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Cocaine, Death Squads, and the War on Terror: U.S. Imperialism and Class Struggle in Colombia

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Since the late 1990s, the United States has funneled billions of dollars in aid to Colombia, ostensibly to combat the illicit drug trade and State Department-designated terrorist groups. The result has been a spiral of violence that continues to take lives and destabilize Colombian society. This book asks an obvious question: are the official reasons given for the wars on Since the late 1990s, the United States has funneled billions of dollars in aid to Colombia, ostensibly to combat the illicit drug trade and State Department-designated terrorist groups. The result has been a spiral of violence that continues to take lives and destabilize Colombian society. This book asks an obvious question: are the official reasons given for the wars on drugs and terror in Colombia plausible, or are there other, deeper factors at work? Scholars Villar and Cottle suggest that the answers lie in a close examination of the cocaine trade, particularly its class dimensions. Their analysis reveals that this trade has fueled extensive economic growth and led to the development of a "narco-state" under the control of a "narco-bourgeoisie" which is not interested in eradicating cocaine but in gaining a monopoly over its production. The principal target of this effort is the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), who challenge that monopoly as well as the very existence of the Colombian state. Meanwhile, U.S. business interests likewise gain from the cocaine trade and seek to maintain a dominant, imperialist relationship with their most important client state in Latin America. Suffering the brutal consequences, as always, are the peasants and workers of Colombia. This revelatory book punctures the official propaganda and shows the class war underpinning the politics of the Colombian cocaine trade.


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Since the late 1990s, the United States has funneled billions of dollars in aid to Colombia, ostensibly to combat the illicit drug trade and State Department-designated terrorist groups. The result has been a spiral of violence that continues to take lives and destabilize Colombian society. This book asks an obvious question: are the official reasons given for the wars on Since the late 1990s, the United States has funneled billions of dollars in aid to Colombia, ostensibly to combat the illicit drug trade and State Department-designated terrorist groups. The result has been a spiral of violence that continues to take lives and destabilize Colombian society. This book asks an obvious question: are the official reasons given for the wars on drugs and terror in Colombia plausible, or are there other, deeper factors at work? Scholars Villar and Cottle suggest that the answers lie in a close examination of the cocaine trade, particularly its class dimensions. Their analysis reveals that this trade has fueled extensive economic growth and led to the development of a "narco-state" under the control of a "narco-bourgeoisie" which is not interested in eradicating cocaine but in gaining a monopoly over its production. The principal target of this effort is the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), who challenge that monopoly as well as the very existence of the Colombian state. Meanwhile, U.S. business interests likewise gain from the cocaine trade and seek to maintain a dominant, imperialist relationship with their most important client state in Latin America. Suffering the brutal consequences, as always, are the peasants and workers of Colombia. This revelatory book punctures the official propaganda and shows the class war underpinning the politics of the Colombian cocaine trade.

48 review for Cocaine, Death Squads, and the War on Terror: U.S. Imperialism and Class Struggle in Colombia

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laurel Ferguson

    Drugs and Terrorism Who ever knows anything about the cocaine drug trade? A little bit of an update here for me. Looks like you could get a better deal on cocaine than you could on marijuana accept for the violence that comes with hard drugs. I thought marijuana was so terrible but this cocaine certainly has it beat. Big business that squishes the little guy. Nothing seems to be good for the poor, including any kind of big corporation, except I thought Hemp would be. Just one more drug which, of Drugs and Terrorism Who ever knows anything about the cocaine drug trade? A little bit of an update here for me. Looks like you could get a better deal on cocaine than you could on marijuana accept for the violence that comes with hard drugs. I thought marijuana was so terrible but this cocaine certainly has it beat. Big business that squishes the little guy. Nothing seems to be good for the poor, including any kind of big corporation, except I thought Hemp would be. Just one more drug which, of course has to be eradicated along with all the rest that are all addictive and cause death.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cheebaism

    Excellent book, one of the best pieces I've read on us foreign policy and the drug trade. A classic of the genre up there with Peter Dale Scott and Alfred McCoy's works.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matt

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    Scarlett Mansfield

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    Richard

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    John Koster

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    Darren

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    Eduardo

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nate Joseph

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mo Rodriguez

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    Perry

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    Jesse Taylor

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    Tom Blackburn

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    Patrick Vardy

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    C.S.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Louise

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    Eva

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    Adriana Ramírez

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    Thomas Harvell-DeGolier

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

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    Dillon

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    Will

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    Rodney Ulyate

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    Maxy.kai

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    Stephanie

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    John L

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    Brian

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    Matthew Jankowski

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    Oralmajority

  38. 5 out of 5

    Derek

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    Michael

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    Monica

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    Heather Lewis

  42. 5 out of 5

    Aloha

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    Carmen

  44. 5 out of 5

    Royall

  45. 5 out of 5

    Dan Sharber

  46. 4 out of 5

    Dina

  47. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  48. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Chow

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