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Hoopskirts, Union Blues, and Confederate Grays: Civil War Fashions from 1861 to 1865

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What would you have worn if you lived during the Civil War era? It depends on who you were: -Upper-class women wore tight corsets, bustles, and wide hoop skirts to fancy balls. The layers weighed almost 30 pounds (14 kilograms)! -For everyday, whether at home or nursing soldiers, women put on multiple layers of simple fabrics. Some daredevils sported women's trousers--called What would you have worn if you lived during the Civil War era? It depends on who you were: -Upper-class women wore tight corsets, bustles, and wide hoop skirts to fancy balls. The layers weighed almost 30 pounds (14 kilograms)! -For everyday, whether at home or nursing soldiers, women put on multiple layers of simple fabrics. Some daredevils sported women's trousers--called Bloomers--to make a statement on women's rights. -Civil War soldiers wore flannel and wool uniforms--blue in the North and gray in the South. -Men of fashion donned suits with velvet collar and silk lapels during the day and coats with fancy tails for parties. -Underneath their everyday clothing--a shirt, tie, vest, coat and trousers--men wore "drawers," baggy long undergarments that buttoned in front and tied in back. -Slaves wore whatever their owners gave them--usually only two sets of rough linen clothing, one for winter and one for summer. -Girls had loose garments called pantalets and pinafores, while sailor suits were popular for boys. Read more about wartime fashions of the 1860s--from ankle boots to parasols and tiaras--in this fascinating book!


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What would you have worn if you lived during the Civil War era? It depends on who you were: -Upper-class women wore tight corsets, bustles, and wide hoop skirts to fancy balls. The layers weighed almost 30 pounds (14 kilograms)! -For everyday, whether at home or nursing soldiers, women put on multiple layers of simple fabrics. Some daredevils sported women's trousers--called What would you have worn if you lived during the Civil War era? It depends on who you were: -Upper-class women wore tight corsets, bustles, and wide hoop skirts to fancy balls. The layers weighed almost 30 pounds (14 kilograms)! -For everyday, whether at home or nursing soldiers, women put on multiple layers of simple fabrics. Some daredevils sported women's trousers--called Bloomers--to make a statement on women's rights. -Civil War soldiers wore flannel and wool uniforms--blue in the North and gray in the South. -Men of fashion donned suits with velvet collar and silk lapels during the day and coats with fancy tails for parties. -Underneath their everyday clothing--a shirt, tie, vest, coat and trousers--men wore "drawers," baggy long undergarments that buttoned in front and tied in back. -Slaves wore whatever their owners gave them--usually only two sets of rough linen clothing, one for winter and one for summer. -Girls had loose garments called pantalets and pinafores, while sailor suits were popular for boys. Read more about wartime fashions of the 1860s--from ankle boots to parasols and tiaras--in this fascinating book!

34 review for Hoopskirts, Union Blues, and Confederate Grays: Civil War Fashions from 1861 to 1865

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    This book is about Civil War era clothing in the U.S.A. It has wonderful pictures. Civilian, slave, and military dress are all covered. Wealthy omen were wearing 8 layers of clothing. Clothing that weighed 30 pounds. A crinoline skirt could be 18 feet around. Only 3 women wearing crinoline skirts could fit in an average-sized room. Women were pale. To have a tan meant you had to work - therefore tans were low-class. Women and men wore the hair of the people that they loved. A woman might carry a l This book is about Civil War era clothing in the U.S.A. It has wonderful pictures. Civilian, slave, and military dress are all covered. Wealthy omen were wearing 8 layers of clothing. Clothing that weighed 30 pounds. A crinoline skirt could be 18 feet around. Only 3 women wearing crinoline skirts could fit in an average-sized room. Women were pale. To have a tan meant you had to work - therefore tans were low-class. Women and men wore the hair of the people that they loved. A woman might carry a loved one's hair in a locket or wear a hair bracelet. A man might weave the hair of his wife or loved one into his watch chain or make a key chain out of it. Wearing your hair long was the only acceptable style for women. Waist-length or longer. Blue jeans are invented in 1853. The sewing machine is invented in 1850. In the 1850s, beards came back into fashion. Why? Because Indians equated facial hair with masculinity. In order to seem manly in the eyes of the Indians they were governing, British soldiers began to grow mustaches. Eventually it was an order - if you are stationed in India you must grow facial hair. This brought beards and mustaches back into fashion. Abraham Lincoln went from being a clean shaven man to a man with a beard. Why? Because an 11-year-old girl wrote to him in 1860, saying: All the ladies like whiskers and they would tease their husbands to vote for you, and then you would be president. Slaves were bought for $300 and clothed for $7. Slaves under the age of 15 were often only given one piece of clothing - a long shirt made of coarse linen - to wear. Frederick Douglass says: I suffered much from hunger, but much more from cold. In hottest summer and coldest winter, I was kept almost naked - no shoes, no stockings, no jacket, no trousers, nothing on but a coarse linen shirt, reaching only to my knees. Booker T. Washington writes: I can scarcely imagine any torture except, perhaps, the pulling of a tooth, that is equal to that caused by putting on a new flax shirt for the first time. In his autobiography he recounts how his loving older brother John would offer break in Booker's new flax shirt - wear it until it was less prickly. I learned a lot! And I loved the photographs. The dresses are beautiful and I wish I got to wear some. :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    I love history, especially American history and I love fashion! I am obsessed with fashions from The Civil War, so when I saw Hoopskirts, Union Blues, and Confederate Grays: Civil War Fashions from 1861 to 1865, I knew I had to read it! I really enjoyed reading about specific types of fashions from this time period. The book had everything from the types of dresses women wore, to what different classes of soldiers wore. It even incorporated the different clothes that slaves had. I also loved that I love history, especially American history and I love fashion! I am obsessed with fashions from The Civil War, so when I saw Hoopskirts, Union Blues, and Confederate Grays: Civil War Fashions from 1861 to 1865, I knew I had to read it! I really enjoyed reading about specific types of fashions from this time period. The book had everything from the types of dresses women wore, to what different classes of soldiers wore. It even incorporated the different clothes that slaves had. I also loved that mostly everything mentioned came with a picture. I even learned some interesting things about Abe Lincoln! As a social studies teacher, I would highly recommend this for any classroom or school library. Hoopskirts, Union Blues, and Confederate Grays is perfect the pre-teen obsessed with fashion, or the pre-teen who just wants to learn more about life during this time!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    This book was both fascinating and informative. It tells all about clothing worn in the U.S. during the Civil War, by men and women, in the North and South, and of all classes--in some cases, a little too much information for comfort! (The layers women wore were just amazing--in quantity and potential for discomfort.) If you want to feel very grateful that you live now instead of then, definitely pick up this book. It is a beautifully laid out volume, and really gives a feel for what it would ha This book was both fascinating and informative. It tells all about clothing worn in the U.S. during the Civil War, by men and women, in the North and South, and of all classes--in some cases, a little too much information for comfort! (The layers women wore were just amazing--in quantity and potential for discomfort.) If you want to feel very grateful that you live now instead of then, definitely pick up this book. It is a beautifully laid out volume, and really gives a feel for what it would have been like to dress--and live--in that time period. Highly recommended for anyone doing a study of the period or who just has an interest in fashion. I will definitely be looking into more of the books in this series, Dressing a Nation.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Angela Stockton

    Great reference for anyone interested in fashions from the civil war period. I am especially intrigued by the fashion women had, I find it beautiful, but I am also happy that we don't have to go through all that trouble today. I can't imagine wearing 30 pounds of clothing, and then changing my clothes a few hours later! I can't imagine how long it took to get dressed and have hair done each day. Amazing. Great reference for anyone interested in fashions from the civil war period. I am especially intrigued by the fashion women had, I find it beautiful, but I am also happy that we don't have to go through all that trouble today. I can't imagine wearing 30 pounds of clothing, and then changing my clothes a few hours later! I can't imagine how long it took to get dressed and have hair done each day. Amazing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I've always kind of been a geek about history. This book fed right into my geek-dom (not a word...I know) by exploring fashion and how it affected history and vice-verse. There are a lot of great pictures and some very good descriptions. A good, fun, educational, and fast read. I've always kind of been a geek about history. This book fed right into my geek-dom (not a word...I know) by exploring fashion and how it affected history and vice-verse. There are a lot of great pictures and some very good descriptions. A good, fun, educational, and fast read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Athena

    Great for kids and adults with any interest in the Civil War or fashion in general. Full review located on my blog: http://notmytypee.blogspot.com/2011/0... Great for kids and adults with any interest in the Civil War or fashion in general. Full review located on my blog: http://notmytypee.blogspot.com/2011/0...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    Excellent series about historical dress. I liked that it showed what the dress was for all classes of life. I would recommend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bunny

    I really enjoy these little books.

  9. 5 out of 5

    The Reading Countess

    http://www.recycleyourreads.com/?p=2648 http://www.recycleyourreads.com/?p=2648

  10. 5 out of 5

    April Spaugh

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maria Byler

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karen Ball

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maria Rodriguez

    I finished, I loved! Full review will go live closer to release time.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bronwyn

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alkalina

  16. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  19. 4 out of 5

    Briony

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Hopper

  21. 5 out of 5

    Donalyn

  22. 5 out of 5

    Holly Jorgenson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elise

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Bashore

  26. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  28. 4 out of 5

    Leandra

  29. 5 out of 5

    Teen & Young Adult Zone

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  31. 5 out of 5

    Robin Phares

  32. 5 out of 5

    Joelle

  33. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Ell

  34. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Liskey

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