counter create hit Dying to Get Published - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Dying to Get Published

Availability: Ready to download

Judy Fitzwater's comic mystery tour de force, originally published by Ballantine Books, is finally available in electronic format. Jennifer Marsh is a mystery writer with a stack of eight unpublished manuscripts and rejection letters to match filling her closet. She's sure that if she can just get famous for something, someone will have to publish her books. Why not murder? Judy Fitzwater's comic mystery tour de force, originally published by Ballantine Books, is finally available in electronic format. Jennifer Marsh is a mystery writer with a stack of eight unpublished manuscripts and rejection letters to match filling her closet. She's sure that if she can just get famous for something, someone will have to publish her books. Why not murder? She'll find a target so mean that she'd actually be doing the world a favor by bumping him or her off. And she knows just the person: Penney Richmond, a high-powered literary agent who's made it her job to ruin people's lives. All Jennifer has to do is frame herself, do the deed, and come out with an iron-clad alibi, and she'll be well on her way to getting a three book deal. So what if she chickens out at the last minute? A vegetarian good girl who rescued a greyhound could never actually kill someone. But when Penney is found murdered and the police think Jennifer did it, she’d better find the real murderer before she goes away... for life. Along with her eccentric writer's group, spunky old ladies with a nose for sleuthing, her neurotic greyhound, and a sexy, sarcastic reporter named Sam, Jennifer embarks on a journey filled with danger, deception, and disguises that could leave her Dying to Get Published...


Compare

Judy Fitzwater's comic mystery tour de force, originally published by Ballantine Books, is finally available in electronic format. Jennifer Marsh is a mystery writer with a stack of eight unpublished manuscripts and rejection letters to match filling her closet. She's sure that if she can just get famous for something, someone will have to publish her books. Why not murder? Judy Fitzwater's comic mystery tour de force, originally published by Ballantine Books, is finally available in electronic format. Jennifer Marsh is a mystery writer with a stack of eight unpublished manuscripts and rejection letters to match filling her closet. She's sure that if she can just get famous for something, someone will have to publish her books. Why not murder? She'll find a target so mean that she'd actually be doing the world a favor by bumping him or her off. And she knows just the person: Penney Richmond, a high-powered literary agent who's made it her job to ruin people's lives. All Jennifer has to do is frame herself, do the deed, and come out with an iron-clad alibi, and she'll be well on her way to getting a three book deal. So what if she chickens out at the last minute? A vegetarian good girl who rescued a greyhound could never actually kill someone. But when Penney is found murdered and the police think Jennifer did it, she’d better find the real murderer before she goes away... for life. Along with her eccentric writer's group, spunky old ladies with a nose for sleuthing, her neurotic greyhound, and a sexy, sarcastic reporter named Sam, Jennifer embarks on a journey filled with danger, deception, and disguises that could leave her Dying to Get Published...

30 review for Dying to Get Published

  1. 5 out of 5

    PattyMacDotComma

    “3.5★ “Jennifer slumped back down on the bed, tears gathering in her eyes. Her hand found the flat of her stomach. “Oh, Jamie,” she whispered. “What kind of mother would I be to you if . . . I would never, never hurt anyone, really I wouldn’t no matter how much they deserved it.” Thank goodness Jaimie didn’t have ears yet – two sets of chromosomes were needed for that. She/He didn’t know, would never know what horrible thoughts her/his mother was capable of. Jennifer would do better. She promised. “3.5★ “Jennifer slumped back down on the bed, tears gathering in her eyes. Her hand found the flat of her stomach. “Oh, Jamie,” she whispered. “What kind of mother would I be to you if . . . I would never, never hurt anyone, really I wouldn’t no matter how much they deserved it.” Thank goodness Jaimie didn’t have ears yet – two sets of chromosomes were needed for that. She/He didn’t know, would never know what horrible thoughts her/his mother was capable of. Jennifer would do better. She promised.” Jennifer is an enthusiastic writer of mysteries, and she has a stack of manuscripts (and rejection slips) in her wardrobe to prove it. She has plans to have a baby she will name Jamie. While she is musing about what it would feel like to really murder someone (I mean, she needs to know for background, right?), she decides to pick a likely candidate from the writer of the nastiest rejection slips. She works out a system. She will choose someone who will improve the world by their absence. She also has a job working with a friend who caters functions, serving platters of canapes and meals at weddings and special occasions, which are attended by celebrities, televison personalities and . . . literary agents. The plot thickens. Meanwhile, she meets with a group of fellow authors every week where they read each other excerpts from what they’re working on and offer suggestions. A romance writer has read a steamy passage which ends abruptly. “Gasping, they parted, her breast heaving with unbridled passion. ‘You must leave before someone finds you here.’” ‘You mean they still didn’t DO it?’ Jennifer asked. ‘Of course they didn’t DO it! I’m building tension here, Jennifer. I don’t know why you can’t grasp the simple dynamics of the genre.’ ‘Don’t worry about Jennifer, Leigh. When she has two people alone in a room together, only one of them comes out alive, Teri said.” Jennifer says she's working on a murder plot for a book and asks for advice., which she takes on board. But this is a light-hearted mystery, and she gets a bit side-tracked by a handsome investigative journalist who decides to help her. She tries to ignore her interest in him, but “Jamie” pipes up now and then to remind her she should be looking for his/her father! She stays on the hunt for her nemesis (who is a particularly unpleasant woman the world would certainly be better off without), and it's fun seeing her attempts to live the part of one of her characters. This is the first in what looks like a good cosy series. Charm and humour, what's not to enjoy?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gary Sundell

    The book opens with our main character, Jennifer Marsh, in jail. Jennifer is an unpublished author of mystery novels. During the story we meet her writers group and a trio of aged "Baker Street Irregulars" who help try and clear Jennifer. A well done first book. I have the next 5 in the series which now numbers 8 books and will be reading the next one soon. For those that find certain tropes anoying....no cop boyfriend and no romantic triangle. The book opens with our main character, Jennifer Marsh, in jail. Jennifer is an unpublished author of mystery novels. During the story we meet her writers group and a trio of aged "Baker Street Irregulars" who help try and clear Jennifer. A well done first book. I have the next 5 in the series which now numbers 8 books and will be reading the next one soon. For those that find certain tropes anoying....no cop boyfriend and no romantic triangle.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alex Cantone

    She steered him down the short hallway and pushed open the bedroom door. Muffy was all over them, panting and licking. She should have stashed her in the bathroom, but it was too small and the dog had a habit of jumping into and out of the bathtub creating a ringing sound like one of those huge, old bells on some boat. Most distracting. "Down, Muffy," Jennifer ordered fruitlessly. Muffy only obeyed when Jennifer's hands weren't full. She was smart like that. Macon (GA) –famous for the Allman Brot She steered him down the short hallway and pushed open the bedroom door. Muffy was all over them, panting and licking. She should have stashed her in the bathroom, but it was too small and the dog had a habit of jumping into and out of the bathtub creating a ringing sound like one of those huge, old bells on some boat. Most distracting. "Down, Muffy," Jennifer ordered fruitlessly. Muffy only obeyed when Jennifer's hands weren't full. She was smart like that. Macon (GA) –famous for the Allman Brothers Band museum – is home to writer, Jennifer Marsh – eight unpublished mystery novels to her credit and a pile of rejection notices. Her “bête noir”, literary agent Penney Richmond, milks wannabe unknowns of their material, pushing it towards big-names to enhance her earnings. Learning that an unknown has found literary success through notoriety, Jennifer plans to “murder” the agent, but needs a cast-iron alibi in her defence: a boyfriend. Journalist Sam Culpepper is trying to get the goods on slimy TV presenter Steve Moore to learn the truth of how Kyle Browning fell to his death from the top of the TV station’s building. For that he needs an attractive woman to inveigle her way in… Two attractive but mismatched people, Jennifer researches her intended victim, exploring scenarios with her writers group and goes in disguise to gain access to the apartment block in Atlanta where the agent lives. Real-life murder—even a walk-through—was far more complicated than the stab'em, shoot'em, choke'em-from-behind stuff she wrote. Actually, she hardly ever wrote the murders. They had already happened before the book opened or they occurred neatly offstage somewhere. She'd never given much thought to how difficult it was. When the agent is found murdered Jennifer is arrested, but can only be charged with sending threatening letters. To clear her name, she and Sam must find the real killer. Not a big fan of “cosies”, but this one had me laughing out loud. Romantic interludes are thwarted at every turn, either by Jennifer’s dog or, as anyone who has tried it in a car will testify… She felt herself being pulled backward, turned and then folded into Sam's arms, cradled firmly against his chest, the emergency brake sticking painfully into her abdomen. Verdict: an enjoyable, light-hearted read, with some interesting elderly ladies adding to the fun.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Glen

    A struggling author writes about the best way to kill a literary agent. Then the agent is killed using her method, making her the primary suspect. An intriguing premise, but just didn't do it for me, but I can't put my finger on just why. Your mileage may vary. A struggling author writes about the best way to kill a literary agent. Then the agent is killed using her method, making her the primary suspect. An intriguing premise, but just didn't do it for me, but I can't put my finger on just why. Your mileage may vary.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    Dying to Get Published is quirky and filled with many funny, head shaking moments. I originally decided to get the book strictly based off of the title and cover. I mean really, what aspiring writer struggling to get their name out there can't identify with a fellow writer who goes off the "deep end" just a little in the name of success. I believe the writing bug probably makes everyone slightly loopy. With that being said although there wasn't a huge amount of romance I enjoyed reading this boo Dying to Get Published is quirky and filled with many funny, head shaking moments. I originally decided to get the book strictly based off of the title and cover. I mean really, what aspiring writer struggling to get their name out there can't identify with a fellow writer who goes off the "deep end" just a little in the name of success. I believe the writing bug probably makes everyone slightly loopy. With that being said although there wasn't a huge amount of romance I enjoyed reading this book and felt that the author wrote a solid story, with a nice pace. The interaction between Jennifer and her writing critique group as well as her unknowing partner in crime Sam Culpepper was really well scripted throughout the book. The only thing I wasn't completely sold on was some of the office scenes towards the end of the book. It just didn't feel completely believable to me. Overall it was a good read. This book is the first in a series of six of The Jennifer Marsh Mysteries and I would absolutely recommend it as a funny mystery novel to pickup.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Judie

    Jennifer Marsh really wanted to have her book published. After holding Jennifer’s manuscript for a year, agent Penney Richmond told her it wouldn’t sell and refused to speak with her. Jennifer decided she would kill murder someone as a research project so her story would be more realistic and she would learn how murderers thought. Jennifer talked to the other members of her writing class to get suggestions about how to commit the murder: gaining access to the victim, establishing the alibi, cho Jennifer Marsh really wanted to have her book published. After holding Jennifer’s manuscript for a year, agent Penney Richmond told her it wouldn’t sell and refused to speak with her. Jennifer decided she would kill murder someone as a research project so her story would be more realistic and she would learn how murderers thought. Jennifer talked to the other members of her writing class to get suggestions about how to commit the murder: gaining access to the victim, establishing the alibi, choosing the weapon, etc. It didn’t take Jennifer long to learn that Penney had a lot of enemies so she decided that Penney would be the victim. Along the way, she learned about a news anchor who allegedly committed suicide by jumping off a roof and gets involved in finding out the truth behind his death. Eventually she began having doubts about actually murdering Penney. “Why had she ever thought that walking through some idiotic plan would give her some secret element that would finally make her books sell? Was that all she wanted out of life? “She wanted to be published more than almost anything in this world, but this charade was not the way to do it. She’d never know how a murderer felt. She couldn’t conceive of it.” After she reached this conclusion, Penney was murdered and Jennifer was seen at the location and her alibi fell apart. Jennifer was the prime suspect. To save herself, she had to find the real murderer. The book was witty. In one segment, while she is trying to determine how much poison she would have to use to knock out the person who was to be her alibi, she poured wine into two glasses, a blue one for him and a pink one for herself. “She’d seen too many whodunits–not to mention Danny Kay’s flagon-with-the-dragon, chalice-with-the-palace routine–where the drugged glass got switched to leave herself guessing which one had the pills. Blue was for boys; pink was for girls.” The story includes several interesting, well-developed characters as well as humorous, clever sidelines. One elderly woman, who Jennifer cultivated as part of her plot, told the police she had seen Jennifer in the building. She also served the officers tea but deliberately placed the tea bags into the cups of coffee to sabotage her reliability. Another woman referred to a Miss Georgia winner who sang and danced ballet simultaneously. Subplots include her yet to be born child. No, she wasn’t pregnant or in a relationship but very much wanted to get married and have a baby whom she had named “Jaimie.” (“Jennifer had hoped to make a scrapbook for little Jaimie detailing his/her mother’s success before his/her– dang this gender nonsense–birth.” DYING TO GET PUBLISHED is the first of the Jennifer Marsh mysteries. I look forward to reading her future adventures. This book was a free Amazon download.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah (Workaday Reads)

    Funny in an omg-did-that-just-happen sort of way. Once you get past how ridiculous the main character seems at first glance, the story is quick and amusing. The love interests are totally adorable together.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Betty Ost-Everley

    My, was that fun! Like Jennifer, I have also submitted a novel several times to receive a stack of rejection letters, and I immediately bonded with her character. I thought this was a great little read, and really enjoyed Fitzwater's humor, laughing out loud several times. I have already downloaded the second book in the series and can hardly wait to see what trouble Jennifer finds herself. Found myself comparing these favorably to the Richard Castle books. Highly recommend to those seeking a fu My, was that fun! Like Jennifer, I have also submitted a novel several times to receive a stack of rejection letters, and I immediately bonded with her character. I thought this was a great little read, and really enjoyed Fitzwater's humor, laughing out loud several times. I have already downloaded the second book in the series and can hardly wait to see what trouble Jennifer finds herself. Found myself comparing these favorably to the Richard Castle books. Highly recommend to those seeking a fun, light story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ted Tayler

    "Stop clowning around, and read this" I enjoyed the style of this one. The humour helped keep my interest throughout. A decent story line, two strong lead characters, and a full supporting cast. I could get to like Ms Fitzwalter's work if the rest of the Jennifer Marsh series is a good as this one. "Stop clowning around, and read this" I enjoyed the style of this one. The humour helped keep my interest throughout. A decent story line, two strong lead characters, and a full supporting cast. I could get to like Ms Fitzwalter's work if the rest of the Jennifer Marsh series is a good as this one.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ashlee

    This book was just so-so. It took a bit too long to grasp my attention, with a lot of uninteresting details. I also wish the ending would have been wrapped up a little better. On the positive side, until it was uncovered, I didn't realize who actually committed the murder. This book was just so-so. It took a bit too long to grasp my attention, with a lot of uninteresting details. I also wish the ending would have been wrapped up a little better. On the positive side, until it was uncovered, I didn't realize who actually committed the murder.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Readingmom

    I was hoping this book would be another well written, quick read. Instead, I received a mediocre "mystery" that centered around an unlikable protagonist who I kind of preferred be jailed rather than being able to clear her name. In case you can't tell, I was not a very large fan of this book. My main problem is the protagonist. Jennifer Marsh is a mystery writer who has eight books written, and none of them published. Despite her persistence in trying to find an agent, she has received some intere I was hoping this book would be another well written, quick read. Instead, I received a mediocre "mystery" that centered around an unlikable protagonist who I kind of preferred be jailed rather than being able to clear her name. In case you can't tell, I was not a very large fan of this book. My main problem is the protagonist. Jennifer Marsh is a mystery writer who has eight books written, and none of them published. Despite her persistence in trying to find an agent, she has received some interest that really only tied up her ability to try to sell a novel for a year, and which resulted in an unpleasant phone call. But Jennifer Marsh is not very nice, possibly crazy, and kind of boring. It is the last adjective that really clinches her unlikability for me. Crazy characters have been done well. The same goes for possibly crazy characters. Bitchy can be fun and entertaining - though it was less so with Ms. Marsh, who was mean to everyone, yet still felt entitled to receive kind behavior from others. Jennifer also rebuffed the advances of every man she came across - which would be fine if she wasn't desperate to become pregnant, and talking to the uninseminated ova in her womb by the gender neutral name "Jamie" on a consistent basis. Yet above and beyond the sense of entitlement, there is that sense of boring, which simply makes a reader say: "Why should I care?" I kept reading, because I liked the idea of the story - kind of. Basically, the story centers around the idea of a mystery writer who hinges dangerously between actually attempting to commit a murder, and seeing if she can get away with everything leading up to a murder without actually committing it, all in the name of research. The end goal is supposed to be a marketable novel that she can sell. The actual result is that the reader is unsure of whether or not this chick is crazy and is going to kill a mean literary agent. So this novel could have been fascinating. Yet with the unlikable protagonist, it was simply a quick read. I don't recommend it, but might be being too harsh because I was not a fan of the protagonist.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Landmark

    Quirky, funny at times, and a satisfying read for the most part. I liked this book but I didn't love it. The main character, Jennifer, was likeable in many ways and I could definitely sympathize with her frustration at not being published. But...she also engaged in some very questionable and downright stupid decisions and actions. I could only shake my head at the depths to which she was prepared to go to get herself noticed, which, needless to say, backfired on her. What in heaven's name were yo Quirky, funny at times, and a satisfying read for the most part. I liked this book but I didn't love it. The main character, Jennifer, was likeable in many ways and I could definitely sympathize with her frustration at not being published. But...she also engaged in some very questionable and downright stupid decisions and actions. I could only shake my head at the depths to which she was prepared to go to get herself noticed, which, needless to say, backfired on her. What in heaven's name were you thinking, girl?? And, her habit of continually talking and referring to the as-yet-unconceived "Jaime" was amusing at first but rapidly became annoying after a while. Mrs. Walker was a fun, eccentric character, and Sam was quite adequate as the romantic interest. I thought Jennifer's treatment of him was a little cruel at times and I admired his tolerance of her behaviour. All in all, I enjoyed this novel enough to try the second one in the series.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Jennifer marsh can't seem to get published, why? Obviously her books are missing something. She decides to think like a killer, and plans to murder the literary agent who snubbed her book. I expected to like this book more than I did. It was a quick read, but I couldn't get into the characters at all. Jennifer annoyed me, especially when she drugged Sam just to see if he would think that they had spent the night together even if he couldn't remember it. And I didn't like how Jennifer justified c Jennifer marsh can't seem to get published, why? Obviously her books are missing something. She decides to think like a killer, and plans to murder the literary agent who snubbed her book. I expected to like this book more than I did. It was a quick read, but I couldn't get into the characters at all. Jennifer annoyed me, especially when she drugged Sam just to see if he would think that they had spent the night together even if he couldn't remember it. And I didn't like how Jennifer justified committing murder in the name of research. I know it's supposed to be a light cozy mystery, but it wasn't completely believable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alannah Davis

    I've read a couple of later books in the Jennifer Marsh series. I snapped up this one, the first in the series, after finding I could get it on my Nook for free. I very much enjoyed this. Witty, fun, and filled with delightfully whimsical characters such as the salty old lady who practically adopts Jennifer (who is in disguise as a frumpy pregnant woman at the time). I found the constant references to Jennifer's as-yet-unconceived child to be annoying and far too abundant. However, the rest of t I've read a couple of later books in the Jennifer Marsh series. I snapped up this one, the first in the series, after finding I could get it on my Nook for free. I very much enjoyed this. Witty, fun, and filled with delightfully whimsical characters such as the salty old lady who practically adopts Jennifer (who is in disguise as a frumpy pregnant woman at the time). I found the constant references to Jennifer's as-yet-unconceived child to be annoying and far too abundant. However, the rest of the ride is worth it. I've already downloaded another book from the series.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Debbie’s reviews 🌸📚📚📚🌸

    Borrow this one from the library if you can.. Was just okay for me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kenya Starflight

    I probably should have realized from the description of this book that it wasn't going to have one of the most likable protagonists. But despite the plot coming off as a little dark, I thought it would be played for humor -- sometimes a dark concept can still be played for laughs and be entertaining. But "Dying to Get Published" isn't nearly as funny as it wants to think it is, and is not only poorly written but has an unlikable, borderline-sociopathic protagonist whose behavior is trying desper I probably should have realized from the description of this book that it wasn't going to have one of the most likable protagonists. But despite the plot coming off as a little dark, I thought it would be played for humor -- sometimes a dark concept can still be played for laughs and be entertaining. But "Dying to Get Published" isn't nearly as funny as it wants to think it is, and is not only poorly written but has an unlikable, borderline-sociopathic protagonist whose behavior is trying desperately to be quirky but comes across as forced and unbalanced. Jennifer Marsh is a caterer who desperately wants to be an author... but despite having written eight manuscripts, she can't seem to get published. So she comes up with a reckless plan -- murder someone, get charged for the crime, escape with an ironclad alibi, and get a book deal out of it. She even has the perfect victim lined up -- the literary agent she holds responsible for ruining her dreams. But when said agent gets murdered without her help, leaving her as the main suspect, she's going to need help from a lonely old woman, a handsome news anchor, and her writing group to find the real killer and clear her name. The writing in this book is fairly bland and unremarkable, and every joke feels forced or telegraphed way ahead of time. Most characters' personalities are pretty grating, with Mrs. Walker being the most tolerable, and every male character is either a lecher to some degree (even the yawningly boring love interest) or just an idiot. The murder mystery is undercut with a rather dull secondary mystery about a scandal involving a now-dead news anchor, and honestly that mystery was boring and kept detracting from the main mystery. The main character was just unlikable as well. We're supposed to believe she's a good girl with a big heart (the fact that she's Christian, vegetarian, and has a rescue dog), but she not only plans to murder someone to further her career (and I don't care if her victim's a jerk, it's still murder), she constantly belittles her supposed writing friends, uses people like tools, and shows little remorse for her actions. It doesn't help that she's constantly forgiven for her actions by the people she wronged... and her quirk of talking to her unborn child (who hasn't even been conceived yet) gets obnoxious fast. I'm sure there are entertaining mysteries out there set in the publishing world... but "Dying to Get Published" isn't one of them. Between the awful main character, the bland writing, and the forced attempts at humor, it was an utterly bland read. At least it's a quick one...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Roddy Williams

    Jennifer Marsh has written at least eight novels but has had no luck publishing anything. Watching Oprah Windrey one say she sees a woman being interviewed who was falsely accused of murder and now has a best selling book. This gives Jennifer the idea that were she able to carry out the perfect murder, and have a watertight alibi, she too could be a best selling author. She also has the perfect victim in mind, Penney Richmond, an unscrupulous sociopathic literary agent who, it seems, has been re Jennifer Marsh has written at least eight novels but has had no luck publishing anything. Watching Oprah Windrey one say she sees a woman being interviewed who was falsely accused of murder and now has a best selling book. This gives Jennifer the idea that were she able to carry out the perfect murder, and have a watertight alibi, she too could be a best selling author. She also has the perfect victim in mind, Penney Richmond, an unscrupulous sociopathic literary agent who, it seems, has been responsible for ripping off and demoralising countless authors. Via her work with a catering company, Jennifer meets Sam, a handsome young journalist who wants her to assist him with an investigation into the apparent suicide of a TV presenter. Jennifer puts her plan into action but at the last minute decides she is not actually the murderous type and leaves the scene of her attempted crime. Later she is arrested as it seems someone else had exactly the same idea and murdered Penney Richmond anyway. It's up to Jennifer and Sam then to identify the real killer. It's not bad at all, this. An enjoyable read with some interesting characters. One might suggest that the protagonist, who has written several unpublished crime novels, might well have come up with a better plan, but that's a minor point. The plot is decent enough and the murderer was something of a surprise, at least for me. It's funny without trying too hard to be funny and it ticks all the boxes as an amusing cosy murder mystery.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Reads A-Lot

    In the beginning, Jennifer was in jail, only toying with the idea of murder. But she was no murderer; she was a caterer and a mystery novelist. She has written 8 novels―all unpublished. For her, writing was just something she had to do. "Death of an agent would certainly be symbolic for any struggling author." (LOC 91) Her plan was simple: commit a murder to get published. This story seemed interesting. I mean, I could relate to being a published author and wanting to get your stories out there. Bu In the beginning, Jennifer was in jail, only toying with the idea of murder. But she was no murderer; she was a caterer and a mystery novelist. She has written 8 novels―all unpublished. For her, writing was just something she had to do. "Death of an agent would certainly be symbolic for any struggling author." (LOC 91) Her plan was simple: commit a murder to get published. This story seemed interesting. I mean, I could relate to being a published author and wanting to get your stories out there. But does she really kill someone to do it? Seems a little drastic to me. Still, I wondered if Jennifer would actually go through with it. Too many characters made it hard to keep track of the story. The reading gets long-winded and scattered. Overall, I guess this was okay, but it just wasn't exactly what I was expecting.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    Odd beginning but.... First few pages were a pinch. But then it went back to the set up. And it was a bit weird. Not at all like I expected. But the more I read, the easier it got to get involved in the story. It’s an easy , fast paced book. The characters were interesting. The setting could be a bit stronger. The action was well paced. Wasn’t so sure about the clues. There didn’t seem to be many red herrings, unless they were so well hidden I missed them. Alas, I thought the main character was a Odd beginning but.... First few pages were a pinch. But then it went back to the set up. And it was a bit weird. Not at all like I expected. But the more I read, the easier it got to get involved in the story. It’s an easy , fast paced book. The characters were interesting. The setting could be a bit stronger. The action was well paced. Wasn’t so sure about the clues. There didn’t seem to be many red herrings, unless they were so well hidden I missed them. Alas, I thought the main character was a bit dumb. But seemed to shine more others were around. Maybe this character (or maybe the author) needs a more constant sidekick, instead of having a handful of one scene doers. But I am willing to give the 2nd book a shot

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mikayla MacIntyre

    Jennifer Marsh, an unpublished mystery author, decides to be as realistic as possible when it comes to planning a murder. I picked up this book while browsing the Kindle store, and I can safely say that the author did not disappoint. The author made a very likable, VERY relatable main character who I came to love, created a mystery that intrigued me to the end, and made supporting characters that dealt just the right emotions at the right time. This book was fantastic for me, and I hope you enjo Jennifer Marsh, an unpublished mystery author, decides to be as realistic as possible when it comes to planning a murder. I picked up this book while browsing the Kindle store, and I can safely say that the author did not disappoint. The author made a very likable, VERY relatable main character who I came to love, created a mystery that intrigued me to the end, and made supporting characters that dealt just the right emotions at the right time. This book was fantastic for me, and I hope you enjoy it as well.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Holladay

    It took me about three weeks to read this book, forcing myself to read one or two chapters a day. Why? Because it did not grab my interest, but wasn't bad enough to quit reading (that would have been a one star). I didn't like the main character at all and the secondary characters weren't fleshed out enough to really care about (except Mrs. Walker, I really liked her). The main character seems stupid and immature (the two don't necessarily go hand in hand). It took me about three weeks to read this book, forcing myself to read one or two chapters a day. Why? Because it did not grab my interest, but wasn't bad enough to quit reading (that would have been a one star). I didn't like the main character at all and the secondary characters weren't fleshed out enough to really care about (except Mrs. Walker, I really liked her). The main character seems stupid and immature (the two don't necessarily go hand in hand).

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    It was readable. The protagonist is odd and pulls some of the most harebrained stunts I've ever read. At times, she almost makes Stephanie Plum seem capable. A "comic mystery tour de force"? No. Occasionally mildly amusing, but more often stupid and unbelievable. The best part was the elderly Mrs. Walker's list of games and what they mean when investigating. I'll only read another of these books if I have nothing else. It was readable. The protagonist is odd and pulls some of the most harebrained stunts I've ever read. At times, she almost makes Stephanie Plum seem capable. A "comic mystery tour de force"? No. Occasionally mildly amusing, but more often stupid and unbelievable. The best part was the elderly Mrs. Walker's list of games and what they mean when investigating. I'll only read another of these books if I have nothing else.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Patricia MacCallum

    Dying to Get Published (The Jennifer Marsh Mysteries Book 1) Laugh out loud funny! If you need a break, this book, first in the series, will keep you turning the pages on the outrageous antics of the characters. Great beach or fireside read. Looking forward to the next book. Highly recommend!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kathi

    Week 29 of the 2018 Reading Challenge: A book with a "Clue" weapon on the cover or title (lead pipe, revolver, rope, candlestick, dagger, wrench) YAWN. This book was boring and the main character is totally unlikable. Week 29 of the 2018 Reading Challenge: A book with a "Clue" weapon on the cover or title (lead pipe, revolver, rope, candlestick, dagger, wrench) YAWN. This book was boring and the main character is totally unlikable.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris Blackton

    This book was written in an unusual fashion -- two chapter with sub chapters. The first half or chapter was confusing and I almost gave up. Since I am not a quitter I persevered and fortunately the last part of the book was much better.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    I enjoyed the story in the end but it started out slow. I was more than 50% through it before it start to pick up.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Easy quick read, ok for a 'filler' book Easy quick read, ok for a 'filler' book

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tricia Maloney

    This was a fun book to read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maite

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What's up with that ending??? She's been pushed around and she just accept it. 😡 What's up with that ending??? She's been pushed around and she just accept it. 😡

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    Amusing cozy mystery featuring a would be crime novelist and her friends.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.