counter create hit Coaching Women In The Martial Arts - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Coaching Women In The Martial Arts

Availability: Ready to download

More and more women are participating in the martial arts, for reasons ranging from self-defense to physical fitness. Yet a large number of women who begin training become intimidated by the physical demands of the sport and quickly drop out, despite that almost anyone can acquire the strength, flexibility, and endurance necessary for this ancient art. Often this is becaus More and more women are participating in the martial arts, for reasons ranging from self-defense to physical fitness. Yet a large number of women who begin training become intimidated by the physical demands of the sport and quickly drop out, despite that almost anyone can acquire the strength, flexibility, and endurance necessary for this ancient art. Often this is because instructors are not sensitive to the particular needs of female athletes.Coaching Women in the Martial Arts reveals to instructors the concerns of female martial artists and how to help them get the most out of their training. Illustrated with more than 50 photos, its chapters tackle topics such as why women participate in the martial arts, attitudes they encounter in the training hall, how instructors can build a winning spirit in their female students, and becoming a female-friendly martial arts school. It also addresses women's special needs concerning self-defense, sparring, mastering techniques designed for men, injury prevention, and pregnancy.


Compare
Ads Banner

More and more women are participating in the martial arts, for reasons ranging from self-defense to physical fitness. Yet a large number of women who begin training become intimidated by the physical demands of the sport and quickly drop out, despite that almost anyone can acquire the strength, flexibility, and endurance necessary for this ancient art. Often this is becaus More and more women are participating in the martial arts, for reasons ranging from self-defense to physical fitness. Yet a large number of women who begin training become intimidated by the physical demands of the sport and quickly drop out, despite that almost anyone can acquire the strength, flexibility, and endurance necessary for this ancient art. Often this is because instructors are not sensitive to the particular needs of female athletes.Coaching Women in the Martial Arts reveals to instructors the concerns of female martial artists and how to help them get the most out of their training. Illustrated with more than 50 photos, its chapters tackle topics such as why women participate in the martial arts, attitudes they encounter in the training hall, how instructors can build a winning spirit in their female students, and becoming a female-friendly martial arts school. It also addresses women's special needs concerning self-defense, sparring, mastering techniques designed for men, injury prevention, and pregnancy.

5 review for Coaching Women In The Martial Arts

  1. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I think this is not a bad book for a male martial arts instructor to at least skim. While there are a lot of bits that I think will be obvious to any man who has had any contact with women ever (ie, women on average are smaller than men & have less muscle mass), there are some other things that might not have occurred to them necessarily. Like that women are more likely to be interested in martial arts for fitness or self-defense reasons than men are, that women tend to be more flexible & agile I think this is not a bad book for a male martial arts instructor to at least skim. While there are a lot of bits that I think will be obvious to any man who has had any contact with women ever (ie, women on average are smaller than men & have less muscle mass), there are some other things that might not have occurred to them necessarily. Like that women are more likely to be interested in martial arts for fitness or self-defense reasons than men are, that women tend to be more flexible & agile than men, which can give them advantages in certain situations, or that women are less likely to have roughhoused with others or played contact sports as children / adolescents & might be more intimidated or hesitant about partner drills or sparring than a lot of men. However, it's unfortunate that a lot of this important and worthwhile information is phrased in such an over-generalized way. Lawler does mention a couple of times that not ALL of this information applies to ALL women, but still, most of it comes across in a way that feels like, "In general, you can expect women to be like x in the martial arts and have y issues that are different than men." Lots of statements begin with "Most women..." or "Many women..." which again I think could cause male instructors who don't know any better to end up painting all their female students with the same brush rather than just using this information as a resource as they try to get to know and understand a female student as an individual, the same way they would a male student. (With so many of these types of statements, I found myself going, "Huh, I've never known ANY female martial artists like that.") So yeah. I think it's reasonably good information, but if you are a male martial instructor who really has not worked with women before at all (or always been uncomfortable doing so), I think I would first seek out a female colleague (maybe more than one) to bounce the ideas in this book off of & get a more nuanced understanding of how they are actually likely to play out (or not).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jake

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mads

  5. 4 out of 5

    Angela

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.