counter create hit Psychiatric Power: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1973-1974 - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Psychiatric Power: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1973-1974

Availability: Ready to download

In Psychiatric Power, the fourth volume in the collection of his groundbreaking lectures at the Collège de France, Michel Foucault addresses and expands upon the ideas in his seminal Madness and Civilization, sketching the genealogy of psychiatry and of its characteristic form of power/knowledge. Madness and Civilization undertook the archeology of the division according t In Psychiatric Power, the fourth volume in the collection of his groundbreaking lectures at the Collège de France, Michel Foucault addresses and expands upon the ideas in his seminal Madness and Civilization, sketching the genealogy of psychiatry and of its characteristic form of power/knowledge. Madness and Civilization undertook the archeology of the division according to which, in Western Society, the madman found himself separated from the sane. That book ends with the medicalization of madness at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Psychiatric Power continues this discourse up to the end of the nineteenth century, and the double "depsychiatrization" of madness, now dispersed between the neurologist and the psychoanalyst. Presented in a conversational tone, Psychiatric Power brings fresh access and light to the work of one of the past century's preeminent thinkers.


Compare

In Psychiatric Power, the fourth volume in the collection of his groundbreaking lectures at the Collège de France, Michel Foucault addresses and expands upon the ideas in his seminal Madness and Civilization, sketching the genealogy of psychiatry and of its characteristic form of power/knowledge. Madness and Civilization undertook the archeology of the division according t In Psychiatric Power, the fourth volume in the collection of his groundbreaking lectures at the Collège de France, Michel Foucault addresses and expands upon the ideas in his seminal Madness and Civilization, sketching the genealogy of psychiatry and of its characteristic form of power/knowledge. Madness and Civilization undertook the archeology of the division according to which, in Western Society, the madman found himself separated from the sane. That book ends with the medicalization of madness at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Psychiatric Power continues this discourse up to the end of the nineteenth century, and the double "depsychiatrization" of madness, now dispersed between the neurologist and the psychoanalyst. Presented in a conversational tone, Psychiatric Power brings fresh access and light to the work of one of the past century's preeminent thinkers.

30 review for Psychiatric Power: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1973-1974

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bere Tarará

    Un análisis pormenorizado de las prácticas psiquiátricas, lo cual ayuda a entender el panorama actual, muy necesario para comprender la epidemia actual de las enfermedades mentales y el movimiento de la antipsiquiatría

  2. 4 out of 5

    xDEAD ENDx

    This course really sets the stage for Foucault's later works and ideas. We find the panopticon, power/knowledge, Truth, a medicine of sexuality, and the early formations of the dispositif. One of the topics in particular I found interesting is the relationships Foucault points out between the Family and psychiatry and the transition from sovereign power to disciplinary power. This course really sets the stage for Foucault's later works and ideas. We find the panopticon, power/knowledge, Truth, a medicine of sexuality, and the early formations of the dispositif. One of the topics in particular I found interesting is the relationships Foucault points out between the Family and psychiatry and the transition from sovereign power to disciplinary power.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elsie

    Hooray for humble philosophy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elari

    So I managed to finish my twenty-page summary exactly five minutes before midnight. Here's the paper's conclusion as a review. Le pouvoir psychiatrique de Michel Foucault se distingue par son analyse de la psychiatrie qui franchit les frontières de l’institution. Le cours retrace l’évolution du pouvoir psychiatrique sous sa forme diffuse et intrusive, né de rituels religieux, mûri dans le capitalisme, parasitant le noyau familial, pour s’abriter finalement entre les murs de l’asile. L’éloquence So I managed to finish my twenty-page summary exactly five minutes before midnight. Here's the paper's conclusion as a review. Le pouvoir psychiatrique de Michel Foucault se distingue par son analyse de la psychiatrie qui franchit les frontières de l’institution. Le cours retrace l’évolution du pouvoir psychiatrique sous sa forme diffuse et intrusive, né de rituels religieux, mûri dans le capitalisme, parasitant le noyau familial, pour s’abriter finalement entre les murs de l’asile. L’éloquence de Foucault est inexorable : le pouvoir psychiatrique a, en son temps, rongé des corps et détruit des vies. Les répercussions à travers les âges ont été si atroces qu’elles se font toujours ressentir aujourd’hui, que ce soit dans les milieux scientifiques et cliniques (où l’embarras est palpable dans la confusion générale et l’incertitude des connaissances), ou dans les milieux profanes (où la méfiance domine). Suite à la lecture du livre, une question sinistre s’accroche à mes pensées, que Foucault pose d’ailleurs sous une forme modifiée : « est-il possible que la production de la vérité de la folie puisse s’effectuer dans des formes qui ne sont pas celles du rapport de connaissance ? » (p. 351). Est-il possible de découvrir ne serait-ce qu’un fragment de vérité sur la folie qui ne soit pas souillé par l’infinie lutte entre pouvoir et savoir ? Y a-t-il ici des formes de savoirs qui n’engagent pas de rapports de force ? Même si ces questions ne trouvent pas de réponses définitives, elles doivent être posées par tout neuroscientifique, tout psychiatre, et même tout patient. Pour qu’elles soient posées, Le pouvoir psychiatrique doit être lu, par tout neuroscientifique, tout psychiatre, tout patient. Mes pensées m’ont mises à bout de souffle et à bout de mots. J’essaie simplement de dire que le livre est beau, et fait réfléchir.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Steven Van Neste

    There is a power to Focault's lectures which is not there (at least not as much) in his normal publications. Although at first "Psychiatric Power" might seem as a revisitation of "History Of Madness", it is far from. The actual idea of psychiatry is second to games of power and as such many of the ideas in these lectures are much closer to "discipline and punish". The main thesis is that first appearance of psychiatry was not as much a science of the mind and of curing the mentally ill, much rath There is a power to Focault's lectures which is not there (at least not as much) in his normal publications. Although at first "Psychiatric Power" might seem as a revisitation of "History Of Madness", it is far from. The actual idea of psychiatry is second to games of power and as such many of the ideas in these lectures are much closer to "discipline and punish". The main thesis is that first appearance of psychiatry was not as much a science of the mind and of curing the mentally ill, much rather it was an economic intervention through which a whole new shemata of power games came in to play. It is only with neurology that a genuine medical inquiry into the mind comes to be which (at least attempts) to stay free from perceived power games.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Yulia Pomarina

    It is a best book of 1st half of 2013 year in my rating! It is very hard to read, as if you must try to go through jungle and you must cut the wreathed lianas with your machete to move further in one else step. But as you let yourself take the height of this great philosopher's mind you are almost swept over with the freshness and humanism of the book on such a hard topic. What is normality and HOW doctors of medicine turned into people who is powerable to label it? That is the point. It is a best book of 1st half of 2013 year in my rating! It is very hard to read, as if you must try to go through jungle and you must cut the wreathed lianas with your machete to move further in one else step. But as you let yourself take the height of this great philosopher's mind you are almost swept over with the freshness and humanism of the book on such a hard topic. What is normality and HOW doctors of medicine turned into people who is powerable to label it? That is the point.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nitanews

    Great discussion of sovereign and disciplinary powers here. Also some good stuff on the historial discourses of truth. There are some gems you won't find in Madness and Civilization. Great discussion of sovereign and disciplinary powers here. Also some good stuff on the historial discourses of truth. There are some gems you won't find in Madness and Civilization.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chris Estey

    But it's not like people abuse it, right? Man, I hope that psychologist who assisted the Army in torturing the detainees burns in fucking hell. But it's not like people abuse it, right? Man, I hope that psychologist who assisted the Army in torturing the detainees burns in fucking hell.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Scott Neigh

    Reviewed here. Reviewed here.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Warren Fournier

    When this book came out, I remember it created quite a stir among some circles, which is quite something considering the words printed in this volume are from almost 50 years ago. My psychiatric colleagues grumbled and mumbled about it being "more anti-psychiatry nonsense like those scientology people," so I had to run out to the nearest Borders and buy it for 18 bucks. Actually, I would not consider the thoughts in this book to be really "anti" anything, as Foucault was a careful and devoted his When this book came out, I remember it created quite a stir among some circles, which is quite something considering the words printed in this volume are from almost 50 years ago. My psychiatric colleagues grumbled and mumbled about it being "more anti-psychiatry nonsense like those scientology people," so I had to run out to the nearest Borders and buy it for 18 bucks. Actually, I would not consider the thoughts in this book to be really "anti" anything, as Foucault was a careful and devoted historian and academic. His theories are always well researched and he couches his thoughts in a very detached manner, allowing the reader to come up with their own conclusions. That being said, this book is a translation of actual lectures at the College de France, so it takes on a more conversational tone than his usual books, and as such, he cannot help but throw in some almost subliminal witticisms against the field of psychiatry that poke the kind of gentle but acerbic fun that the French do so well. The book can be considered a companion piece to his classic "Madness and Civilization," expounding on his analysis of the sources of "power" throughout the history of psychiatric medicine, and here he takes that analysis to the point of the dawn of modern psychotropic meds, during which Foucault was still living when he was giving these lectures in the early 1970s. It would have been fascinating to have been able to read his thoughts on the evolution of psychiatric power during the heyday of Big Pharma and the Prozac-age, but alas, his unfortunate death in the 80s deprived us of a full development of such analysis. Psychiatric power, for Foucault, was and still is a formidable force, one that has been able to dethrone kings. He gives a fascinating account of how the doctor and his aides handled the mad King George, supplanting sovereign power for disciplinary power. Further on, Foucault reads off many jaw-dropping texts and first-hand accounts from the annals of psychiatry literature and the notes from patient files, shedding light through these documents on the inner workings behind the walls of the old asylums. As a psychiatrist, it makes me appreciate how far we've come from the punitive days of strapping patients to basement floors and dousing their scalps with scalding water, but also how little has changed in some ways. Foucault traces how, though the straps may have come off, power was maintained in the psychiatric world through the simple authority of the Doctors' knowledge of which their certificates, white coats, and commanding manner of speech were testimonials. Power was further maintained as times changed via statutory revisions, judiciary commitments, the isolation of patients from family and visitors, the design of psychiatric hospitals, hypnosis and mesmerism, and finally to the development of neurologic differential diagnosis. These all were adaptations to maintain an unequal balance of power. And he further explores the resistances and attempts by patients to regain power, including the odd but interesting assertion that the epidemic of hysteria in the late 1800s was such an attempt. Extensive footnotes and citations gave me a plethora of new books to add to my queue, as the quotations of so many works by the greats of early psychiatric practice like Charcot are all so mind-blowing that I simply had to read the source material. I think you'll find this book an absorbing historical exercise if anything else. My main complaint about this book is that the translators seemed to struggle at times with how to properly convey the French, and we end up with some incomprehensible and sometimes inconsistent phrasing, as well as odd choices of words like "obnubilation." But overall, the final product is a remarkable result of painstaking efforts of scholarship. Whether or not you agree with Foucault, one cannot help but become engrossed in his work and to never think about power relationships, including those of our own government system, in the same way again.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Antczak

    Interesting ideas about the origins of psychiatry and the "disciplinary" society of the modern world's prisons, schools, asylums, and factories/workplaces. Difficult to read, hard to understand. Interesting ideas about the origins of psychiatry and the "disciplinary" society of the modern world's prisons, schools, asylums, and factories/workplaces. Difficult to read, hard to understand.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Pascal

    Too bad no one reads this excellent book on psychiatric power. Love it so much.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Janice Feng

    Foucault at his finest.

  14. 5 out of 5

    8314

    Foucault was slow on spotting the internal aspects of human during his lecture in 1981-1984 (the whole sequence of Government of the Living, Hermeneutics of the Subjects, Government of Self and Others, The Courage of Truth). It turned out that he wasn't very sharp on this matter back in 1974 either, when he talked about psychiatry, which was a subject that specialized on taming the internal world. I don't know how others would respond to this. I found it to be ironic. Foucault treated this notion Foucault was slow on spotting the internal aspects of human during his lecture in 1981-1984 (the whole sequence of Government of the Living, Hermeneutics of the Subjects, Government of Self and Others, The Courage of Truth). It turned out that he wasn't very sharp on this matter back in 1974 either, when he talked about psychiatry, which was a subject that specialized on taming the internal world. I don't know how others would respond to this. I found it to be ironic. Foucault treated this notion "the Will to Power" seriously enough to find power relationships within society. He has, in fact, said at some point that our conceptualization of a thing called "power" doesn't quite exist in the real world -- it is more of a property of certain interpersonal relations. That explained, sadly, only a half part of Nietzsche's concept. The other half is strictly personal; within the individual you can still find every template of political dramas that was played outside and throughout history. Psychiatric treatment have a huge and essential impact on this internal world, which, Foucault, sadly due to his Frenchness, ignored. It is interaction rather than domination. It is compromise rather than vanquish. It is "Each is led by his liking" rather than "Thou shall not worship any other gods". For the tactics of psychiatry to work, one needs a functioning ego, a will triumphing over other wills, to persuade, to trick, to force into obedience. That ego may be wrong on facts, but it has to be present -- its existence the premise of this machinery. And the interaction, the battle between the patient and the psychiatrist, inasmuch as there are two functioning egos, is the whole point. The case of "the person of myself" falls out of the domain exactly because there is no such ego. Sadly the motivations of the patient is always lacking in Foucault's narrative, he only tried to understand the motivations of the strong, namely, psychiatrists, and later on the hysterics. That being said, Foucault's neglect to the internal part of the patient is almost unforgivable. I cannot say that I am completely over Foucault. But this is a bummer. It's still a very nice piece, but I have higher expectations for him. Perhaps too high.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Slay

    A remarkably insightful and provocative course which should be more widely dispersed across those disciplines it involves so intimately. That said, it is without a doubt foundational to and anticipatory of the following: "In the 1990s, anthropologists and philosophers of science unravelled the intricate history of traumatic memory and post-traumatic stress syndrome... In the process they have taught us that mental illness, like many other complex scientific facts, are invented and real at the sam A remarkably insightful and provocative course which should be more widely dispersed across those disciplines it involves so intimately. That said, it is without a doubt foundational to and anticipatory of the following: "In the 1990s, anthropologists and philosophers of science unravelled the intricate history of traumatic memory and post-traumatic stress syndrome... In the process they have taught us that mental illness, like many other complex scientific facts, are invented and real at the same time because the ontological bases of such illnesses can never be separated from the epistemological apparatus that are used to define and treat them. On the one hand, a disorder such as PTSD is 'glued together by the practices, technologies, and narratives with which it is diagnosed, studied, treated and represented'. On the other hand, 'the reality of PTSD is confirmed empirically by its place in people's lives, by their experiences and convictions, and by the personal and collective investments that have been made in it'..." Kansteiner, Wulf; "Genealogy of a Category Mistake: A Critical Intellectual History of the Cultural Trauma Metaphor;" Rethinking History 8 (2004); 212 This does not just apply to PTSD, the Hysterics of the Victorian era, and our Borderlines of today... it is equally disheartening that it takes decades to disseminate as complex a fact pattern so relevant to our age.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Engberg

    This book expands of the practice of psychiatry as it is discussed in Birth of the Clinic, Madness and Civilization, and History of Madness. Like all of his lectures, the language is pretty accessible, sometimes in contrast to his aforementioned monographs. He draws some interesting conclusions about the relationship between sexuality and the patient/analyst dynamic that I haven't quite decided what to think of. This book expands of the practice of psychiatry as it is discussed in Birth of the Clinic, Madness and Civilization, and History of Madness. Like all of his lectures, the language is pretty accessible, sometimes in contrast to his aforementioned monographs. He draws some interesting conclusions about the relationship between sexuality and the patient/analyst dynamic that I haven't quite decided what to think of.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    I like Foucault's lectures better than his writings. This is the fourth of his lectures that I have read. I was waiting for it to come out in paper back. I think this work is better than Madness and Civilization. Foucault explains the role of psychiatry in the 18th century transition from sovereign power to disciplinary power of the 19th century. I like Foucault's lectures better than his writings. This is the fourth of his lectures that I have read. I was waiting for it to come out in paper back. I think this work is better than Madness and Civilization. Foucault explains the role of psychiatry in the 18th century transition from sovereign power to disciplinary power of the 19th century.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hocine Dimerdji

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zohreh

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ervinos

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tracey Weldon

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emiliano

  23. 5 out of 5

    Polly

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shřøøq Shẻrif

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dumitru Ursu

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Padron

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maria

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.