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I'd Rather Be in Charge: A Legendary Business Leader's Roadmap for Achieving Pride, Power, and Joy at Work

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Charlotte Beers is proof that women can achieve power, pride, and joy at work—despite the odds. In the highly competitive and often cutthroat world of advertising, Charlotte became the first female ever to head two giant, multinational advertising agencies. In serving her demanding clients, she helped build many of the most important brands around the world. Today, Charlot Charlotte Beers is proof that women can achieve power, pride, and joy at work—despite the odds. In the highly competitive and often cutthroat world of advertising, Charlotte became the first female ever to head two giant, multinational advertising agencies. In serving her demanding clients, she helped build many of the most important brands around the world. Today, Charlotte rates her current title—teacher—her most satisfying, as she travels through the United States and Europe educating women on how to ignite their own strengths, in what she calls “the era of forging ahead for women.” Her pioneering experiences have been captured in I’d Rather Be in Charge, creating a blueprint for women as they face their own challenges and strive to achieve the positions of leadership and influence they deserve. Told in an intimate and honest style, I’d Rather Be in Charge is part personal history, part pragmatic guide, as Charlotte describes her own  experiences, lessons from her peers such as Martha Stewart and Suze Orman, as well as stories of her students’ transformations. By chronicling both successes and mistakes, Charlotte proves that finding your own personal style of leadership is the only way to take charge, find satisfaction, and gain confidence in the ever-evolving workplace of today.  I’d Rather Be in Charge is a breakthrough book. It is a master class for women who are ready to shatter their own glass ceilings.  


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Charlotte Beers is proof that women can achieve power, pride, and joy at work—despite the odds. In the highly competitive and often cutthroat world of advertising, Charlotte became the first female ever to head two giant, multinational advertising agencies. In serving her demanding clients, she helped build many of the most important brands around the world. Today, Charlot Charlotte Beers is proof that women can achieve power, pride, and joy at work—despite the odds. In the highly competitive and often cutthroat world of advertising, Charlotte became the first female ever to head two giant, multinational advertising agencies. In serving her demanding clients, she helped build many of the most important brands around the world. Today, Charlotte rates her current title—teacher—her most satisfying, as she travels through the United States and Europe educating women on how to ignite their own strengths, in what she calls “the era of forging ahead for women.” Her pioneering experiences have been captured in I’d Rather Be in Charge, creating a blueprint for women as they face their own challenges and strive to achieve the positions of leadership and influence they deserve. Told in an intimate and honest style, I’d Rather Be in Charge is part personal history, part pragmatic guide, as Charlotte describes her own  experiences, lessons from her peers such as Martha Stewart and Suze Orman, as well as stories of her students’ transformations. By chronicling both successes and mistakes, Charlotte proves that finding your own personal style of leadership is the only way to take charge, find satisfaction, and gain confidence in the ever-evolving workplace of today.  I’d Rather Be in Charge is a breakthrough book. It is a master class for women who are ready to shatter their own glass ceilings.  

30 review for I'd Rather Be in Charge: A Legendary Business Leader's Roadmap for Achieving Pride, Power, and Joy at Work

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robin Whitney

    The exercises in "knowing yourself" were ridiculously common-sensical but nonetheless ridiculously eye-opening. Leave it to an ad woman.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Beth Hatch

    I am almost embarrassed to admit that I read this book for fear that I might be giving the impression that I have an insatiable need for power. I just want to be a better leader and learn to be more assertive, and was looking for a book similar to Lean In by Cheryl Sandberg. There were parts of this book that I thought were very good regarding being assertive and being able to identify how others see you and changing your behavior to reflect how you want to be perceived -- modifying your self-po I am almost embarrassed to admit that I read this book for fear that I might be giving the impression that I have an insatiable need for power. I just want to be a better leader and learn to be more assertive, and was looking for a book similar to Lean In by Cheryl Sandberg. There were parts of this book that I thought were very good regarding being assertive and being able to identify how others see you and changing your behavior to reflect how you want to be perceived -- modifying your self-portrait. But I felt that the message was largely self-focused (which seems obvious given the title) and that can be detrimental to companies who have too many power players and not enough collaborators and team players. For example, she describes a situation where there is a marketing meeting going on and a man from the team is giving the presentation. He uses the word "our idea" to pitch the plan to the client. In the meeting, the woman who came up with the idea slams her binder on the table and says, "MY idea..." and proceeds to pitch the sale. I can see that taking credit is important if you did the work, but the way she bulldozed her coworker and team member shows the client that they are a dysfunctional company that does not work well together. She applauds it when women are called ballsy and bitches because the impression is one of power. Taking on work with no reward or glory seems pointless. One particularly disturbing scenario is one where a high level executive tries to drunkenly seduce her in a company apartment. Her response is to tell him to get off, run away, then later call him and say, "Don't let it happen again" and using the scenario as leverage. If that is what is needed to be in charge, I don't think I want it. I want to be assertive but without coming off as a mean. Is that even possible for a woman? I am going to keep looking for more books like Cheryl's.

  3. 4 out of 5

    JoAnn

    How a woman owns her power and displays that in the workplace has been a public dance for decades. This book brought together the need for playing the game the way it needs to be played, plus acting authentically oneself. It's a non-apologetic affirmation that it's not only okay, but perfectly correct to be recognized as the leader you were born to be. This is especially valuable for those of us old enough to have been told you must "act like a man" to be a strong female boss, and have struggled How a woman owns her power and displays that in the workplace has been a public dance for decades. This book brought together the need for playing the game the way it needs to be played, plus acting authentically oneself. It's a non-apologetic affirmation that it's not only okay, but perfectly correct to be recognized as the leader you were born to be. This is especially valuable for those of us old enough to have been told you must "act like a man" to be a strong female boss, and have struggled to find the best balance between authenticity, authority and leadership style.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    Part of my continued informal self study in leadership. Gives good evidence for the basic yet challenging point that the way you interact with others at work is in large part shaped by the messages you assimilated in your family as a child about how to behave. The author asserts that by being mindful of those messages, we can actively shape how we act and how we are perceived in the workplace. The book has some promising-sounding tips, and it's interesting to read about the author's experience r Part of my continued informal self study in leadership. Gives good evidence for the basic yet challenging point that the way you interact with others at work is in large part shaped by the messages you assimilated in your family as a child about how to behave. The author asserts that by being mindful of those messages, we can actively shape how we act and how we are perceived in the workplace. The book has some promising-sounding tips, and it's interesting to read about the author's experience rising to the top in the advertising world.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    After hearing Charlotte Beers speak at a conference, I was anxious to read her book. She is an amazing lady, very quick to think and react in the moment. I gained a lot of helpful ideas from her book, but the greatest lessons were learned from meeting with a women's group each month to discuss! Each chapter took on a whole new meaning. We all loved Charlotte's idea of creating your own portrait. This task is not easy, but it came together nicely with help from the group!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sara Gray

    I had an a moment while reading this book. I have a well defined self portrait. I know who I am and what motivates me. The concept of probing others of their view of you is interesting. Are you presenting yourself how you want to be known? How much do you know about your reputation? Bosses get false praise so do you really know how your thought of. Interesting and I will definitely put this in my toolbox.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Hurst

    I really liked this book in part because I had the chance to meet Charlotte and hear her speak, so I felt her voice in a way I might not have just from reading. The end was the best part by far, and I was able to pull out some excellent gems I'll keep referencing over time as I re-evaluate my career.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark "Lefty" Holencik

    Charlotte Beers writes her story of how she made her way to the top. She tells the story in such a way that helps empower you to reach farther. She tells how she had to look at her past to see why she did things the way she did. This gave her the insight to change the things that did not work for her.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Maser

    Working her way during the "Mad Men" era of advertising, Beers became the first female CEO of a major advertising agency. After reading this, read "Lean In" by Sandberg. Beers comes from the generation before Sandberg so I feel there is a continuity to reading these two books in that order.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Enid

    "A legendary business leader's roadmap for achieving pride, power and joy at work." I think every working woman would find something to think about here. Maybe it should be required reading for every smart, young, working woman.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Theodore Kinni

    Beers has written this memoir/leadership handbook for women, but men can take a lot away from this one, too.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karen Schoessler

    Excellent view from a woman's pointe of view. Great insight and instruction on how to be a power centered woman void of emotional baggage!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Women in marketing, Ms Beers has a lot to teach and share. Her way of establishing a future work persona is spot on.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    Not too much new information, but a good read in general. Beers was a "pioneer" of women in corporate management and now runs workshops for other women in top seats.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    This audiobook was read by the author, which might not have been the best choice. The reading came across stilted and phony. The book was okay but not what I was hoping for.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura Mcnew

    Excellent book. I heard Charlotte Beers at a conference this week. I encourage all women professionals to read it. Charlotte Beers offers great advise and insight to business.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aigerim Mukhambetova

    Inspiring!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Elsass

    Interesting tolerance about Charlotte, some interesting tips regarding how she looked at herself and growing through business

  19. 5 out of 5

    Angie Frese

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michelle M

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Durand

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wattzit

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dana Fontaine

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

  27. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gah

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cathy M Woods

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