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A Letter from a Distinguished English Commoner to a Peer of Ireland, on the Penal Laws Against Irish Catholics; Previous to the Late Repeal of a Part Thereof, in the Session of the Irish Parliament, Held AD 1782

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The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now for the first time these high-quality digital copies of original 18th century manuscripts are available in print, making them highly accessible to libraries, undergraduate students, and independent scholars.Delve into what it was like to live during the eighteenth century by reading the first-hand accounts of everyday people, including city dwellers and farmers, businessmen and bankers, artisans and merchants, artists and their patrons, politicians and their constituents. Original texts make the American, French, and Industrial revolutions vividly contemporary.++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: ++++British LibraryT037788Rt. Hon. Ed-d B-ke = Edmund Burke.Dublin: printed by Thomas M'Donnell, 1791. 24p.; 8


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The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now for the first time these high-quality digital copies of original 18th century manuscripts are available in print, making them highly accessible to libraries, undergraduate students, and independent scholars.Delve into what it was like to live during the eighteenth century by reading the first-hand accounts of everyday people, including city dwellers and farmers, businessmen and bankers, artisans and merchants, artists and their patrons, politicians and their constituents. Original texts make the American, French, and Industrial revolutions vividly contemporary.++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: ++++British LibraryT037788Rt. Hon. Ed-d B-ke = Edmund Burke.Dublin: printed by Thomas M'Donnell, 1791. 24p.; 8

10 review for A Letter from a Distinguished English Commoner to a Peer of Ireland, on the Penal Laws Against Irish Catholics; Previous to the Late Repeal of a Part Thereof, in the Session of the Irish Parliament, Held AD 1782

  1. 4 out of 5

    A

    Anglo-Irish statesmen, member of the English Parliament Edmund Burke presents an appeal to Penal Reform on the disability and degradation of Roman Catholics; and the discord of the Irish populace at large, under the British Penal System in late 18th century Ireland. The actual Penal Laws and Reforms to which Burke is commenting on are not specified beyond a general account of grievances over criticism of disenfranchisement. A footnote however claims it is (at least partially it is) in regards to Anglo-Irish statesmen, member of the English Parliament Edmund Burke presents an appeal to Penal Reform on the disability and degradation of Roman Catholics; and the discord of the Irish populace at large, under the British Penal System in late 18th century Ireland. The actual Penal Laws and Reforms to which Burke is commenting on are not specified beyond a general account of grievances over criticism of disenfranchisement. A footnote however claims it is (at least partially it is) in regards to education relief. Catholic education was prohibited, and those clergy who were capable of seeking it abroad also came under prohibition. There seems a proposal of allowing Roman Catholic clergy to enter the Universities, however Burke points out the complications of such an idea that would be ultimately unsuitable; as he explains the rites, rituals, and theological dispositions which stand in great contrast to that of the establishment. Apparently the bill would enfranchise freeholders as an electorate presumably "forty-shilling freeholders", yet Burke argues: "There are few Catholic freeholders to take the benefit of the privilege, if they were permitted to partake it; but the manner in which this very right in freeholders at large is defended is not on the idea that the freeholders do really and truly represent the people, but that, all people being capable of obtaining freeholds, all those who by their industry and sobriety merit this privilege have the means of arriving at votes. It is the same with the corporations." Taking that into account assuming "the people" who were otherwise excluded from the fruits of their own industry have little opportunity to become said freeholders and participate in their own governance. Again Burke so eloquently exposes the reality of the people: "...such as it is, a great walk in life is forbidden ground to seventeen hundred thousand of the inhabitants of Ireland. Why are they excluded from the law? Do not they expend money in their suits? Why may not they indemnify themselves, by profiting, in the persons of some, for the losses incurred by others? Why may not they have persons of confidence, whom they may, if they please, employ in the agency of their affairs? The exclusion from the law, from grand juries, from sheriffships and under-sheriffships, as well as from freedom in any corporation, may subject them to dreadful hardships, as it may exclude them wholly from all that is beneficial and expose them to all that is mischievous in a trial by jury." As a source of Anglo-Irish political relations this letter is invaluable to understanding the times, and dissension which would later contribute to the Irish Rebellion of 1798. This letter is included in a volume with others (among 15 more volumes by Burke) available online via Project Gutenberg. This was my first experience reading Burke and I intend to read much of if not all of his letters and works: Project Gutenberg: Books by Burke, Edmund http://www.gutenberg.org/files/15700/...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    A pretty good but brief bit from Burke about the attempts to "reform" the English penal code in Ireland as it stood against native Irish Catholics. Burke's main concerns were that, even where the law attempted to lighten the severity, it resurrected some aspects of the law that were in disuse, not to mention those areas where it actually further disenfranchised the Irish. Burke makes a good point about government in general, and in this beats Frédéric Bastiat to the punch: When a government A pretty good but brief bit from Burke about the attempts to "reform" the English penal code in Ireland as it stood against native Irish Catholics. Burke's main concerns were that, even where the law attempted to lighten the severity, it resurrected some aspects of the law that were in disuse, not to mention those areas where it actually further disenfranchised the Irish. Burke makes a good point about government in general, and in this beats Frédéric Bastiat to the punch: When a government subsists (as governments formerly did) on an estate of its own, with but few and inconsiderable revenues drawn from the subject, then the few officers which existed in such establishments were naturally at the disposal of that government, which paid the salaries out of its own coffers: there an exclusive preference could hardly merit the name of proscription. Almost the whole produce of a man's industry at that time remained in his own purse to maintain his family. But times alter, and the whole estate of government is from private contribution. When a very great portion of the labor of individuals goes to the state, and is by the state again refunded to individuals, through the medium of offices, and in this circuitous progress from the private to the public, and from the public again to the private fund, the families from whom the revenue is taken are indemnified, and an equitable balance between the government and the subject is established. But if a great body of the people who contribute to this state lottery are excluded from all the prizes, the stopping the circulation with regard to them may be a most cruel hardship, amounting in effect to being double and treble taxed; and it will be felt as such to the very quick, by all the families, high and low, of those hundreds of thousands who are denied their chance in the returned fruits of their own industry. This is the thing meant by those who look upon the public revenue only as a spoil, and will naturally wish to have as few as possible concerned in the division of the booty. (location 38850-38861) I love the usage of "lottery," "spoil," and "booty," understanding the inevitability of corruption and populist handouts when it comes to big government! Otherwise the work is short and pretty straight forward, a decent read for the student of Burke or those interested in the English intervention in Ireland. I read this as part of Collected Works of Edmund Burke and the location reference above is to that. I cannot review all of the collection in under Goodreads' 20,000 character limit, so I break out reviews like this when possible.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carl Williams

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erick

  5. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Sinclair

  7. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  8. 5 out of 5

    Justin

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nikolaos Bezantakos

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cheri

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