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Why have we humans always longed to connect with something larger than ourselves? Even today in our technologically advanced age, more than seventy percent of Americans claim to believe in God. Why, in short, won’t God go away? In this groundbreaking new book, researchers Andrew Newberg and Eugene d’Aquili offer an explanation that is at once profoundly simple and scientif Why have we humans always longed to connect with something larger than ourselves? Even today in our technologically advanced age, more than seventy percent of Americans claim to believe in God. Why, in short, won’t God go away? In this groundbreaking new book, researchers Andrew Newberg and Eugene d’Aquili offer an explanation that is at once profoundly simple and scientifically precise: The religious impulse is rooted in the biology of the brain. In Why God Won’t Go Away, Newberg and d’Aquili document their pioneering explorations in the field of neurotheology, an emerging discipline dedicated to understanding the complex relationship between spirituality and the brain. Blending cutting-edge science with illuminating insights into the nature of consciousness and spirituality, they bridge faith and reason, mysticism and empirical data. The neurological basis of how the brain identifies the “real” is nothing short of miraculous. This fascinating, eye-opening book dares to explore both the miracle and the biology of our enduring relationship with God.


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Why have we humans always longed to connect with something larger than ourselves? Even today in our technologically advanced age, more than seventy percent of Americans claim to believe in God. Why, in short, won’t God go away? In this groundbreaking new book, researchers Andrew Newberg and Eugene d’Aquili offer an explanation that is at once profoundly simple and scientif Why have we humans always longed to connect with something larger than ourselves? Even today in our technologically advanced age, more than seventy percent of Americans claim to believe in God. Why, in short, won’t God go away? In this groundbreaking new book, researchers Andrew Newberg and Eugene d’Aquili offer an explanation that is at once profoundly simple and scientifically precise: The religious impulse is rooted in the biology of the brain. In Why God Won’t Go Away, Newberg and d’Aquili document their pioneering explorations in the field of neurotheology, an emerging discipline dedicated to understanding the complex relationship between spirituality and the brain. Blending cutting-edge science with illuminating insights into the nature of consciousness and spirituality, they bridge faith and reason, mysticism and empirical data. The neurological basis of how the brain identifies the “real” is nothing short of miraculous. This fascinating, eye-opening book dares to explore both the miracle and the biology of our enduring relationship with God.

30 review for Why God Won't Go Away: Brain Science and the Biology of Belief

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessaka

    This book is vast, but all I am adding is quotes because a friend had asked me for them, and it took a long time to type them out. "Dr. Andrew Newberg is a neuroscientist who studies the relationship between brain function and various mental states. He is a pioneer in the neurological study of religious and spiritual experiences, a field known as “neurotheology.” His research includes taking brain scans of people in prayer, meditation, rituals, and trance states, in an attempt to better understa This book is vast, but all I am adding is quotes because a friend had asked me for them, and it took a long time to type them out. "Dr. Andrew Newberg is a neuroscientist who studies the relationship between brain function and various mental states. He is a pioneer in the neurological study of religious and spiritual experiences, a field known as “neurotheology.” His research includes taking brain scans of people in prayer, meditation, rituals, and trance states, in an attempt to better understand the nature of religious and spiritual practices and attitudes... While some authors compare religious hallucinations caused by schizophrenia, and while there are similarities between them, further study shows that these states are profoundly different in specific ways. Both states may be accompanied by religious visions, voices, and other unusual events. But mystics and psychotics respond to their experiences in dramatically different way. Mystics almost always describe their experiences as ecstatic and joyful, and the spiritual unity they claim to achieve is most often described using words such as “serenity,” “wholeness,” “transcendence,” and “love.” Psychotics, on the other hand, are often confused and terribly frightened by their religious hallucinations, which are often highly distressing in nature and often include the presence of an angry, reproachful God. Psychotic states can last for years, and they inevitably drive their victims into progressively deeper states of social isolation. Mystics, on the other hand, are often among the most respected members of some societies. Mystics and psychotics tend to have very different interpretations of the meaning of their experiences. Psychotics have feelings of grandiosity, for example, as emissaries from God… Mystical experiences are also set apart, from all hallucinatory states, by the high degree of sensory complexity they usually involve. Hallucinations usually involve a single sensory system-a person may see a vision, hear a disembodied voice, or feel a sense of presence, but rarely are multiple senses simultaneous involved. Mystical experiences, on the other hand, tend to be rich, coherent, and deeply dimensioned sensory experiences…In the plainest terms, they simply feel very real. Hallucinations, of course, also feel real while they persist, but when hallucinating individuals return to normal consciousness, they immediately recognize the fragmented and dreamlike nature of their hallucinatory interlude, and understand that is was all a mistake of the mind. Mystics, however, can never be persuaded that their experiences were not real. This sense of realness does not fade as they emerge from their mystical states, and it does not dissipate over time. God visits the soul in a way that prevents it doubting when it comes to itself that it has been in God and God in it,” says Teresa of Avila, “ so firmly is it convince of this truth that, though years may pass before this state recurs, the soul can never forget it, to doubt its reality.”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Broodingferret

    This book was well researched and, for the most part, well argued. In many of my other readings on the subject, I'd come across references to the fMRI work that Newberg and D'Aquili had done with Tibetan monks and Franciscan nuns, so I expected this books to take a largely scientific approach to the topic of religious and spiritual behavior and was not disappointed. On the plus side Newberg and D'Aquili postulate plausible pathways by which the brain generates various spiritual experiences, and This book was well researched and, for the most part, well argued. In many of my other readings on the subject, I'd come across references to the fMRI work that Newberg and D'Aquili had done with Tibetan monks and Franciscan nuns, so I expected this books to take a largely scientific approach to the topic of religious and spiritual behavior and was not disappointed. On the plus side Newberg and D'Aquili postulate plausible pathways by which the brain generates various spiritual experiences, and their discussions about various brain areas and cognitive functions are communicated in generalized, yet clear ways, providing information that is simplified without being dumbed-down. Their closing chapters, however, leave a bit to be desired, as they take their rationally collected data and process it in patently irrational ways to draw the conclusion that a higher spiritual plane is likely to exist. They did so well in adhering to scientific rigor through the first three-quarters of the book that the apples-to-oranges comparisons and the blatant logical fallacies of the last quarter were a sore disappointment. Still, the book was well written and it does contain some fascinating data on brain function as it relates to spiritual experiences, and for that I would recommend it to anyone interested in the field.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kayson Fakhar

    if its a nonfiction book where are the references? if its not why there is academic names in it?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sehar Moughal

    Last night, I lay on the grass. Above me an open clear sky sprinkled with stars. Around me water, gently moving. Dimly lit houses in the far distant. Silence as silent nature can be.I was nothing. I was everything. Orgasmic. Moving me to tears. I have had many experiences like that - the first one when I was 8 years old. Newberg tries to explain these mystical experiences using neurobiology and evolution. This is the first time I have witnessed science in bed with spirituality. What a union! I t Last night, I lay on the grass. Above me an open clear sky sprinkled with stars. Around me water, gently moving. Dimly lit houses in the far distant. Silence as silent nature can be.I was nothing. I was everything. Orgasmic. Moving me to tears. I have had many experiences like that - the first one when I was 8 years old. Newberg tries to explain these mystical experiences using neurobiology and evolution. This is the first time I have witnessed science in bed with spirituality. What a union! I think everyone should read this book. Although you may struggle if: + you are religious but not spiritual or + you are cynical when it comes to spirituality + or science + or proud of being a rational being Reading this book has been a mystical experience. Go figure!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joey

    The science in this book is well cited throughout, but I wish there was more data regarding "spiritual" or "transcendent" experiences. "The goal of every living brain, no matter what its level of neurological sophistication, from the tiny knots of nerve cells that govern insect behavior on up to the intricate complexity of the human neocortex, has been to enhance the organism's chances of survival by reacting to raw sensory data and translating it to a negotiable rendition of a world." (15) Visual The science in this book is well cited throughout, but I wish there was more data regarding "spiritual" or "transcendent" experiences. "The goal of every living brain, no matter what its level of neurological sophistication, from the tiny knots of nerve cells that govern insect behavior on up to the intricate complexity of the human neocortex, has been to enhance the organism's chances of survival by reacting to raw sensory data and translating it to a negotiable rendition of a world." (15) Visual, orientation, attention, and verbal conception associations that occur in the brain help create personal meaning especially when linked with mythos and ritual.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nasim

    I didn't finish this book. I don't think it was as intriguing as I expected. I am personally an atheist with interests in the sciences, but I am interested in how religion affects people including why they believe even after we have learned so much of the science behind evolution and the universe, etc. I expected to be drawn in much more strongly than I was. I didn't finish this book. I don't think it was as intriguing as I expected. I am personally an atheist with interests in the sciences, but I am interested in how religion affects people including why they believe even after we have learned so much of the science behind evolution and the universe, etc. I expected to be drawn in much more strongly than I was.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lee Harmon

    A single quote from this book probably explains all we need to know about why God won’t go away: So impressive are the health benefits of religion … that after reviewing more than a thousand studies on the impact of religion upon health, Dr. Harold Koenig of Duke University Medical Center recently told The New Republic, that “Lack of religious involvement has an effect on mortality that is equivalent to forty years of smoking one pack of cigarettes per day. What more evidence do we need that evolu A single quote from this book probably explains all we need to know about why God won’t go away: So impressive are the health benefits of religion … that after reviewing more than a thousand studies on the impact of religion upon health, Dr. Harold Koenig of Duke University Medical Center recently told The New Republic, that “Lack of religious involvement has an effect on mortality that is equivalent to forty years of smoking one pack of cigarettes per day. What more evidence do we need that evolution has wired us for religion? The subtitle is Brain Science & The Biology of Belief, and the back cover copy promises, “This fascinating, eye-opening book dares to explore both the miracle and the biology of our enduring relationship with God.” The book begins with a short overview of the brain; in particular, the orientation association area that defines the “self.” The authors believe this area is extremely important in the brain’s sense of mystical and religious experiences. Religion is far from new. The graves and shrines of the Neanderthals are the earliest known evidence of religious behavior. As soon as hominids began to behave like human beings, they began to wonder and worry about the deepest mysteries of existence—and found resolutions for those mysteries in the stories we call myths. This observation is central to the authors’ quest for understanding our religious need. Why would the human mind compel us, in every culture and throughout time, to seek answers to our most troubling problems in myth? The book next discusses ritual, mysticism, and the mind’s search for absolutes … for the “realer than real.” Our minds are drawn by the intuition of a deeper reality, an utter sense of oneness with the Absolute. God, say the authors, will not go away, so long as we are capable of sensing something more.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Liz Miller

    I just finished this book for my Sociology of Religion course (and now I just have to write the 10 page review of it...). Overall, I liked it. I found that Newberg was quite redundant though, saying the same think a couple times in a matter of pages. Using repetition in one's writing is a rhetorical device, but it can be overused, and I say that Newberg overused that device. Beyond that, I would say that it was overall quite interesting and better than many other scientific books that I have rea I just finished this book for my Sociology of Religion course (and now I just have to write the 10 page review of it...). Overall, I liked it. I found that Newberg was quite redundant though, saying the same think a couple times in a matter of pages. Using repetition in one's writing is a rhetorical device, but it can be overused, and I say that Newberg overused that device. Beyond that, I would say that it was overall quite interesting and better than many other scientific books that I have read. I have been very interested in consciousness for years now, and this book involves a particular (emerging) field within the study of consciousness: neurotheology. I recommend this book!

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Martindale

    I liked the author's summary of myth making and speculations on how it might have developed in some cases. An example was of someone in the distant past who heard something rustling in the leaves, his brain faces the dilemma “It is a leopard or it is not a leopard”. The safest course is to decide it is a leopard and to flee, things then move from the anxiety of not knowing, to a concrete fear of a specific threat that can lead to a specific response. The certainty perhaps might have saved the li I liked the author's summary of myth making and speculations on how it might have developed in some cases. An example was of someone in the distant past who heard something rustling in the leaves, his brain faces the dilemma “It is a leopard or it is not a leopard”. The safest course is to decide it is a leopard and to flee, things then move from the anxiety of not knowing, to a concrete fear of a specific threat that can lead to a specific response. The certainty perhaps might have saved the life of our ancient ancestor. In the mist of the anxious uncertainty, the “myth” of the leopard was created and it possibly had survival value. Building of this, existential anxiety concerning ones death and what was to happen in the hereafter, could result in a state of anxiety. Possibly a chieftain of some tribe may have possibly seen the smoke rising up to the heavens as the fire died, and by way of analogy considered the soul a dead friend to have done the same. Upon seeing this connection, there is a moment of eureka; a sense of excitement as if one just discovered a deep truth. This sensation plus the fact that it eased and soothed the existential dread would give a sense of its truth and the belief would be beneficial to him. He shares it with others, though they don't feel the same flash of insight he had, something about what he said seems to make sense to them and helps to explain things. I appreciate that Newberg has come to similar conclusions as I have, that brain imaging which reveals the neurological processes the occur during a religious experience, and the naturalistic explanations of why these things arose, says nothing concerning whether or not there an ultimate reality. Also though religious experiences can be stimulated and manufactured through drugs, this doesn't' disprove the possibility of actual supernatural stimulus, if there is a God who can and does communicate, the brain would light up in certain areas, just like when a friend talks to us, our brain lights up in numerous ares.. Some drug could likely activate the parts of the brain that give us the feeling of being in love, but this doesn't in turn render meaningless a couple actually being in love, also the artificial stimulated sensation will in some way differ to the real thing. From what I've heard, the artificially induced religious experiences differ in magnitude, lasting impact and significance with organic ones. When people have a vision, the same parts of the brain involved in a hallucination may be activated, and yet the content is often much more specific and clear and less dream like than the run-of-the-mill hallucination. It is interesting considering how the rapture we feel in music for example, could be said to all be in the brain, and we can give some naturalistic just-so story for why it had survival value and was maintained by natural selection, and yet to claim it is “nothing but” and act as if there is no music wouldn't fly. His reflections towards the end of the book were interesting. While dreaming things may seem real, but upon waking in comparison to the waken life it is clearly less real. What is fascinating is the mystical experience, it is the reverse, upon returning to the normal material world, it seems less real compared to what they experienced. So on the same criteria that people feel justified in considering the lived physical world more real than the dream world, the mystics, those who had an awareness in which self melted away with the oneness of being, are justified to conclude this is the greater reality. An awareness without any sense of self has always sounded absurd to me. And yet it is helpful hearing about the part of the brain that gives us our sense of self, and considering the infant who clearly has awareness, but has yet to fully develop that sense of self. But yeah, the denial of the self in the Eastern tradition has always sounded so absurd and contradictory, for if it is based upon experience, there had to be a self to experience it and recall it and try and put it into words. But maybe it is more the sense of awareness instead of being contained in the individual self as in normal experience, suddenly feels one with the universal “self” due to the part of the brain were self-hood is maintained being suppressed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scott Hayden

    Fascinating biology. Predictable evolutionary thought; neo-Freudian in an odd sort of way - religion boils down to ancient sexual impulses that developed into something beyond ourselves. (Of course, everything in biological evolution must harken to survival or reproduction.) At least the author was honest. I was "mocking" him in the margins through many parts of the book refering to him and his as "the priesthood". Later he admitted that his own scientific explanations were indeed a kind of "myth Fascinating biology. Predictable evolutionary thought; neo-Freudian in an odd sort of way - religion boils down to ancient sexual impulses that developed into something beyond ourselves. (Of course, everything in biological evolution must harken to survival or reproduction.) At least the author was honest. I was "mocking" him in the margins through many parts of the book refering to him and his as "the priesthood". Later he admitted that his own scientific explanations were indeed a kind of "myth making." Ironically, although for decades atheists have been accusing Christians of checking their brains in at the door, Newberg suggests that that's exactly what we ought to be doing in order to achieve the highest states of consciousness and therefore, of religion. According to his evaluation, religious practitioners who most successfully "turn off their brains" are the model that the rest of us should follow. Am I the only one disturbed by this anti-intellectuallism? Basically, this book asks the chicken-and-egg question about God, but leaves us with no definitive answer.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Pretty good book. Makes a nice case of reconciling God and science. Wish I had read this 10 years ago. Much of the early chapters had matter I already knew or was familiar with since I have neuroscience training, except their terminology for brain areas was nonconventional. The book really picks up from page 98 and on.

  12. 5 out of 5

    ♥ Ibrahim ♥

    He pushes the arguments; he has the hypothesis in his mind as he likes it and then uses experiences of all kinds of people as if they substantiate a scientific fact.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Pat

    Goes over the history of myth and ritual. The author investigated how meditation and prayer performed by Buddist monks and Catholic nuns led to low stress hormones in the brain.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marius

    The neurology of mystical experience. The study on Buddhist monks and Franc. nuns showed the brain neural mechanism that dissolve the sense of self and gives a mystical experience (feelings of awe, unity, higher reality). The question that keeped popping into my mind, and to my satisfaction the author also posed was "Is this spiritual experience simply a brain state ?" . I found useful the dream analogy. The condition for something less real to exist is by containing it by something more real. A The neurology of mystical experience. The study on Buddhist monks and Franc. nuns showed the brain neural mechanism that dissolve the sense of self and gives a mystical experience (feelings of awe, unity, higher reality). The question that keeped popping into my mind, and to my satisfaction the author also posed was "Is this spiritual experience simply a brain state ?" . I found useful the dream analogy. The condition for something less real to exist is by containing it by something more real. A dream feels real, but, after we wake up and keep integrating and comparing the dream to the present reality, the dream seems less real but it is to some degree real nevertheless. And by the some logic goes the spiritual experiences. If a higher reality still exists, that transcends the material reality is still questionable. Altough we do have the brain structures for mystical experiences, it is possible to be a brain response to the frighthening fact that we are aware of our own death and the ability to transcend the material reality is an evolutionary biological response. Is this book enough to make up my mind on these big questions? No. I may need to re-read this, powerful stuff !! Personally, if we are capable to feel a higher reality or is a evolutionary brain mechanism, it's still highly important for the general human, spirituality being a neccesity that we shall pay greater attention and care just as other needs !

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susan Marrier

    Newberg's research and thought make a good case for the existence of what he calls Absolute Unitary Being. When he delves into the history of religion, he enters the realm of speculation, but otherwise the neuroscience is carefully done. I began to think of other areas where things that cannot be measured and explained scientifically are accepted as nonetheless real. Music, for example, cannot be explained simply as quantifiable vibrations. And so neither can the mystical experience of union wit Newberg's research and thought make a good case for the existence of what he calls Absolute Unitary Being. When he delves into the history of religion, he enters the realm of speculation, but otherwise the neuroscience is carefully done. I began to think of other areas where things that cannot be measured and explained scientifically are accepted as nonetheless real. Music, for example, cannot be explained simply as quantifiable vibrations. And so neither can the mystical experience of union with God, however named, and all of creation. Science is based on the hypothesis that everything that is "real" can be quantified and experienced by the senses, but even that reality is filtered through our brains and may or may not be as perceived. This is a very readable treatment of the subject, and continues the path of reconciliation between science and religion, which began on separate trajectories in the 18th century, but are gradually coming to be seen as two different but perhaps quite compatible ways of seeing the world.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    If you believe in your gut that faith and reason are not opposed, that there's something that will someday unite science and spirituality, you need to read this book. It's certainly not any kind of final answer. But using neurological data from experiments with meditative practitioners of both Eastern and Western traditions, the authors show how the human brain itself may be the source of the spiritual impetus that is at the core of religion. It is simultaneously respectful of the "mythological" If you believe in your gut that faith and reason are not opposed, that there's something that will someday unite science and spirituality, you need to read this book. It's certainly not any kind of final answer. But using neurological data from experiments with meditative practitioners of both Eastern and Western traditions, the authors show how the human brain itself may be the source of the spiritual impetus that is at the core of religion. It is simultaneously respectful of the "mythological" aspects of religion while recognizing the spiritual core of religion that is all too often ignored by modern critics of religion. The book hypothesizes that the spiritual impulse may indeed be more than simply an evolutionary left-over like neurological version of the appendix, but that the brain's perception of a greater oneness may indeed be the perception of a reality that is greater than the reality that we touch and feel everyday. If nothing else, this book gives food for thought that we should all take a bite or two of.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rohith Ajjampur

    Although the book starts with a detailed explanation of what we currently know about brain functions and its areas of interest for studying such functions, it continuously takes a position of not fully believing what it is trying to figure out, i.e., if there is something that the current brain science doesn't know about its subject. Towards the end though, the authors come to a conclusion reluctantly, for the lack of a better explanation, that there is something that goes beyond the biological Although the book starts with a detailed explanation of what we currently know about brain functions and its areas of interest for studying such functions, it continuously takes a position of not fully believing what it is trying to figure out, i.e., if there is something that the current brain science doesn't know about its subject. Towards the end though, the authors come to a conclusion reluctantly, for the lack of a better explanation, that there is something that goes beyond the biological and material stuff we call brain. These and other such deeper questions have been dealt with in detail in eastern philosophical thought more than a few millennia ago, which the science is trying to explain with great difficulty only recently.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    “Can all spirituality and any experience of the reality of God be reduced to a fleeting rush of electrochemical blips and flashes, racing along the neural pathways of the brain? The simplest answer is yes. Are we saying, then, that God is just an idea, with no more absolute substance than a fantasy or a dream? The simplest answer is no.” (p. 143) Much of the neuroscience and theology of the book went over my head, but it is still an interesting read. Newberg presents the information in an unbiase “Can all spirituality and any experience of the reality of God be reduced to a fleeting rush of electrochemical blips and flashes, racing along the neural pathways of the brain? The simplest answer is yes. Are we saying, then, that God is just an idea, with no more absolute substance than a fantasy or a dream? The simplest answer is no.” (p. 143) Much of the neuroscience and theology of the book went over my head, but it is still an interesting read. Newberg presents the information in an unbiased way and leaves it up to the reader to form opinions. He describes spiritual experiences from a variety of world religions and encourages the perspective that all religions are created equally.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Phil Calderone

    I’m shocked. This book was great up to the last two chapters, 5-star. Based on everything they have found and said so far there is no basis to think that this Unity feeling is anything more than a brain state. It can feel or be perceived as something more but that in no way is evidence that it is more. All the “it exists” wording in the last two chapters is bunk—unjustified assertion. I found this in Newberg’s other books too, typically lowering him to 3-star reviews. And now it has dragged this I’m shocked. This book was great up to the last two chapters, 5-star. Based on everything they have found and said so far there is no basis to think that this Unity feeling is anything more than a brain state. It can feel or be perceived as something more but that in no way is evidence that it is more. All the “it exists” wording in the last two chapters is bunk—unjustified assertion. I found this in Newberg’s other books too, typically lowering him to 3-star reviews. And now it has dragged this book down too. Read the first seven chapters then tear out and throw away the balance.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Camila

    Boy was this a book that required a lot of attention! it took me forever to read because I felt I had to digest all the information being thrown at me. It was a lot different from what I imagined but nonetheless captivating with this new concept I was completely unaware of, Neurotheology. Would I read more on the topic? probably not. Was it good to know about this? yeah, absolutely even if it was just to comprehend the advances of neuroscience.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ken Mattes

    This listen/read presents concepts around “neuro-theology” or the science of brain function and the biology of beliefs. Excellent introduction to brain structure and function and the application of brain imaging studies on meditative states of Tibetan Monks and Mystics. Interpretation of these states on the “reality” of our physical world and perception of this physical worlds. Definitely worth the read and discussion of our minds perception of the “world” we exist in.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna Engel

    [3.5 stars] This was a fascinating in-depth examination of where God comes from and how the human brain conceives of God and religious feeling. A lot of the neurological and philosophical discussions were beyond me, but there were still enough explanations in layman's terms to make it interesting and accessible. [3.5 stars] This was a fascinating in-depth examination of where God comes from and how the human brain conceives of God and religious feeling. A lot of the neurological and philosophical discussions were beyond me, but there were still enough explanations in layman's terms to make it interesting and accessible.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

    An accessible and worthwhile exploration, grounded in neurobiology and philosophy, and leaving most, if not all, of the essential questions open. Snarky copyeditor’s review: I’d like to take another crack at comma use throughout this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Verena Hagenbusch

    It‘s very interesting for somebody, who needs a scientific explanation for the belief for religion. But even though the brain science is well explained it‘s not easy to understand on the first thought.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Wow! talk about deep! This book truly goes into the very deepest search for how our brains function. It is NOT an easy read and those who truly want to understand how God has made this magnificent part of us need to persevere! It is amazing information but not for the lazy!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alok Sharma

    Everyone must read, it is about a game we all have our stack in, It should change the course of current debates between theist and atheists. All scripture and heaven must fall, we will be the scripture our body will be the heaven. Said it once will say it again and again - "Aham brhamasmi". Everyone must read, it is about a game we all have our stack in, It should change the course of current debates between theist and atheists. All scripture and heaven must fall, we will be the scripture our body will be the heaven. Said it once will say it again and again - "Aham brhamasmi".

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Neuschwander

    Argues that transcendence or spirituality is biologically universal, and neurologically speaking, "real." Argues that transcendence or spirituality is biologically universal, and neurologically speaking, "real."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Gives you something to think about. I'm sure I'll never reach the Ultimate. Gives you something to think about. I'm sure I'll never reach the Ultimate.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cherith Keeton

    Heavy on biology. No need to read this book again.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mark Koester

    I don’t agree with final answers this book gives on godhead and origin of religion but the brain sciences and origins of mystical experiences made this a thought-provoking read.

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