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The Dragon and the Elephant: China, India and the New World Order

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The rise of China and India will be the outstanding development of the 21st century, raising fundamental questions about both the structure of the world economy and the balance of global geopolitical power. Will China still be a repressive and undemocratic regime, embracing free market economics but only when it suits? How aggressive a superpower will it be? And what about The rise of China and India will be the outstanding development of the 21st century, raising fundamental questions about both the structure of the world economy and the balance of global geopolitical power. Will China still be a repressive and undemocratic regime, embracing free market economics but only when it suits? How aggressive a superpower will it be? And what about India, whose huge and growing population and economic prospects appear to guarantee prosperity? David Smith analyses the ways in which the world is tilting rapidly Eastwards, and examines all the implications of the shift in global power to Beijing, Delhi and Washington - a shift that will creep up on us before we know it.


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The rise of China and India will be the outstanding development of the 21st century, raising fundamental questions about both the structure of the world economy and the balance of global geopolitical power. Will China still be a repressive and undemocratic regime, embracing free market economics but only when it suits? How aggressive a superpower will it be? And what about The rise of China and India will be the outstanding development of the 21st century, raising fundamental questions about both the structure of the world economy and the balance of global geopolitical power. Will China still be a repressive and undemocratic regime, embracing free market economics but only when it suits? How aggressive a superpower will it be? And what about India, whose huge and growing population and economic prospects appear to guarantee prosperity? David Smith analyses the ways in which the world is tilting rapidly Eastwards, and examines all the implications of the shift in global power to Beijing, Delhi and Washington - a shift that will creep up on us before we know it.

30 review for The Dragon and the Elephant: China, India and the New World Order

  1. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    The subject itself is one that interests me and I really like the authors other books and articles in The Times but I ust couldn't get into this week. It was so difficult to read and I found the topics raised came across as being quite dry.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James

    A thorough primer into the rising economies of both China and India. It's quite dense and dry, and doesn't provide any very definitive conclusions other than the final paragraph. But that has everything to do with the complexity of the topic. With so many moving parts, making future predictions is tough. So instead this book serves as a way to get a clear picture and good grasp on both companies. It has a reasonably comprehensive history for both countries and strives to fairly look at their adva A thorough primer into the rising economies of both China and India. It's quite dense and dry, and doesn't provide any very definitive conclusions other than the final paragraph. But that has everything to do with the complexity of the topic. With so many moving parts, making future predictions is tough. So instead this book serves as a way to get a clear picture and good grasp on both companies. It has a reasonably comprehensive history for both countries and strives to fairly look at their advantages as well as disadvantages. In addition, the book refers to a look of other works, so this is a good place to start if you want to take your research further. If you prefer to keep your feelings about India, China and global economics simple (and incorrect), avoid reading this. But for those seeking a bit of enlightenment, this book is well worth the time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Glitter

    A clear, concise explanation of the two superpowers in the world right now. Brilliant use of statistics and other sources. A worthwhile read if what's happening with the world economics right now interests you.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul Whitla

    A sketchy book that contains some good parts but overall is a little too general for most readers who will already have some familiarity with the subject. The book comes in seven main sections: The introduction and opening chapter frame the book and the author goes back to suggest that at one time India and China were amongst the worlds major trading nations; what is happening now is only a return to that position. All a bit breathless and nothing really very new. The second and third chapters loo A sketchy book that contains some good parts but overall is a little too general for most readers who will already have some familiarity with the subject. The book comes in seven main sections: The introduction and opening chapter frame the book and the author goes back to suggest that at one time India and China were amongst the worlds major trading nations; what is happening now is only a return to that position. All a bit breathless and nothing really very new. The second and third chapters look at the recent history of both countries and the routes they took post-independence in the case of India and post-revolution in the case of China. Again these chapters are rather too general for anybody who already has an interest in the topic who will know most of the stuff being presented here. The fourth and fifth chapters look at what is happening now and these chapters, being very current are a little bit better. They both look at the progress that is being made and the challenges that each country faces. The chapter on India is particularly good making the point that a tiny proportion of the population is working in the services export industries and this is unlikely to grow substantially. There is a good part on the demographic issues facing both countries which is quite different in nature. A comparison between the two countries, explaining their different growth rates and examining future prospects is then made. There are some interesting points here including how India sees itself as the tortoise compared to China’s hare. The suggestion is made that although China has the physical infrastructure necessary for business, India has the soft infrastructure of rule of law, property rights etc which may be more important in the long term. The point is made that India’s leading multinationals are Indian firms led by Indians, whereas much of China’s growth has been based on incoming FDI.. The last section looks at ten ways in which China and India will or will not change the world. Again a bit breathless in tone and all based on very little evidence. But some good points. Overall a satisfactory book, good as an introduction and maybe even as a supplement for an undergraduate course. Will likely date very quickly though.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Doquesa

    A good introductory work to compare the Chinese and to a lesser extent, Indian economic success

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nora

    This book perfectly describes the economic, demographic and political differences between the largest two emerging market economies.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Vadassery Rakesh

    I think this is the most realistic of comparisons between a successful economy and a dragging wannabe. But the author is prudent enough to see the things with a longer perspective, wherein he rightly predicts India, the proverbial laggard tortoise to snatch the laurels from the disciplined, swift and agile Dragon. He rightly identifies the bomb on which China is resting it's ass - the suppressed population of 1.4 Billion. Matter of time that a Soviet Union repeats in the Kungfu land with more gr I think this is the most realistic of comparisons between a successful economy and a dragging wannabe. But the author is prudent enough to see the things with a longer perspective, wherein he rightly predicts India, the proverbial laggard tortoise to snatch the laurels from the disciplined, swift and agile Dragon. He rightly identifies the bomb on which China is resting it's ass - the suppressed population of 1.4 Billion. Matter of time that a Soviet Union repeats in the Kungfu land with more grandness. India's private sector has been lauded in the book, yes India holds the edge over China not only in its mammoth reservoir of Software pros, but the razor sharp business brains of the Marwadi as well. But alas! everything was written last decade, poor Mr Smith did not know then a silent man will spoil the broth for India.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Trudy

    This book gives great insight into the two countries emerging as the next world powers. Personal stories are intertwined with history and cultural facts. It makes globalization real and very understandable, and maybe not quite so frightening. I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Aniruddha

    Some more of the same stuff, some interesting insight in parts. A fast read, and well written.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    .

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dhakshi

    The book is structured well, each chapter contains a section for India and China allowing the reader to make direct comparisons for themselves. Good basic introduction on the rise of India and China.

  12. 5 out of 5

    د. يوسف Yousif شمس الدين Shamsaldeen

    An excellent and simplified book for those interested in the global economy, politics and history. A lot of the prospects mentioned in this book becomes real as I can see.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Raghuveer

    must read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Filothea

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gaurav

  16. 5 out of 5

    Donny Bourke

  17. 4 out of 5

    Varun

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aimee Christian

  19. 5 out of 5

    R4jesh

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kartik Tripathi

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pankaj Dhanrajani

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gabriele

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Ratkovic

  24. 5 out of 5

    Luca

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jay Maniyar

  26. 4 out of 5

    Henriette

  27. 5 out of 5

    Survi Agarwal

  28. 5 out of 5

    Abhijit

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ds_Sourav

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sam

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