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Education and the Crisis of Public Values: Challenging the Assault on Teachers, Students, & Public Education

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This book was awarded a CHOICE outstanding Academic Title and has received the Annual O. L. Davis, Jr. Outstanding Book Award from the AATC (American Association for Teaching and Curriculum) and the AESA (American Educational Studies Association) Critics Choice Award 2012. Education and the Crisis of Public Values examines American society's shift away from democratic publ This book was awarded a CHOICE outstanding Academic Title and has received the Annual O. L. Davis, Jr. Outstanding Book Award from the AATC (American Association for Teaching and Curriculum) and the AESA (American Educational Studies Association) Critics Choice Award 2012. Education and the Crisis of Public Values examines American society's shift away from democratic public values, the ensuing move toward a market-driven mode of education, and the last decade's growing social disinvestment in youth. The book discusses the number of ways that the ideal of public education as a democratic public sphere has been under siege, including full-fledged attacks by corporate interests on public school teachers, schools of education, and teacher unions. It also reveals how a business culture cloaked in the guise of generosity and reform has supported a charter school movement that aims to dismantle public schools in favor of a corporate-friendly privatized system. The book encourages educators to become public intellectuals, willing to engage in creating a formative culture of learning that can nurture the ability to defend public and higher education as a general good - one crucial to sustaining a critical citizenry and a democratic society.


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This book was awarded a CHOICE outstanding Academic Title and has received the Annual O. L. Davis, Jr. Outstanding Book Award from the AATC (American Association for Teaching and Curriculum) and the AESA (American Educational Studies Association) Critics Choice Award 2012. Education and the Crisis of Public Values examines American society's shift away from democratic publ This book was awarded a CHOICE outstanding Academic Title and has received the Annual O. L. Davis, Jr. Outstanding Book Award from the AATC (American Association for Teaching and Curriculum) and the AESA (American Educational Studies Association) Critics Choice Award 2012. Education and the Crisis of Public Values examines American society's shift away from democratic public values, the ensuing move toward a market-driven mode of education, and the last decade's growing social disinvestment in youth. The book discusses the number of ways that the ideal of public education as a democratic public sphere has been under siege, including full-fledged attacks by corporate interests on public school teachers, schools of education, and teacher unions. It also reveals how a business culture cloaked in the guise of generosity and reform has supported a charter school movement that aims to dismantle public schools in favor of a corporate-friendly privatized system. The book encourages educators to become public intellectuals, willing to engage in creating a formative culture of learning that can nurture the ability to defend public and higher education as a general good - one crucial to sustaining a critical citizenry and a democratic society.

30 review for Education and the Crisis of Public Values: Challenging the Assault on Teachers, Students, & Public Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathrina

    From now on, anytime I start feeling too complacent, or start wondering how on earth I ended up standing behind the lectern in a college of ed classroom (which is silly, 'cuz I don't actually use the lectern, but it is a good place to hang my coat), I will pick up something written by Giroux, and I will thank my lucky stars I have the however distant possibility that I might offer a student or two a flash of critical insight that ties their endeavor to teach with a desire to change the world. An From now on, anytime I start feeling too complacent, or start wondering how on earth I ended up standing behind the lectern in a college of ed classroom (which is silly, 'cuz I don't actually use the lectern, but it is a good place to hang my coat), I will pick up something written by Giroux, and I will thank my lucky stars I have the however distant possibility that I might offer a student or two a flash of critical insight that ties their endeavor to teach with a desire to change the world. And not in a '60's protest kind of way, but a way that, just by recognizing and using language to alter perceptions just enough, can shine light on what power structures would prefer stay shaded, to recognize greed and corruption despite the fancy suit it wears, to question, always, what everyone else insists is common sense.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Beer

    This is an interesting and accessible (and horrifying) account of the neoliberal assault on education. Giroux examines how market-based “reform” deprofessionalizes teachers, weakens collective bargaining, and encourages privatization. He calls for a more critical pedagogy, envisioning public education that prepares students for futures as democratic citizens rather than simply future workers.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Roberto Suarez

    I have to admit that with my optimistic and industrious ideologies I have been easily caught up in the mix of challenging the current educational system. However, after reading "Education and the Crisis of Public Values" I have come to believe there may be bigger issues and agendas at play. Why have teachers and the education system come under such attack and ridicule? What are the driving forces that have created such an exaggerated mockery of such an indispensible transformative social good? W I have to admit that with my optimistic and industrious ideologies I have been easily caught up in the mix of challenging the current educational system. However, after reading "Education and the Crisis of Public Values" I have come to believe there may be bigger issues and agendas at play. Why have teachers and the education system come under such attack and ridicule? What are the driving forces that have created such an exaggerated mockery of such an indispensible transformative social good? Why aren't all governmental positions, such as, politicians, under the same kind of attack of meeting specifications of performance pushed by the media? If private sector practices (business methods) are so great that they filter into the education system, why did the banking system, auto industry, and housing market have to be bailed out by the public sector? If we really want to focus on improving schools and ultimately shaping the future of our nation we need to focus on developing critically thinking imaginative engaged citizens and support our teachers by working toward ending poverty, crime, and disengaged citizens (e.g., uninvolved parents). More teachers, smaller class sizes, and incentives for parents getting involved into their children's education may be some of the answers. If we continue on the current track we are on we will decrease quality and increase monetary funds for other agendas, while creating a more confirmative ignorant pop culture focused society. We will cease to see future transformative, talented, and creative leaders.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Great book that provides a lot of insight into the current state of education. It's required reading for my students. Great book that provides a lot of insight into the current state of education. It's required reading for my students.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erendira

    Library VCL Acq - ordered 12/7/11 Main LA 217.2.G54 2012

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hilal

  7. 4 out of 5

    Johnathan

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katy

  9. 4 out of 5

    Molly Chlebnikow

  10. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Wood

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachael Mcloud

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lily

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jon

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Ann

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brian Streight

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brent Uzzell

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emile Bojesen

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Stoneman

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jameson Goetz

  23. 5 out of 5

    Simon

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maya

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ed

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashraf Mourad

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kaele Shields

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  29. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eleesha

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