Christmas for a reading. My four-year-old niece listened patiently, but was not into it. I could tell she was bored and not following the story. However, my seven-year-old niece liked it. She didn't laugh out loud or anything, but I think she was amused by it and picked up on the moral. This made the shortlist for SLJ's Mock Newbery blog, so I think my expectations were way too high going in. I brought this out at Christmas for a reading. My four-year-old niece listened patiently, but was not into it. I could tell she was bored and not following the story. However, my seven-year-old niece liked it. She didn't laugh out loud or anything, but I think she was amused by it and picked up on the moral. This made the shortlist for SLJ's Mock Newbery blog, so I think my expectations were way too high going in.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jo Oehrlein

    Historical fiction set approximately in 1900. Does present the father as less responsible when shopping than the children. Shows how a bargain isn't always a bargain. Quite predictable that (view spoiler)[ they would say they couldn't eat the turkey when it came time (hide spoiler)] . Set at Christmas and has a theme of being happy with what you have. Feels like Little Women, Mrs. Piggle Wiggle, Daddy's Girl, and other old-fashioned books. Historical fiction set approximately in 1900. Does present the father as less responsible when shopping than the children. Shows how a bargain isn't always a bargain. Quite predictable that (view spoiler)[ they would say they couldn't eat the turkey when it came time (hide spoiler)] . Set at Christmas and has a theme of being happy with what you have. Feels like Little Women, Mrs. Piggle Wiggle, Daddy's Girl, and other old-fashioned books.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    I enjoyed the illustrations more than I did the story. The story would be predictable and humorous to students of a certain age, however. It could be used as a Social Studies reference to demonstrate the crowded conditions of a tenement circa 1890 or so. It reminds me of a story my mother tells of raising a turkey in their home during the Great Depression, only to be shocked that they were going to have it for dinner.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Roberts

    New story with folk tale flair. Reminiscent of O'Henry, this quirky tale is set in the past. The humor and irony make this a book kids will enjoy. Clever not-exactly-as-expected ending. Amazing watercolor illustrations by a classic illustrator. New story with folk tale flair. Reminiscent of O'Henry, this quirky tale is set in the past. The humor and irony make this a book kids will enjoy. Clever not-exactly-as-expected ending. Amazing watercolor illustrations by a classic illustrator.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kacee Eddinger

    The Money We'll Save gets a little icky at points as they have to talk about turkey poop. But I think it makes a good point about how sometimes, when you think you're saving money, you are just going to end up giving a fully grown turkey to your neighbor as a Christmas gift. The Money We'll Save gets a little icky at points as they have to talk about turkey poop. But I think it makes a good point about how sometimes, when you think you're saving money, you are just going to end up giving a fully grown turkey to your neighbor as a Christmas gift.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Davidson

    It is soon to be Christmas, so to save money Pa buys a young turkey to raise for Christmas dinner. That turkey proves to be more stress and bother than anticipated. Enjoyable story with a funny ending. Wonderful illustrations.

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