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Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters

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Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus and sparked a boycott that changed America. Harriet Tubman helped more than three hundred slaves escape the South on the Underground Railroad. Shirley Chisholm became the first black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. The lives these women led are part of an incredible story about courage in the face of oppres Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus and sparked a boycott that changed America. Harriet Tubman helped more than three hundred slaves escape the South on the Underground Railroad. Shirley Chisholm became the first black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. The lives these women led are part of an incredible story about courage in the face of oppression; about the challenges and triumphs of the battle for civil rights; and about speaking out for what you believe in--even when it feels like no one is listening. Andrea Davis Pinkney's moving text and Stephen Alcorn's glorious portraits celebrate the lives of ten bold women who lit the path to freedom for generations. Includes biographies of Sojournor Truth, Biddy Mason, Harriet Tubman, Ida B.Wells-Barnett, Mary McLeod Bethune, Ella Josephine Baker, Dorothy Irene Height, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Shirley Chisholm.


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Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus and sparked a boycott that changed America. Harriet Tubman helped more than three hundred slaves escape the South on the Underground Railroad. Shirley Chisholm became the first black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. The lives these women led are part of an incredible story about courage in the face of oppres Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus and sparked a boycott that changed America. Harriet Tubman helped more than three hundred slaves escape the South on the Underground Railroad. Shirley Chisholm became the first black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. The lives these women led are part of an incredible story about courage in the face of oppression; about the challenges and triumphs of the battle for civil rights; and about speaking out for what you believe in--even when it feels like no one is listening. Andrea Davis Pinkney's moving text and Stephen Alcorn's glorious portraits celebrate the lives of ten bold women who lit the path to freedom for generations. Includes biographies of Sojournor Truth, Biddy Mason, Harriet Tubman, Ida B.Wells-Barnett, Mary McLeod Bethune, Ella Josephine Baker, Dorothy Irene Height, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Shirley Chisholm.

30 review for Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters

  1. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Patton

    Let It Shine is organized chronologically and covers the lives of ten women: Sojourner Truth, Biddy Mason, Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Mary McLeod Bethune, Ella Josephine Baker, Dorothy Irene Height, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Shirley Chisholm. The first page of each of the ten biographies are of paintings of each woman. The paintings reflect each freedom fighter's accomplishments. I do feel that there should have been more pictures to accompany each biography, but I do recognize Let It Shine is organized chronologically and covers the lives of ten women: Sojourner Truth, Biddy Mason, Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Mary McLeod Bethune, Ella Josephine Baker, Dorothy Irene Height, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Shirley Chisholm. The first page of each of the ten biographies are of paintings of each woman. The paintings reflect each freedom fighter's accomplishments. I do feel that there should have been more pictures to accompany each biography, but I do recognize that the book is for older children (in middle or high school). Overall, very informative!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ryne

    CATEGORY SATISFIED: Nonfiction/Informational Unless you're more than a casual connoisseur of American history—and I'm not—you probably don't know a lot about Sojourner Truth except for her famous phrase, "Ain't I a woman?" And unless you're an expert in the civil and women's rights movements—and I'm not—you probably don't know who Biddy Mason or Ida B. Wells-Barnett were. I didn't, and so reading Pinkney's brief biographies of black women freedom fighters (accompanied by colorful and inspiring il CATEGORY SATISFIED: Nonfiction/Informational Unless you're more than a casual connoisseur of American history—and I'm not—you probably don't know a lot about Sojourner Truth except for her famous phrase, "Ain't I a woman?" And unless you're an expert in the civil and women's rights movements—and I'm not—you probably don't know who Biddy Mason or Ida B. Wells-Barnett were. I didn't, and so reading Pinkney's brief biographies of black women freedom fighters (accompanied by colorful and inspiring illustrations by Stephen Alcorn) was both an informative and enjoyable experience for me. Pinkney's goal was to put a new spin on some women (such as Harriet Tubman) that we "already know," but also for us to meet others "for the very first time," and she has succeeded admirably at this. Biographies range from the quintessential (i.e. Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, etc.) to some women whose contributions were significant but who, at least for me, were little-known figures. (I knew nothing about Shirley Chisholm, for example, which might be surprising to some people. I was very interested by her rise from a child born in relative poverty to being the first black woman to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives.) The text of the book is pretty straightforward, but there are some aspects that remind me of storytelling and that use more descriptive, poetic language. For example: "When the good Lord was handing out the gift of conviction, he gave a hefty dose to Sojourner Truth. . . [she] was as black as the blackest ebony wood, rich and dark and beautiful." It might have been my imagination, but I think Pinkney's language became less poetic as she discussed people who lived closer to our own day (like Chisholm), probably because more information is known about these latter figures and there's less room for interpretation. The stories were engaging, and even though this is a piece of nonfiction about events that have already happened, I was still interested enough to wonder what would happen next to these women, and I kept on reading. (It was good of Pinkney to not tell us from the get-go what these women would accomplish—it made the stories more of, well, stories, and I appreciated that.) The book describes itself as being for all ages, and I'd agree with that, though I think it would be more appreciated by junior high and high schoolers. The stories are told fairly simply, but they aren't dumbed-down, which I appreciated. If you're looking for a fairly straightforward and easy-to-read account of influential African American women, look no further than Let it Shine.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Julieann Wielga

    I have been thinking a lot about what it means to be black and what it means to be white. Chimimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Nigerian author of Americanah, says in her pod cast, that there is not just one story. I think my path, in the last couple of years, has been to be able to find some of those other stories, so that when I see them I know them. Let it Shine, Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters, written by Andrea Davis Pinkney and beautifully illustrated by Stephen Alcorn and only distributed th I have been thinking a lot about what it means to be black and what it means to be white. Chimimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Nigerian author of Americanah, says in her pod cast, that there is not just one story. I think my path, in the last couple of years, has been to be able to find some of those other stories, so that when I see them I know them. Let it Shine, Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters, written by Andrea Davis Pinkney and beautifully illustrated by Stephen Alcorn and only distributed through the school market, is 10 stories of 10 brave black women, 6 of whom, I had never heard of before. Each sentence in this book, is a storyteller's sentence. I can just hear some deep, powerful, confident, woman telling these stories.It might have been Sojourner Truth herself writing down these words to give hope like she did in her "Aint I a woman?" speech. Biddy Mason became free when her owner moved to California (1855). There she midwifed and healed. She saved enough money to buy a house, and then to buy more lots of land for the blacks of Los Angelos. Ida Be Wells-Barnett in 1982 wrote an article that described and enumerated the lynchings in Tennessee. Mary McLeod Bethune formed the National Council of Negro Woman in 1935 and became a good friend of Eleanor Roosevelt. Ella Joshephine Baker became (1942) the national director of branches of the Naacp. Dorothy Irene Height said "black woman are the blackbone of every institution."She became president of the NCNW. Fanny Lou Hamer fought for black voting right in the South. Andrea and her husband, Davis Pinkney have a similar volume of ten African American men who made history called Hand in Hand. These are not the books that kids might pick up on their own. But they are the kind of books, that their teachers need to read and hear as well as the students.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Mason

    1.Biography 2.Let It Shine is a lovely collection of ten biographies of black women involved in the fight for racial, political, and economic freedoms. Biographies date from the life of Sojourner Truth in the early 1800’s to that of Shirley Chisholm‘s bid for the presidency in the 1970’s. 3.A. Illustrations B. Stephen Alcorn has created rich and colorful oil based portraits of each woman featured in this biographical collection. The paintings are full of symbolic references of each woman’s accompl 1.Biography 2.Let It Shine is a lovely collection of ten biographies of black women involved in the fight for racial, political, and economic freedoms. Biographies date from the life of Sojourner Truth in the early 1800’s to that of Shirley Chisholm‘s bid for the presidency in the 1970’s. 3.A. Illustrations B. Stephen Alcorn has created rich and colorful oil based portraits of each woman featured in this biographical collection. The paintings are full of symbolic references of each woman’s accomplishments and her impact on the freedom movement. C. Harriet Tubman’s portrait is of a black women kneeling on railroad tracks pointing up to the North Star. Other black figures are climbing on her outstretched arms walking across her shoulders toward the star and of course freedom. Mary McLeod Bethune is drawn as the face of a sunflower holding books and a pencil above the school she founded. As a teacher, she shined the gift of knowledge to countless young black girls and helped the country grow in their understanding of this need. And in the last chapter, Shirley Chisholm is seen in a brightly colored dress climbing a ladder to the White House. She is reaching for the ‘American’ dream. The portraits are all beautifully bold representations of the women who were equally beautiful and bold with the work that they did to advance the causes of civil rights. 4.The biographies lend themselves to excellent read alouds. The stories of hardship that many of these women experienced at such an early age are important for students to understand. The individual portraits by Alcorn can also be used in a study of symbolism and as introduction to the study of historical figures like Tubman that are often part of U. S. history curriculum.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Upchurch

    Andrea Pinkney’s inspirational text describes the lives of ten courageous and bold women who ignited a fire of freedom for later generations to experience. Some of the biographies include Harriet Tubman, Ella Josephine Baker, Sojourner Truth, Rosa parks and many more. This informative and educational book highlights the decisions made by ten brave women throughout the course of history. Their actions and choices are displayed in detail throughout the book. The first page of each biography has a Andrea Pinkney’s inspirational text describes the lives of ten courageous and bold women who ignited a fire of freedom for later generations to experience. Some of the biographies include Harriet Tubman, Ella Josephine Baker, Sojourner Truth, Rosa parks and many more. This informative and educational book highlights the decisions made by ten brave women throughout the course of history. Their actions and choices are displayed in detail throughout the book. The first page of each biography has a painting of each woman symbolizing the freedom fighters accomplishment. This book is very moving as it highlights the exploration of their individual childhoods, while at the same time giving respect to their accomplishments as adults. These women stood for the causes of abolition, civil rights and women’s rights and Andrea Pinkney did them justice as she accounts for their biographical attributes while still managing to maintain a young readers attention. My only comment about the book would have been a desire for more illustrations. But I can in fact see myself as a future teacher using this book to bring about awareness for African American history along with the importance of women history. For example, students could get in groups and focus on one freedom fighter. Groups could create a timeline and plot important dates that correlate to their lives. Students could also choose two freedom fighters and compare and contrast them both together. This would be a great way to get the whole class working in small groups to achieve a common goal, yet still would allow for the exploration and learning of ten very influential women.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jami Good

    I used this book as a starting point to then look up more in-depth histories of the women I didn't know very well. Which was most of them. I learned so much about not just each individual freedom fighter, but how they were all influenced by the women who came before them, or were on the same team/organization in later years. It really felt like a story about one person at a time who was able to affect change by making one seemingly simple or small choice at the right moment, and then joining wit I used this book as a starting point to then look up more in-depth histories of the women I didn't know very well. Which was most of them. I learned so much about not just each individual freedom fighter, but how they were all influenced by the women who came before them, or were on the same team/organization in later years. It really felt like a story about one person at a time who was able to affect change by making one seemingly simple or small choice at the right moment, and then joining with others to build upon those actions. Personal responsibility and community and inter-connectedness. Small biographies beautifully written and illustrated for the following women: Sojourner Truth Biddy Mason Harriet Tubman Ida B.Wells-Barnett Mary McLeod Bethune Ella Josephine Baker Dorothy Irene Height Rosa Parks Fannie Lou Hamer Shirley Chisholm I worried that using "Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters" to kickstart reasearch would lessen the poetry aspect of the writing, and that happened a little bit. When I went back to reread all the essays, the poetry returned, but with greater depth behind the words. It was cool to read about Andrea Davis Pinkney, who is an influential Black Woman author in her own right. And the illustrations by Stephen Alcorn were lovely companions to Pinkney's words. This is a solid starting point for learning about women you may or may not already know about, but need to know.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sasha Boersma

    Lovely collection of stories of African American women who fought for equal rights and the abolition of slavery in the United States. I especially enjoyed the stories of the lesser known activists focused on access to education and their achievements. Each historical figure is portrayed with a gorgeous illustration, and a couple of pages of biography. Ideal for grades 3/4/5.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Such powerful women. Students need to hear these stories. This is a book teachers will need to share because, at least my students, would not pick this up on their own. It would be nice if it were updated, and I wish it had more illustrations. Great first background information for students doing reports. We all need to remember and learn from these women because if we do not learn from history we are destined to repeat it. Love Chisholm’s quote. “...someday, somehow, someone other than a white Such powerful women. Students need to hear these stories. This is a book teachers will need to share because, at least my students, would not pick this up on their own. It would be nice if it were updated, and I wish it had more illustrations. Great first background information for students doing reports. We all need to remember and learn from these women because if we do not learn from history we are destined to repeat it. Love Chisholm’s quote. “...someday, somehow, someone other than a white male could be president.“

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jo Oehrlein

    Loved this story of 10 black women freedom fighters who fought slavery, Jim Crow, and lynchings and who worked for civil rights and equality. Some I knew like Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, and Ida B Wells. Others, like Biddy Mason, were new to me. I liked the color given to the story by the words the author chose. The book begins "When the Good Lord was handing out the gift of conviction, he gave a hefty dose to Sojourner Truth." That's a sample of the writing style that continues through the b Loved this story of 10 black women freedom fighters who fought slavery, Jim Crow, and lynchings and who worked for civil rights and equality. Some I knew like Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, and Ida B Wells. Others, like Biddy Mason, were new to me. I liked the color given to the story by the words the author chose. The book begins "When the Good Lord was handing out the gift of conviction, he gave a hefty dose to Sojourner Truth." That's a sample of the writing style that continues through the book. It feels like a story teller speaking to a group of eager listeners.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This book features so many phenomenal women. I can't recommend it enough. Some names were familiar, others were new to me. These are the sort of women we should emulate and look up to, brilliant, brave and determined. I was going to write that we don't have female role models like that anymore, but I think the truth is that there are a lot of remarkable women doing remarkable things these days. We just need to shift the spotlight in their direction. This book features so many phenomenal women. I can't recommend it enough. Some names were familiar, others were new to me. These are the sort of women we should emulate and look up to, brilliant, brave and determined. I was going to write that we don't have female role models like that anymore, but I think the truth is that there are a lot of remarkable women doing remarkable things these days. We just need to shift the spotlight in their direction.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is a solid introductory collection of Black women freedom fighters that is well worth the read for all ages. The casual storyteller tone of it makes for easy and enjoyable reading. The author manages to include a broad variety of women, ranging from the expected to the little known. Definitely recommended.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lara Lleverino

    I’m going to have a hard time putting into words how great this book is! I learned so much from reading it. It challenged my thinking on so many issues in good ways! The writing is superb! I will be reading more Andrea Davis Pinkney for sure!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    Accessible stories of 10 Black Women Freedom Fighters, som you know and some you may not. I was most interested in learning about Fannie Lou Hamer and Shirley Chisholm. Great resource. Beautiful art. Inspiring.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Skyler McKenzie

    Very uplifting story of the women who fought for civil rights.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Book Buying With Katie

    Solid collection. I wish it had forgone some of the super well-known names in favor of lesson known women or a queer woman.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shel

    Pinkney, A.D. (2000). Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters. New York: Harcourt, Inc. 015201005x Oh, that Pinkney family. One after another, successful children’s authors and illustrators. A Coretta Scott King Honor book, Let It Shine chronologically shares the stories of ten black woman who have fought for freedom and civil rights throughout American history. The stories are not so much complete biographical accounts of the women, but rather use child-friendly language to share rel Pinkney, A.D. (2000). Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters. New York: Harcourt, Inc. 015201005x Oh, that Pinkney family. One after another, successful children’s authors and illustrators. A Coretta Scott King Honor book, Let It Shine chronologically shares the stories of ten black woman who have fought for freedom and civil rights throughout American history. The stories are not so much complete biographical accounts of the women, but rather use child-friendly language to share relevant aspects of their lives. While the accounts are organized chronologically, but do incorporate some overlap in time and even interaction. Let It Shine does include some well-known freedom fighters, but it also incorporates many lesser-known women whose stories are important to know. One of the ways to make this book particularly relevant to current events, is through the account of Shirley Chisholm’s political experiences and run for the Presidency. Pinkney was wise (lucky?) enough to feature Chisholm’s quote “Someday, somewhere, somehow, someone other than a white male could be President” (p. 95). Pinkney goes on to include in her conclusion to Chisholm “It proved to everyone else that a little girl from Brooklyn , whose parents could not afford to buy a home, could dare to dream of becoming the number-one tenant of the White House. Shirley had been right: America was changing” (p. 104). Hahaha. And America kept on changing…preparing for Obama to step into that White House. Wonderful conversation starter. Each account shares only a few if any historical dates or events beyond the dates of birth and death, so a teacher would have to provide support over the setting and significant influences of the time (or have students research them in groups). The illustrations are bright, colorful and often metaphorical. And while there are not pictures present on every page, enough are distributed throughout the chapters to provide students with breaks and keep them motivated. Activities to do with the book: If students were assigned to do reports or presentations on these women, the relevant chapter for that student could be invaluable. A teacher could also incorporate facts from this book into their history lessons. A teacher could draw out the fact that several of these women had to drop out of school as young children and work to help keep their families together (Fannie Lou Hamer is one example). This fact could help get students to contemplate the evolving expectations and treatments of children throughout history. Students could examine this book (or Nelson’s We Are the Ship, reviewed previously) for personalized language that helps make information books like these ones seem more engaging and familiar. This is a great resource to keep on the shelf as a reference book or to assign to students on a chapter-by-chapter basis or as recommended reading. Favorite Quotes: “On August 28, 1963, one month before I was born, my father stood on Washington D.C.’s great lawn and listened with rapt attention to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivering his unforgettable “I Have a Dream” speech. Just blocks away, in my parents’ tiny apartment in southeast Washington, my pregnant mother watched the history-making even on television. Mom says I kicked and squirmed inside her belly throughout Dr. King’s powerful speech. And though I was yet to be born, the March on Washington became my earliest experience with the civil rights movement. But there would be countless others” (p. ix). “[Soujourner Truth:]’s voice to a fiery boom of truth—her truth…”You say Jesus was a man, so that means God favors men over women. Where did your Christ come from?” she asked. Then she summoned her father’s backbone strength and stood tall to answer her own question. “Jesus came from God and a woman. Man had nothing to do with him” (pp. 6-7). “By this time America had slipped into what was called the Great Depression. Times were hard; there weren’t many jobs. Formerly rich folks and poor folks, black folks and white folks, stood together in the same unemployment lines” (p. 49). For more of my reviews, visit sjkessel.blogspot.com.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Ages 6 and up. Biographies of African-American women who became icons of U.S. Civil Rights history, beautifully rendered by my friend Stephen Alcorn. This book won the Coretta Scott King Award.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jacinda Castro

    This book tells the stories of ten black women living in times of slavery, discrimination, and oppression, and how they cam to fight for their freedom and push the act civil rights forward. We see the stories of Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, and other significant black women, some we may have known about and some that we don't recognize. The author gives a personal touch to each story, such as sometimes adding in what the thoughts each woman was having at the moment, even though t This book tells the stories of ten black women living in times of slavery, discrimination, and oppression, and how they cam to fight for their freedom and push the act civil rights forward. We see the stories of Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, and other significant black women, some we may have known about and some that we don't recognize. The author gives a personal touch to each story, such as sometimes adding in what the thoughts each woman was having at the moment, even though the author couldn't have known exactly what they were thinking at the time. By doing so the reader can have more of an idea of what each woman must have been thinking or feeling at the time, and has them connect with them. The illustrations were also amazing. Each picture corresponded to the accomplishment of each woman, and next these illustrations were the beginning of the story they went with, which also included a quote form each woman. This helps readers actually picture what these woman were like, and understand their accomplishments.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Summary (CIP): The stories of ten African American women who challenged authority in the freedom issues of their times, arranged chronologically from mid 1800's to modern times. REVIEW: Pinkney includes a personal preface that traces her family background growing up in the civil rights movement and its effects on her. The selection of familiar and not so well known women lets the women speak in their own words with many quotes and includes personal details. Blending bibliographic information with Summary (CIP): The stories of ten African American women who challenged authority in the freedom issues of their times, arranged chronologically from mid 1800's to modern times. REVIEW: Pinkney includes a personal preface that traces her family background growing up in the civil rights movement and its effects on her. The selection of familiar and not so well known women lets the women speak in their own words with many quotes and includes personal details. Blending bibliographic information with colloquial and storytelling language makes for an intimate and engaging writing style that will hold readers’ attention. The artwork contributes very strongly to the strength of the image of each woman, being somewhat allegorical. SLJ: Positive. "This excellent collection is a must for every library." Booklist: Positive. "The immediacy of the text and the spacious design of the large volume make this a natural for reading aloud."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kaelyn O'Brien

    The book describes the lives of ten courageous and bold women who ignited a fire of freedom for later generations to experience. Some of the biographies include Harriet Tubman, Ella Josephine Baker, Sojourner Truth, Rosa parks and many more. This informative and educational book highlights the decisions made by ten brave women throughout the course of history. This is another great book to use to show the achievements of African-American people in our nation's history. I would definitely use thi The book describes the lives of ten courageous and bold women who ignited a fire of freedom for later generations to experience. Some of the biographies include Harriet Tubman, Ella Josephine Baker, Sojourner Truth, Rosa parks and many more. This informative and educational book highlights the decisions made by ten brave women throughout the course of history. This is another great book to use to show the achievements of African-American people in our nation's history. I would definitely use this book in a unit of the civil rights era and maybe even have students study each woman and their contribution to society. As I was reading this I felt as if I got to know the women better and I gained an appreciation for everything that they did to fight for the rights of African-Americans and women's rights as well. I think this would be a great book to have in any classroom as it teaches real-life events and people, and very important social issues in general.

  21. 4 out of 5

    sweet pea

    don't know how i missed this one. it has several of my favorite people in it, notably Ida B. Wells, Ella Baker, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Shirley Chisholm. the author chose a good mix of well-known and moderately-well-known womyn. the biographies give a good overview of the womyn's lives. but the prose is sometimes flowery. i'm always perplexed by what details young adult biographies leave out. she does mention Rosa Park's previous NAACP activism. but she don't mention the predecessors that were thr don't know how i missed this one. it has several of my favorite people in it, notably Ida B. Wells, Ella Baker, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Shirley Chisholm. the author chose a good mix of well-known and moderately-well-known womyn. the biographies give a good overview of the womyn's lives. but the prose is sometimes flowery. i'm always perplexed by what details young adult biographies leave out. she does mention Rosa Park's previous NAACP activism. but she don't mention the predecessors that were thrown off the Montgomery buses, such as Claudette Colvin. the illustrations are beautiful. but some are more poignant (and relevant) to the person profiled than others. a slightly-flawed but still informative book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I feel like I learned a lot more from this book than from 28 Days: Moments in Black History that Changed the World . Partly, this is only about 10 people (instead of 28+) and each person gets a significantly longer story. Also, while I had heard of Mary McLeod Bethune and Fannie Lou Hamer before, I couldn't have told you anything about them; and totally new to me were Biddy Mason, Ella Josephine Baker, and Dorothy Irene Height. My biggest complaint is that the chapters were inconsistent as to I feel like I learned a lot more from this book than from 28 Days: Moments in Black History that Changed the World . Partly, this is only about 10 people (instead of 28+) and each person gets a significantly longer story. Also, while I had heard of Mary McLeod Bethune and Fannie Lou Hamer before, I couldn't have told you anything about them; and totally new to me were Biddy Mason, Ella Josephine Baker, and Dorothy Irene Height. My biggest complaint is that the chapters were inconsistent as to whether it introduces a woman by her birth name or her adult name.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    Informative and educational! Every day that we live, there's an opportunity or chance to learn something new no matter how intelligent or illiterate we believe ourselves to be. While reading this book, I discovered four black women civil right activists I'd never heard of (imagine being 53 years old and the first time that you read of someone is in a children's book): Biddy Mason; Ella Josephine Baker (whom I'd mistakenly believed was the famous Black Parisian singer); Fannie Lou Hamer, and Doro Informative and educational! Every day that we live, there's an opportunity or chance to learn something new no matter how intelligent or illiterate we believe ourselves to be. While reading this book, I discovered four black women civil right activists I'd never heard of (imagine being 53 years old and the first time that you read of someone is in a children's book): Biddy Mason; Ella Josephine Baker (whom I'd mistakenly believed was the famous Black Parisian singer); Fannie Lou Hamer, and Dorothy Height. Here is a book that I will definitely pass along to my 10 year old great niece so that she can discover these powerful, and intelligent black women (if she hasn't already).

  24. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    A series of brief bios about African American women who worked to challenge inequality, oppression, and prejudice. The ten entries include some well known names in history such as Rosa Parks and Harriet Tubman while some women readers may only recognize by name such as Fanny Lou Hamer and Mary McLeod Bethune. The writing is excellent! The tone is that of a storyteller. These short entries contain enough information for bio projects and great read alouds, especially during Black History Month or A series of brief bios about African American women who worked to challenge inequality, oppression, and prejudice. The ten entries include some well known names in history such as Rosa Parks and Harriet Tubman while some women readers may only recognize by name such as Fanny Lou Hamer and Mary McLeod Bethune. The writing is excellent! The tone is that of a storyteller. These short entries contain enough information for bio projects and great read alouds, especially during Black History Month or an American History unit. Grades 4-6.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jozef Syndicate

    A challenging collection of biographies masterfully illustrated for middle grade or advanced lower grade readers. Each story tells about a dynamic woman who was instrumental in gaining freedom from slavery, Jim Crow, segregation, or sexism. From the most recognizable women like Sojourner Truth to the more obscure Freedom Fighters like Biddy Mason, "Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women" presents in detail the challenges and successes of ten women. Andrea Davis Pickney again delivers a great read A challenging collection of biographies masterfully illustrated for middle grade or advanced lower grade readers. Each story tells about a dynamic woman who was instrumental in gaining freedom from slavery, Jim Crow, segregation, or sexism. From the most recognizable women like Sojourner Truth to the more obscure Freedom Fighters like Biddy Mason, "Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women" presents in detail the challenges and successes of ten women. Andrea Davis Pickney again delivers a great read with clarity and a hefty dose of pride. BuytheBook.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lana Hoffman

    The stories in this book were incredibly inspiring. These women are wonderful role models. Their strength and determination in the face of real evil and terror is moving. Pinkney was able to take a heartbreaking piece of history and bring it to life with her descriptive stories. The language she uses is powerful. As a reader you can't help but react to these stories. This is quality literature, because it is original and provides awareness to an important time in our history. The stories in this book were incredibly inspiring. These women are wonderful role models. Their strength and determination in the face of real evil and terror is moving. Pinkney was able to take a heartbreaking piece of history and bring it to life with her descriptive stories. The language she uses is powerful. As a reader you can't help but react to these stories. This is quality literature, because it is original and provides awareness to an important time in our history.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julie Suzanne

    Absolutely perfect in length and reading level for a very short, in-class biography unit at the middle school level. Perfect for Black History Month. If you have one copy, it'd be fun to pass around, each student choosing a different woman on which to focus, get a class set, or even better, a few copies for small reading groups to pass around, each student focusing on a different woman and sharing with the group. Absolutely perfect in length and reading level for a very short, in-class biography unit at the middle school level. Perfect for Black History Month. If you have one copy, it'd be fun to pass around, each student choosing a different woman on which to focus, get a class set, or even better, a few copies for small reading groups to pass around, each student focusing on a different woman and sharing with the group.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Glenna

    This is an excellent historical fiction book that won the 2001 Coretta Scott King Honor Book. It describes the lives of ten outstanding African American women. This book is geared for 5-8th graders due to it's content and wording. The appeal of this book is created through its vivid imagery and strong sense of voice in each brief biography. For example, each biography is introduced with an oil portrait of the featured women with her accomplishments reflected through additional imagery. This is an excellent historical fiction book that won the 2001 Coretta Scott King Honor Book. It describes the lives of ten outstanding African American women. This book is geared for 5-8th graders due to it's content and wording. The appeal of this book is created through its vivid imagery and strong sense of voice in each brief biography. For example, each biography is introduced with an oil portrait of the featured women with her accomplishments reflected through additional imagery.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hallema Mitchell

    This is a great book that helps kids learn about great African American Women. It featured ten strong, African American leaders and give us background about their lives. Its in chronological order which is great because it shows the progress Black women made. Even with the some sensitive nature, it was very appropriate and tastefully put together. The pictures are very beautiful and are direct representations of the story. The author did an amazing job with this book!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chenice

    I absolutely adore this book. It's so easy to read and has some excellent information featured in it. As it is men apart from Rosa Parks who are taught in History classes across the nation regarding Civil Rights; this book gives an interesting insight to the black women who impacted Civil Rights in unforgettable ways. I absolutely adore this book. It's so easy to read and has some excellent information featured in it. As it is men apart from Rosa Parks who are taught in History classes across the nation regarding Civil Rights; this book gives an interesting insight to the black women who impacted Civil Rights in unforgettable ways.

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