counter create hit Gods Behaving Badly - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Gods Behaving Badly

Availability: Ready to download

Being a Greek god is not all it once was. Yes, the twelve gods of Olympus are alive and well in the twenty-first century, but they are crammed together in a London townhouse--and none too happy about it. And they've had to get day jobs: Artemis as a dog-walker, Apollo as a TV psychic, Aphrodite as a phone sex operator, Dionysus as a DJ. Even more disturbingly, their powers Being a Greek god is not all it once was. Yes, the twelve gods of Olympus are alive and well in the twenty-first century, but they are crammed together in a London townhouse--and none too happy about it. And they've had to get day jobs: Artemis as a dog-walker, Apollo as a TV psychic, Aphrodite as a phone sex operator, Dionysus as a DJ. Even more disturbingly, their powers are waning, and even turning mortals into trees--a favorite pastime of Apollo's--is sapping their vital reserves of strength. Soon, what begins as a minor squabble between Aphrodite and Apollo escalates into an epic battle of wills. Two perplexed humans, Alice and Neil, who are caught in the crossfire, must fear not only for their own lives, but for the survival of humankind. Nothing less than a true act of heroism is needed-but can these two decidedly ordinary people replicate the feats of the mythical heroes and save the world?


Compare

Being a Greek god is not all it once was. Yes, the twelve gods of Olympus are alive and well in the twenty-first century, but they are crammed together in a London townhouse--and none too happy about it. And they've had to get day jobs: Artemis as a dog-walker, Apollo as a TV psychic, Aphrodite as a phone sex operator, Dionysus as a DJ. Even more disturbingly, their powers Being a Greek god is not all it once was. Yes, the twelve gods of Olympus are alive and well in the twenty-first century, but they are crammed together in a London townhouse--and none too happy about it. And they've had to get day jobs: Artemis as a dog-walker, Apollo as a TV psychic, Aphrodite as a phone sex operator, Dionysus as a DJ. Even more disturbingly, their powers are waning, and even turning mortals into trees--a favorite pastime of Apollo's--is sapping their vital reserves of strength. Soon, what begins as a minor squabble between Aphrodite and Apollo escalates into an epic battle of wills. Two perplexed humans, Alice and Neil, who are caught in the crossfire, must fear not only for their own lives, but for the survival of humankind. Nothing less than a true act of heroism is needed-but can these two decidedly ordinary people replicate the feats of the mythical heroes and save the world?

30 review for Gods Behaving Badly

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    After reading Gods Behaving Badly, I began asking my friends if they have a favorite Greek god or goddess. I was trying to determine my own level of geekiness. I suspect the average person today does not have a preference and may not even be able to name more than one or two of the gods. Fortunately for me, most of my friends can not only name several members of the Greek pantheon, but also were more than willing to enumerate the many reasons they prefer their favorite over all the others. Havin After reading Gods Behaving Badly, I began asking my friends if they have a favorite Greek god or goddess. I was trying to determine my own level of geekiness. I suspect the average person today does not have a preference and may not even be able to name more than one or two of the gods. Fortunately for me, most of my friends can not only name several members of the Greek pantheon, but also were more than willing to enumerate the many reasons they prefer their favorite over all the others. Having a favorite may make me a geek, but at least I'm not too much geekier than most of my friends. If you, too, cannot only name several of the Greek gods and goddesses but also have a personal favorite, you absolutely must read Gods Behaving Badly. If you don't have a favorite or can't name many of them, you should think about reading this book anyway. The plot is good, the characters are excellent, and the writing, especially the dialogue, is hilarious, frequently a bit crude in keeping with the old legends, and filled with fantastic one-liners. Gods Behaving Badly is never going to be a considered a classic work of literature, but it is a fun and enjoyable quick read. Gods Behaving Badly is based on the premise that the Greek immortals were real and, as immortals, are still alive and well in the modern day. Or at least, they're mostly well. Their powers have been on the decline for centuries and they've also been stuck living together in a now decrepit house in London since around the 1600s. Since most people have long since forgotten the Greek pantheon, and those that remember don't believe the gods and goddesses are real, they've been forced to take odd jobs to provide for their own upkeep and have fallen far from their former glory. Artemis is a dog walker, Apollo is a TV psychic, Aphrodite is a phone sex operator, and Dionysius runs the hottest night club in London, just to name a few. Seemingly only Ares (god of war) and Hermes (god of money and responsible for conducting souls to the underworld, among other tasks) are kept busy with their actual divine duties. As with several of the old legends, the plot is set in motion by various sexual escapades of the gods, here mostly Apollo, that cause unforeseen mayhem. Immortals face-off against other immortals, pulling hapless mortals into their battles at whim, until ultimately minor differences must be set aside and efforts made to recreate the heroic feats of old to prevent the destruction of the world. I highly recommend this novel for any fan of Greek mythology. Comparing Phillips' take on the gods in modern times and the fully-fleshed out personalities she has given them to how I might imagine them and watching how she riffed on the old stories added to my enjoyment of the novel. Those unfamiliar with the Greek stories might not get as much out of the novel but I think they can still enjoy it as a fun and well told story that might ignite a desire to read some of legends that served as inspiration. Oh, for the record, my favorite of the gods has always been Hermes. He is a major B character in Gods Behaving Badly and I love what Phillips has done with him.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    This was indeed Fluff with a capital F. For most of the novel, the pages flipped over like the wind was turning them. It wasn't that it was that suspenseful or anything, it was just such easy, frothy reading that it just fell through your fingers without you really noticing. It did get a bit heavy in the middle, but probably appropriately so, given events. That was the only time it dragged a little. Essentially: Think of this like a whipped cream dessert version of American Gods. Same basic conce This was indeed Fluff with a capital F. For most of the novel, the pages flipped over like the wind was turning them. It wasn't that it was that suspenseful or anything, it was just such easy, frothy reading that it just fell through your fingers without you really noticing. It did get a bit heavy in the middle, but probably appropriately so, given events. That was the only time it dragged a little. Essentially: Think of this like a whipped cream dessert version of American Gods. Same basic concept: old gods, people don't believe anymore, powers being lost. Then a Regular Joe human (in this case, its two humans- who have a romance plot that drives the action) is thrown into the mix and makes his/her bewildered way through this world they thought was fake to find themselves and the truth, etc, etc. Only, its taken very literally, and set kind of into the format of an old Greek legend. Which is fitting because this book is about the Greek gods of legend being transplanted into modern day London, where they've supposedly lived since the years of the Renaissance. (The Gods speak in modern day British cant. Which is odd, but I got over it.) And they hadn't quite figured out why they were losing their powers yet. Its sort of a fun little look into Greek mythology for people who've never experienced it before. The book gives you all the information you need to know about the gods, if you've never come across them before. Of course, if you have, its all the funnier. The book definitely raids all the characteristics of the old legends. Good times. Recommended for a sunny Sunday afternoon.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mir

    The gods of Olympus are real, and they're just as spiteful, petty, and self-centered as myths depict. They live in a run-down London townhouse, and shy Alice is the unfortunate mortal they hire to clean the place. Neil wishes he could be more than a friend to Alice, but is too timid to ask her out. But when Alice and the entire world may be destroyed, Neil will dare anything to save them. Neil and Alice are introduced in a scene where they are visiting in her cleaning cupboard: "Suddenly Alice's The gods of Olympus are real, and they're just as spiteful, petty, and self-centered as myths depict. They live in a run-down London townhouse, and shy Alice is the unfortunate mortal they hire to clean the place. Neil wishes he could be more than a friend to Alice, but is too timid to ask her out. But when Alice and the entire world may be destroyed, Neil will dare anything to save them. Neil and Alice are introduced in a scene where they are visiting in her cleaning cupboard: "Suddenly Alice's face fell. "Oh dear. I hope you're not going to get bored in here, with only me to talk to." "No!" said Neil. "Not at all. Please don't think that. Actually, I was just thinking the same thing myself. I mean, you, about me. I mean, you getting bored." "Oh no," whispered Alice. "I don't find you boring at all, Neil. Not a bit." In the kind of novels that Neil sometimes read in secret, this would be the moment when the hero took the heroine into his arms, pressed his lips roughly to hers, and then ravished her. "I've got Scrabble on my Palm Pilot," he said. "Multiplayer."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    This novel opens with so much promise: the Greek gods living in modern London, bored and barely able to sustain themselves. We get some of the classic elements demanded by such a project- rogue love interests, fighting, revenge, jealousy. However the book fizzles at the helm of predictability, unlikable characters, and just plain poor writing. I did not come in with high expectations; I wanted an easy, enjoyable read. Readers definitely get the easy part, but any joy I got out of this novel was This novel opens with so much promise: the Greek gods living in modern London, bored and barely able to sustain themselves. We get some of the classic elements demanded by such a project- rogue love interests, fighting, revenge, jealousy. However the book fizzles at the helm of predictability, unlikable characters, and just plain poor writing. I did not come in with high expectations; I wanted an easy, enjoyable read. Readers definitely get the easy part, but any joy I got out of this novel was squandered by its sell-out ending. I'll give it one star for a creative concept and a few interesting literary devices, but on the whole this book was a disappointment.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    "Gods Behaving Badly" had an awesome concept, an okay delivery, and a flat ending. I'm an avid fan of Greek mythology, and this book starts out with a lot of promise. Unfortunately, in reading the book, I felt as though the author had assembled all of the horses for the Kentucky Derby, then put them on the Indy 500 Speedway and said, "Okay, GO!" There just wasn't that much cohesion in the book, and no characters really stood out, which is such a huge shame, because we're talking about *gods* here "Gods Behaving Badly" had an awesome concept, an okay delivery, and a flat ending. I'm an avid fan of Greek mythology, and this book starts out with a lot of promise. Unfortunately, in reading the book, I felt as though the author had assembled all of the horses for the Kentucky Derby, then put them on the Indy 500 Speedway and said, "Okay, GO!" There just wasn't that much cohesion in the book, and no characters really stood out, which is such a huge shame, because we're talking about *gods* here. The ending was a disappointment in that you were left scratching your head as to why the gods, narcissistic though they were, didn't have the wherewithal to think of that solution *sometime* in the past millennium. I'm not sorry that I read it, but I definitely wouldn't buy the book. I'm very glad it was a library read. Note: I read Robert Asprin's "Dragons Wild", a new, humorous take on dragon mythology, immediately after this book, and was struck by how well it succeeded in tackling an old concept and making it vibrant and engaging to read. I wish I'd been able to say that same about "Gods Behaving Badly".

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jaline

    The Greek gods of myth (who would be very offended at being called myths) are in exile in London with their powers in decline. Apollo is taking the fall for global warming and Artemis, as goddess of the hunt, is almost out of a job with weapons controls tightening and hunting as sport declining. All of them (except maybe for Dionysus, god of wine and revelry) are finding their time of usefulness winding down and their powers weakening. As always when time is marked by thousands of years rather th The Greek gods of myth (who would be very offended at being called myths) are in exile in London with their powers in decline. Apollo is taking the fall for global warming and Artemis, as goddess of the hunt, is almost out of a job with weapons controls tightening and hunting as sport declining. All of them (except maybe for Dionysus, god of wine and revelry) are finding their time of usefulness winding down and their powers weakening. As always when time is marked by thousands of years rather than centuries, and with too little to do coupled with fears about their diminished status and abilities, they scrap and battle and intrigue among themselves, shifting viewpoints and alliances faster than starting a new chapter in a book. Things start to go from ‘normal’ in-fighting to mayhem when they get mortals involved in their conflict. This is strictly against the rules but out of frustration, boredom and fear they seem to be making up their own. About one quarter of the way in, the initial impression I had of tongue in cheek gradually changed. I actually began to believe in these characters and understand them somewhat. There was an interesting sojourn in the underworld and with what led up to it and all that transpired there, I became caught up in the story and the people (gods, goddesses, and mortals) in it. If this is on your reading list, I recommend tackling it. I’m glad I didn’t give up – reading this is like a hero’s journey and the reward is satisfying.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    This story reads like the novelization of a comic book. It's short on thoughtfulness and introspection and long on silly action/romance scenes. Marie Phillips does provide a funny take on what life would be like for the fading Olympians: slummy home in London, imbalanced relationships, lots of time spent plotting revenge. Some of the gods have to get jobs to maintain their minimal lifestyle, so Apollo works as a TV psychic, Artemis walks dogs, and Dionysus owns a night club. Zeus spends most of This story reads like the novelization of a comic book. It's short on thoughtfulness and introspection and long on silly action/romance scenes. Marie Phillips does provide a funny take on what life would be like for the fading Olympians: slummy home in London, imbalanced relationships, lots of time spent plotting revenge. Some of the gods have to get jobs to maintain their minimal lifestyle, so Apollo works as a TV psychic, Artemis walks dogs, and Dionysus owns a night club. Zeus spends most of his time in front of the TV watching soaps, while Eros converts to Christianity. But all these amusing slivers fail to add up to anything more complex or interesting. The book drags on as the light-hearted first half gives way to a ridiculous plot to save the world. (Spoiler: the world doesn't end and everyone lives happily ever after.) Nothing in the story invites the reader to dig deeper into the nature of the gods, their relationship with humans, or even to reflect on how terrible life would be if the Greek gods do regain their power. If you just want a fun story with nods to mythology, you might enjoy this book. Otherwise, move along, there's nothing more to see here.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Gods Behaving Badly is a diverting little romp for those who love mythology and legend. However, while enjoyable (and I did laugh out loud a few times--Eros is a born again Christian, how great is that?), the novelty of the inventive premise wears a little thin halfway through the book and culminates in a less than climactic ending. It's entertaining summer reading, but nothing too profound or world altering. However, sometimes that's the type of book that perfectly fits the bill. Gods Behaving Badly is a diverting little romp for those who love mythology and legend. However, while enjoyable (and I did laugh out loud a few times--Eros is a born again Christian, how great is that?), the novelty of the inventive premise wears a little thin halfway through the book and culminates in a less than climactic ending. It's entertaining summer reading, but nothing too profound or world altering. However, sometimes that's the type of book that perfectly fits the bill.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bunny

    I have a serious hard-on for all things involving mythology. 1-17 - I am in love. And lust. And my nipples got a little hard. Sorry, all of Aphrodite's phone sex got me a little excited. This book is so clever, and so funny, and I'm insanely jealous that this is Marie Phillips' first book. As a lover of mythology, this books make me laugh entirely too hard. Alice and Neil were so adorable. I loved how meek and quiet the both of them were. The meek shall inherit the earth someday, but they saved it I have a serious hard-on for all things involving mythology. 1-17 - I am in love. And lust. And my nipples got a little hard. Sorry, all of Aphrodite's phone sex got me a little excited. This book is so clever, and so funny, and I'm insanely jealous that this is Marie Phillips' first book. As a lover of mythology, this books make me laugh entirely too hard. Alice and Neil were so adorable. I loved how meek and quiet the both of them were. The meek shall inherit the earth someday, but they saved it from a crazed, egotistical god who turns women into trees because they refuse to give him blowjobs. So clever and hilarious. And yay for Persephone, who is my favorite goddess.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    The Greek gods are still with us, but as no one worships them anymore they are reduced to living in a squalid house in London. They have become a dysfunctional family, who only care about themselves. Alice and Neil, two mortals, find themselves falling in love only to be separated by death. Neil must descend into the Underworld to bring Alice back to life. “I ought to eat your soul right now,” said Hades, “only I just had my lunch.” As well as rescuing Alice the sun had gone out! Greek gods in modern The Greek gods are still with us, but as no one worships them anymore they are reduced to living in a squalid house in London. They have become a dysfunctional family, who only care about themselves. Alice and Neil, two mortals, find themselves falling in love only to be separated by death. Neil must descend into the Underworld to bring Alice back to life. “I ought to eat your soul right now,” said Hades, “only I just had my lunch.” As well as rescuing Alice the sun had gone out! Greek gods in modern London - a hilarious combination. Enjoy!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    Having grown up on D'Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths, I was totally thrilled with this campy premise. The first page shares the interesting news that New York now houses the now diminished members of Greece's family of Gods: Zeus, Hera, Artemis & Apollo, and oh yes! Aphrodite. . . .every few pages on the phone with her best phone-sex voice and script while communicating with others in the room. Knocked me out of my chair. . .hilarious! BUT as amused as I was, this is the type of quirky style that Having grown up on D'Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths, I was totally thrilled with this campy premise. The first page shares the interesting news that New York now houses the now diminished members of Greece's family of Gods: Zeus, Hera, Artemis & Apollo, and oh yes! Aphrodite. . . .every few pages on the phone with her best phone-sex voice and script while communicating with others in the room. Knocked me out of my chair. . .hilarious! BUT as amused as I was, this is the type of quirky style that some of my peeps would roll out their "We are NOT amused" faces, complete with pursed lips (has to be painful when it is that tightly held). Surprisingly, they don't tolerate much belief suspension in spite of their crazy life choices. Go figure. Ah well - if you like the Greek pantheon - and even if you are not very familiar, there are little thumbnail bits that could catch up those who didn't have a D'Aulaires in childhood. . .you will enjoy this romp. I loved the bits with Hermes - he's the one I'd like keep in our day. Like to see him manage things in Washington . . . . . Anyway. There is a nice, quirky love story which is the ladder upon which the story marches - down to . . .hell?. . . and back. And concludes with a VERY cool resolve right there on the edges of Central Park. Nice job Ms. Phillips. I'm going to look up your other works! I'm still giggling. 4 stars.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    When I first started listening to this audiobook, I cringed just about every second because of the authors "He said, she said" style of writing. It probably wouldn't be so obvious if you were actually reading the written words, but listening to it is quite annoying. Fake example: "Hello, said Artemis." "Hi, said Apollo." "What are you up to, said Artemis?" "Not much, said Apollo." Okay - I think you should get the picture. It really became annoying for me but after about 4 hours of listening, it When I first started listening to this audiobook, I cringed just about every second because of the authors "He said, she said" style of writing. It probably wouldn't be so obvious if you were actually reading the written words, but listening to it is quite annoying. Fake example: "Hello, said Artemis." "Hi, said Apollo." "What are you up to, said Artemis?" "Not much, said Apollo." Okay - I think you should get the picture. It really became annoying for me but after about 4 hours of listening, it started to become funny and I actually started, "He said"-ing and "she said"-ing right along with her. As you may know from some of my other reviews, I really enjoy listening to Rosalyn Landor. She is a fabulous narrator and really adds a lot to the story - so much so that I probably would have returned this audio book after the first 20 "he saids" if it weren't for her. On the definite positive side, this work of fiction actually helped me quite a bit with remembering who was who in the world of Greek Mythology, which is something I've currently been struggling with. The story in itself was okay. There was one thing that happened at the very beginning that actually set everything else in the story in motion and that one thing was never brought up again at the end. I don't get why not!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Serena

    Marie Phillips' Gods Behaving Badly is one of the funniest books I've read in a long time. What would the ancient gods of Greece and Rome do in today's 21st Century world? Aphrodite, the Goddess of Love, a phone sex operator; Apollo, the God of the Sun, a television psychic; Artemis, Goddess of the Hunt and Chastity, a dog walker. The gods have weakened since their days on high at Mt. Olympus, and they are all crammed into a dilapidated home in London, getting on one another's nerves. The conflic Marie Phillips' Gods Behaving Badly is one of the funniest books I've read in a long time. What would the ancient gods of Greece and Rome do in today's 21st Century world? Aphrodite, the Goddess of Love, a phone sex operator; Apollo, the God of the Sun, a television psychic; Artemis, Goddess of the Hunt and Chastity, a dog walker. The gods have weakened since their days on high at Mt. Olympus, and they are all crammed into a dilapidated home in London, getting on one another's nerves. The conflict truly begins one night during a taping of Apollo's psychic show where Eros shoots a love arrow into Apollo's heart, leaving him powerless against his love for the next person entering his view. Unfortunately, that person happens to be a mortal named, Alice, who cleans the theater where the show is taped. Alice and her friend Neil, who both love one another but are too afraid to make a move, become the center of conflict in the gods' world. Watching these gods cope with the 21st Century is a hilarious delight, but even more delightful is Phillips' use of language on the page. From Aphrodite's bottom "bouncing like two hard-boiled eggs dancing a tango" (page 89) to her description of Neil as a teenager, "an ugly, spotty, skinny-arsed spoddy minger" (page 88). The dialogue is witty as well: "'. . .you'd better come quick. I've got a god passed out on my kitchen floor and I think the world's about to end.' (page 213)." One of the best scenes in this book comes when Apollo finds Zeus in the upper floors of the house staring at the television much like a zombie would. He's lifeless, but still a god able to stand on his own and still strike down mortals with lightning. Reading this section brought to life the dilemma that often faces many of us, do we unwind too often in front of the television rather than through more challenging activities, like games, competition, reading, and exercise? Is this section a commentary on the lives we continue to lead now, watching television, zoning out, and withdrawing into ourselves away from society. But, I digress. With an interesting cast of characters from a Christian Eros to a drunk, DJ in Dionysus, Phillips uses her cast of characters to dramatically set the stage for a modern day Greek comedy of errors and missed chances. Even readers who do not have a firm background in mythology will enjoy this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    JenniferD

    Gods Behaving Badly is an imperfect but entertaining book for those looking for a light (and a bit smutty) escape.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sleepless Dreamer

    Heck yeah, finished my reading challenge! And before I start uni, as I'd hoped! Set in modern-day London, this book talks about Greek gods living in our times and struggling with the loss of their powers and of everyone's faith in them. This book is like a combination of Percy Jackson and Matt Haig's How to Stop Time. It's an adult novel but it's perfect for those people who grew up reading Percy Jackson and miss that style of Greek myths coming to life modernly. The writing style is, to be honest Heck yeah, finished my reading challenge! And before I start uni, as I'd hoped! Set in modern-day London, this book talks about Greek gods living in our times and struggling with the loss of their powers and of everyone's faith in them. This book is like a combination of Percy Jackson and Matt Haig's How to Stop Time. It's an adult novel but it's perfect for those people who grew up reading Percy Jackson and miss that style of Greek myths coming to life modernly. The writing style is, to be honest, not amazing but it works. There's this type of dry humor throughout the book that really makes it work. The characterization is creative and funny, from Eros being a reborn Christian, to everything Athena is, to Artemis being such a bad-ass. I didn't like Neil and Alice in the beginning. They struck me as every stereotype that pops into my head when I think about British people (rule obliging, polite, introverted, unable to speak up about important things, well put together..). Like dang it, Alice, can't you see Artemis is messing around with you? However, as the book goes on, I found myself falling in love with them. That's impressive. I found Neil's humor to be stellar and Alice's can-do attitude inspiring. She's just so chill. The combination of Neil with the Greek gods was great. All in all, this is a nice read. It's very soft. There's a twist in the middle that caught me entirely off guard and I loved it. I think this will appeal both to Greek mythology fans and also to people that aren't that big of fans. What I'm Taking with Me - The end made me so happy. - I fear I won't remember the story in a week but still, at the time, I did enjoy this. - There's something great about a normal guy becoming a hero. - I'll say it though: there will be no better Hades than the one in Disney's Heracles. I will fight everyone on this. So as I'm starting uni tomorrow, I figured this is a good place to write down a few predictions. Sometime in the future, I'll stumble upon this and get such a kick out of reading this and seeing how wrong I am. - I'm going to relearn that I'm not very good at Philosophy but that nothing will take away my love for it, even if that's not how my brain works. - Econ is going to be freaking hard, I'll probably fail something there, but I'll love it and enjoy getting that perspective. - Politics, on the other hand, is going to disappoint me. I'll come very hopeful to class but eventually, end up feeling like the entire field is a dead end. - My uni is famous for being impossible to navigate in but if by the end of my first month there, I won't have the hang of it, I'll be upset. - My dorm room will be a huge mess within a week despite me having nothing in it. - Sometime next week it will hit me that I'm finally in uni and I'll freak out, make a huge list of things to do, and then will hide in the library, panicking about life. -Speaking of which, sometime within my first few weeks there, I'll find a library spot that I like and then promptly stay there for my next three (or maybe four, depends if I end up doing a Masters in Business). - I'm really struggling to picture what kind of student I'm going to be but I'm pretty excited to find out.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Some school subjects enter your brain through the front door, find themselves a room and quickly prove themselves useful; cleaning out the cobwebs of mental inconsistency or forming dynamic, working friendships with academics from other fields. 'How did we ever get along without Algebra?' the denizens of my brain might have said during a particularly anthropomorphic moment 'he works so well with World History, Psychology and Creative Writing.' But Greek Mythology was one of those subjects (along Some school subjects enter your brain through the front door, find themselves a room and quickly prove themselves useful; cleaning out the cobwebs of mental inconsistency or forming dynamic, working friendships with academics from other fields. 'How did we ever get along without Algebra?' the denizens of my brain might have said during a particularly anthropomorphic moment 'he works so well with World History, Psychology and Creative Writing.' But Greek Mythology was one of those subjects (along with Spanish, Geometry and Biology) that never found a home in my mind. They'd knock at the door and ask to come in, but the sales pitch always fell flat. 'Hello, my name is Greek Mythology and have I got a deal for you! Capricious Gods! Haphazard fables! Arbitrarily-named constellations! And all part of a religion that nobody believes in anymore! Sound like fun?' To lots of people, sure, but it never clicked for me. Enter Gods Behaving Badly via that circuitous reading route; a holiday gift exchange. 'A near-pantheon of Gods forced to live together in a London town house? Wow, Greek Mythology AND a reality TV-style comic setup?' I thought as I felt my eyes glaze over. Yet this novel proves both hilarious and human. Turns out all that arbitrary God-logic can make for some delightfully absurd situations when forced into the modern world. And all the petty plotting fuels real human feeling when the author writes the manipulated mortals with skill and compassion. This novel scales my personal humor Mount Olympus to take it's place beside The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy as one of the funniest books I've ever read. In doing so, it knocks one more peg out from the old 'women aren't as funny as men' canard while helping me appreciate a literary subject I'd long found mystifying. I'd say that's an accomplishment worthy of myth.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Pickstone

    Well! This is definitely in my 'best books of 2016' list right away! What a phenomenally imaginative and creative approach to the modern day of the Greek gods - makes Rick Riordan look like an amateur. This is very, very funny - though not laugh out loud (I rarely do). And there is a bonus at the end! MP gives one of the best descriptions of the creative process that I have ever seen - and that is humorous too. It certainly sounds a lot like me trying to get to grips with a painting! Well! This is definitely in my 'best books of 2016' list right away! What a phenomenally imaginative and creative approach to the modern day of the Greek gods - makes Rick Riordan look like an amateur. This is very, very funny - though not laugh out loud (I rarely do). And there is a bonus at the end! MP gives one of the best descriptions of the creative process that I have ever seen - and that is humorous too. It certainly sounds a lot like me trying to get to grips with a painting!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Willow Madison

    Read this ages ago, but it's been wiggling in my brain recently with a different mythology remake book. I loved this one. Only giving it a 4* because for the life of me, I can't remember the ending...so I figure it must've been somethin' not quite to my lurvin' *shrug* The Gods/esses were true to their ancient selves and the modern world take on their powers, personalities and interactions was awesome! Read this ages ago, but it's been wiggling in my brain recently with a different mythology remake book. I loved this one. Only giving it a 4* because for the life of me, I can't remember the ending...so I figure it must've been somethin' not quite to my lurvin' *shrug* The Gods/esses were true to their ancient selves and the modern world take on their powers, personalities and interactions was awesome!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sabin

    It's a fine book for a light weekend read. The book is very well paced and although the plot is basically boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl, the overarching plot of greek gods mingled with present day humanity gives it a bit of flavour. It may have been that the plot was too straightforward for my taste, but it felt a bit too rushed and fairy-tale perfect in its conclusion. It's a fine book for a light weekend read. The book is very well paced and although the plot is basically boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl, the overarching plot of greek gods mingled with present day humanity gives it a bit of flavour. It may have been that the plot was too straightforward for my taste, but it felt a bit too rushed and fairy-tale perfect in its conclusion.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (Giraffe Days)

    I've always considered the Greek gods to be one of the earliest incarnations of the soap opera: the large, tight-knit and incestuous family full of backstabbing, trickery, deceit, love, lust, betrayal, vanity, bravery and chiselled jawlines. They're perfect for a piss-take, and in Gods Behaving Badly Phillips has done a marvellous job of sending them up - all while making you like them just a little bit. Acting on the premise that the Greek gods are still around, still making the sun shine and so I've always considered the Greek gods to be one of the earliest incarnations of the soap opera: the large, tight-knit and incestuous family full of backstabbing, trickery, deceit, love, lust, betrayal, vanity, bravery and chiselled jawlines. They're perfect for a piss-take, and in Gods Behaving Badly Phillips has done a marvellous job of sending them up - all while making you like them just a little bit. Acting on the premise that the Greek gods are still around, still making the sun shine and so on, but definitely out of favour, they're now scattered across the globe with a group living in a rundown, rat-infested, filthy old house in London. Artemis, goddess of hunting and celibacy, has a job as a dog-walker. Her brother Apollo is just as vain as ever but thinks he can make a career as a TV psychic - despite the fact that his psychic powers have pretty much gone. Aphrodite, the temptress, does phone sex for money. They're a sulky bunch of slovenly gods who have pretty much all lost their godlike powers - simply existing and making the sun come up is about all they can manage these days. Caught up in their inwardly-focused webs of intrigue is a short, meek cleaner called Alice and her would-be boyfriend, Neil, mole-like and also short. When Alice knocks on the gods' door, looking for a new cleaning job, they are both caught up in the deities' latest schemes - Aphrodite's revenge on Apollo, Apollo's revenge on the cleaner for saying No to him, and Artemis' plans to save them all. It's a mess alright, but in their new interaction with two unlikely heroic humans could lie the answer to all their prayers. This was wonderful fun, and just the kind of book I needed: funny, irreverent, lively, silly yet still smarter than Apollo. The gods are never easy characters to like - they are the Greek gods, after all, not humans, and don't have the same range of compassionate leanings we tend to have. They've fallen low, very low, and the seedy powerlessness of their modern-day lives gives you some small measure of satisfaction - except when Apollo turns women into trees for turning him down, of course. (The concept of "with great power comes great responsibility" hasn't ever occurred to them and would be laughed at if they heard it.) Artemis is the only one of them who is at all likeable, though even she is limited by her designation (being goddess of celibacy can make her a bit of a drag, though she makes up for it with her fighting prowess). Apollo is the true comic relief, but the other gods who make appearances are all just as hopeless and vindictive, really. Yet fun because of it. Next to them, the two human characters's naïveté and meekness is nothing other than cute and endearing. Halfway through, the book becomes a classic fantasy adventure story, descending into the underworld for a rescue mission and a test of heroism. At times the story was a little too simple and vacuous for me, but then I reminded myself that that was what I wanted and to stop over-thinking it. The ending is predictable, but still satisfying and applicable to any and all religions: gods only have power if you give it to them. They only exist in your head, after all (yes, so speaks the resident atheist here). If you're after a light, fun and quick read, a beach read perhaps, this would fit the bill. It's funny and sweet, has a great sense of humour and lively antics, balanced with a touch of tragedy, not to mention a spot of adventure and daring and, yes, even romance - it's charming.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lolly's Library

    I have been having the hardest time coming up with a review for this book. It's not because I didn't like it; quite the contrary, it was very entertaining. It's like... well, is it possible to make Cool Whip out of Greek yogurt? Because that's what this book is, fluff with a Greek flavor. It's a distant cousin to Neil Gaiman's American Gods in that it has many of the same elements--ancient gods living in modern times, weakened in power because no one believes in them anymore, as well a mortal (o I have been having the hardest time coming up with a review for this book. It's not because I didn't like it; quite the contrary, it was very entertaining. It's like... well, is it possible to make Cool Whip out of Greek yogurt? Because that's what this book is, fluff with a Greek flavor. It's a distant cousin to Neil Gaiman's American Gods in that it has many of the same elements--ancient gods living in modern times, weakened in power because no one believes in them anymore, as well a mortal (or, in the case of Gods Behaving Badly, two mortals) thrown in the mix, one of whom becomes "The Hero" who manages to rescue the damsel in distress and solve whatever problem is fueling the plot--just in a slightly "fluffier" version. The gods in this novel are Greek (if you hadn't guessed), specifically the big 12 (the major gods of Olympus we've all heard about, one way or another) who are currently crowded together in a run-down London townhouse. They've fallen on hard times in the last thousand years or so and, my, how the mighty do fall: Artemis spends her time as a dog-walker, always looking for that one, modern dog which still has a trace of wolf in it and is always disappointed by the poor idiots; Dionysus still makes his own wine, but does a lot more damage with it in his role as nightclub owner, where his wine is the only thing on tap and weird, grotesque, erotic floor shows are the entertainment, which explains the club's draw; Hephaestus is still a mighty craftsman, though most of his efforts go into improvements around the house such as fixing broken furniture and improving the bathroom fittings; Aphrodite works off her mighty sex drive as a phone sex operator, panting, moaning, and faux-orgasming into her mobile phone at any time of day, to the disgust of Artemis; and Apollo has taken his Oracle to television, in a low-budget show where the set was "held together with safety pins and masking tape" and, just as in the good ol' days, the sybils did all the work. It's at the taping of the first (and last) episode of this show that Eros, who's now a Christian and suffering an existential crisis because of this, shoots an arrow of love into Apollo's heart at the behest of Aphrodite in a fit of "woman scorned" anger. Apollo falls instantly in love with Alice, a cleaner who's sneaked her friend, Neil, and herself onto the soundstage. Thus begins the complications and the drama: Alice is fired from the TV station, Neil convinces her to go freelance with her cleaning skills, as a result of which she ends up at the gods' townhouse where she's hired by Artemis and gleefully stalked by Apollo as he tries to convince the rather mousy woman of his love for her. And so the adventure begins. This is a fun and funny book; it's entertaining and a quick read. While it may not offer up any great moments of genius, there's a tremendous amount of skill shown in the actual writing: clever and occasionally witty prose, authentic characters, and a story which evokes a genuine emotional involvement in the reader. (Yes, even in fluff, such things are possible.) Considering that this is a first novel, the high level of talent in Marie Phillips' writing is pleasantly unexpected.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    The novels a hoot with many a LOL moment. It's an easy, quick read, but has much to say about the human condition, the myth of monotheism and the politics of religion. The Olympians are presented as weak immortals living in slum-like conditions in modern London, actually as part of the masses who support and maintain the glittering façade masquerading as any 'great' city. The author has taken a simplistic approach giving these deities their most obvious attributes and using these as their person The novels a hoot with many a LOL moment. It's an easy, quick read, but has much to say about the human condition, the myth of monotheism and the politics of religion. The Olympians are presented as weak immortals living in slum-like conditions in modern London, actually as part of the masses who support and maintain the glittering façade masquerading as any 'great' city. The author has taken a simplistic approach giving these deities their most obvious attributes and using these as their personalities and behaviors. Thus Dionysos is a drunken bar owner where one can watch any sexual behavior ever dreamed of by mortals; Artemis is a celibate, strong female athlete responsible for the moon phases, menses, and her beloved animals; Apollo is responsible for the Sun shining and a sexual athlete of blinding beauty, etc. What I find interesting about these archetypes and how the author fleshed them out, is that for each, I have known someone who fits their personality profile. They come across as human personality archetypes we have all known. It's obvious the author criticizes and has problems with modern organized monotheism, especially the cult of Jesus which she slams at every opportunity. The big message for religious types is that gods exist only because they are believed in. The power of human belief gives the gods their power, both miraculous and political. The novel suggests a way the Olympians can regain their power at the expense of monotheism and Jesus in particular. The only flaw I see if the simplicity by which the Greek gods are presented. Dionysos and his religion, e.g., was highly complex and difficult for moderns to truly get Him intuitively. Here he is treated simply as a drunken pervert. I'm sure the author knows he was much more complex and used this simplified Dionysos as a means for her novel. Or perhaps He was simple since so few of us still believe in Him and has fallen into the gutter. One final thought which illustrates the book: I should have read this edition, instead of this one the former is much more appealing, representing Apollo and Aphrodite. Highly recommended.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Djrmel

    It's a setting that just full of possibilities: the Greek Gods of Olympus are still around and most of the principles are living in a rundown house in modern London. With characters like Apollo and Athena and Hermes, there's no end to complications and plot twists, right? Phillips does come up with jobs suitable of her cast - Aphrodite as a phone sex operator just makes perfect sense. And if Apollo and Aphrodite live in the same house, they probably would end up having sex with each other, consi It's a setting that just full of possibilities: the Greek Gods of Olympus are still around and most of the principles are living in a rundown house in modern London. With characters like Apollo and Athena and Hermes, there's no end to complications and plot twists, right? Phillips does come up with jobs suitable of her cast - Aphrodite as a phone sex operator just makes perfect sense. And if Apollo and Aphrodite live in the same house, they probably would end up having sex with each other, considering their particular strengths, and despite being half siblings. Altogether, wouldn't we expect the whole clan to be just as dysfunctional in this age as the one they originated in? But that's the problem with this book - the characters do act all too often just as you'd expect. They have almost no arc. I guess that's the problem with characters so deitic - they have no where to go but down, and if that's not your ending, you really don't have much of a story. There are two mortals that get mixed up with this crazy family, and they do have a journey, but you'd think with people like Zeus and Hades getting involved, the whole thing would be more.....epic?

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vignesh Kumar

    3.5 Stars... I got this book in a fair by its cover and the blurb. As it said, this is really funny and hilarious to read. I had my share of LOL moments. I liked this book really. This is a story of the Greek gods living in the 21st century with their powers limited. Artemis is the dog-walker and Apollo is the host of a kind-of pathetic, old prophetic TV show. The funny thing is Aphrodite, who works as a phone sex worker. Their life changes after a meeting with a cleaner named Alice and her like-t 3.5 Stars... I got this book in a fair by its cover and the blurb. As it said, this is really funny and hilarious to read. I had my share of LOL moments. I liked this book really. This is a story of the Greek gods living in the 21st century with their powers limited. Artemis is the dog-walker and Apollo is the host of a kind-of pathetic, old prophetic TV show. The funny thing is Aphrodite, who works as a phone sex worker. Their life changes after a meeting with a cleaner named Alice and her like-to-be boyfriend, Nick. The writing is really good and hilarious and turns out serious towards the end. I liked the way each of the Greek gods depicted. I expected more, as in more serious actions, tragedies and stuff. If you want to have a funny, light read, read this.

  25. 5 out of 5

    David

    This book had a great concept, but the execution was disappointing. If your main premise is that a dozen of the ancient Greek gods are still alive and living in squalor in a dilapidated house in London, it seems that there should be more fun to be had than that provided by Marie Phillips in this effort. Enjoyable, but entirely forgettable, "Gods Behaving Badly" did not fulfil the promise suggested by its very clever underlying conceit. This book had a great concept, but the execution was disappointing. If your main premise is that a dozen of the ancient Greek gods are still alive and living in squalor in a dilapidated house in London, it seems that there should be more fun to be had than that provided by Marie Phillips in this effort. Enjoyable, but entirely forgettable, "Gods Behaving Badly" did not fulfil the promise suggested by its very clever underlying conceit.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    Yuck. I picked this up because it was on a recommended list somewhere, but I cannot for the life of me figure out why or by whom. There really is nothing redeeming about this book other than that it took absolutely no concentration and about 3 hours cover to cover. The premise lacks originality: there are tons of books about Greek Gods in modern times. The "plot twist" is completely predictable, also unoriginal and contains no surprises...really of course Gods lose their power if no one believes Yuck. I picked this up because it was on a recommended list somewhere, but I cannot for the life of me figure out why or by whom. There really is nothing redeeming about this book other than that it took absolutely no concentration and about 3 hours cover to cover. The premise lacks originality: there are tons of books about Greek Gods in modern times. The "plot twist" is completely predictable, also unoriginal and contains no surprises...really of course Gods lose their power if no one believes in them (at least they aren't fairies who are prone to drop dead randomly as one person professes disbelief). The writing is annoyingly simple, cliched, and almost sitcom-esque in its attempt at humor such as: "'Would the two of you stop swooning over each other and please hurry up?' said Artemis. 'We all know you're in love, but in case you hadn't noticed, the world is ending. The love will keep.'" As if that is not enough, there are internal inconsistencies in the story. Clearly Apollo is responsible for the sun and early in the book Artemis makes a snide comment about sunrise having been late that morning; a few days later she is surprised to see him up early in the day..WTF isn't he always up, oh yeah before the sun??? Secondly, apparently mortals are not allowed in the house, but they let Alice in AND they make no efforts to disguise themselves or use pseudonyms. Third, Aretemis can't afford her own apartment, but she can afford to pay Alice more than she was previously making (which is the sum total of what Alice has on which to exist on her own in her own apartment). Fourth, I have a note on page 68 when Hermes is first introduced as busy and as being the God of money as to why he has not lost his power...clearly I had already figured out the big kicker that their decline was due to a lack of followers...but Hermes should be stronger now than he was back in the good ole days; not weaker. Fifth, in the underworld it is explained that the concrete items are few and exist only because of the power of the souls that imagine them. BUT how does the newly dead manage to get on the train? They can't even pick up a baby because they lack substance so..how do they walk? get into the train? sit on the bench? Mindless drivel, not really any better than watching a poorly acted soap opera.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kasia

    The premise of this book is wild, but to my surprise I really enjoyed it. Modern day London occupied by Greek Gods, bored by the uneventful trickling of time and their powers decaying, is place for their mischief. Fed up, ill-tempered, occupied with lust and wicked games on their mind they find that mortals make great toys. Whether its turning them into objects or making them fall in love or hate one another is just another game in the daily lives of Apollo, Aphrodite, Eros, Zeus, Hera and the w The premise of this book is wild, but to my surprise I really enjoyed it. Modern day London occupied by Greek Gods, bored by the uneventful trickling of time and their powers decaying, is place for their mischief. Fed up, ill-tempered, occupied with lust and wicked games on their mind they find that mortals make great toys. Whether its turning them into objects or making them fall in love or hate one another is just another game in the daily lives of Apollo, Aphrodite, Eros, Zeus, Hera and the whole gang. Greek mythology comes to life, marred with many curse words that I found distasteful but it only added to their bad attitudes that were in a huge need of change. One day the game between Apollo and Aphrodite goes too far and two mortals, Alice and Nick get tangled up in their power play. Struck by a love arrow from Eros, Apollo falls madly in love with Alice and her male friends is not very happy about that. When powers that he has never dreamt of separate them the tale takes off and sweeps the readers of their feet. Nick must stand up to himself and to the Gods whose power is only too real. They kill without much though and love to play tricks, for him to save himself and the woman he loves he ventures out on a journey that is beyond anything his mortal life has prepared him for. This is a very fast read and I completed the task quite satisfied in one day, a work day never the less. The ending was fun and rewarding, I read it with a huge grin on my face and I wish the writer all the best with her career, she is on a good path. I loved the fast pace and comedic performances from the snooty Gods who got to learn a lesson or two from their own mess.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    Probably closer to 3.5 stars for this one. I really wish GR would get with it and let us do halves! This book was a recommendation on Goodreads, one of those "if you liked this book you'll also like....but of course I can't remember the original book. The premise of the book was interesting-gods living in modern London in the 1980's, in a ranky townhouse that is pretty much falling apart. Aphrodite is running a phone sex business, Artemis is a dog walker, Eros has discovered Christianity and is Probably closer to 3.5 stars for this one. I really wish GR would get with it and let us do halves! This book was a recommendation on Goodreads, one of those "if you liked this book you'll also like....but of course I can't remember the original book. The premise of the book was interesting-gods living in modern London in the 1980's, in a ranky townhouse that is pretty much falling apart. Aphrodite is running a phone sex business, Artemis is a dog walker, Eros has discovered Christianity and is volunteering with underprivileged children, and egotistical Apollo is, of course, a TV star with his own "psychic friends network." Enter mortals Alice and Neal, and the story gets even more interesting. Fairly entertaining, some really hilarious parts, but some other very predictable ones too. I enjoyed it as an audiobook because one of my favorite narrators, Rosalyn Landor, did most of the voices. Not sure it would have been as funny without the vocals, but if you're looking for something fairly light and a little different, check this out.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    A thoroughly adorable book, particularly if you're a Greek mythology geek like I am. Reminds one of a Shakespearean comedy or a pastoral romp, but with a slacker aesthetic thrown in. The principal characters, Alice, Artemis, Apollo, Neil, Hermes, Eros, Aphrodite, are all very nicely drawn and there are some genuine moments of pathos and poignancy mixed in with a great deal of screwball comedy and some genuinely substantial literary wit. I would have liked more Athena, Hera and the other gods in A thoroughly adorable book, particularly if you're a Greek mythology geek like I am. Reminds one of a Shakespearean comedy or a pastoral romp, but with a slacker aesthetic thrown in. The principal characters, Alice, Artemis, Apollo, Neil, Hermes, Eros, Aphrodite, are all very nicely drawn and there are some genuine moments of pathos and poignancy mixed in with a great deal of screwball comedy and some genuinely substantial literary wit. I would have liked more Athena, Hera and the other gods in general, but one can't have everything and the book made the wise decision to tie up in just under 300 pages (any more and it probably would have started to feel fairly tedious). Kudos also for doing the first and only personification of Styx that I have ever heard of- and that's really saying something.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rose Sinclair

    I was so excited for this book and thought the concept was brilliant. I'm only writing a review to express how wildly different the reality is. From the start it seems like the author has no love of the subject matter. Within the first 30 pages the god's antics make no logical or emotional sense and are played off for random 'Christianity is better' vibes. The 'sexy scenes' I encountered ranged from dried out purple prose to 'I have naughty bits look' style abuse. The plot is treated as if the g I was so excited for this book and thought the concept was brilliant. I'm only writing a review to express how wildly different the reality is. From the start it seems like the author has no love of the subject matter. Within the first 30 pages the god's antics make no logical or emotional sense and are played off for random 'Christianity is better' vibes. The 'sexy scenes' I encountered ranged from dried out purple prose to 'I have naughty bits look' style abuse. The plot is treated as if the gods were existing for thousands of years doing literally nothing only to randomly start retelling an old Greek story because the author decided they were finally bored so why not.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.