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How did a woman holding a pistol in her right hand manage to shoot herself in the left temple? What was the link between a ghost sighting and the disappearance of top secert military plans? How did the bullet that killed Sir Gervase shatter a mirror in another part of the room? And who destroyed the "eternal triangle" of love involving renowned beauty, Valentine Chantry? He How did a woman holding a pistol in her right hand manage to shoot herself in the left temple? What was the link between a ghost sighting and the disappearance of top secert military plans? How did the bullet that killed Sir Gervase shatter a mirror in another part of the room? And who destroyed the "eternal triangle" of love involving renowned beauty, Valentine Chantry? Hercule Poirot is faced with four mystifying cases—Murder in the Mews, The Incredible Theft, Dead Man's Mirror and Triangle at Rhodes—each a miniature classic of characterisation, incident, and suspense.


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How did a woman holding a pistol in her right hand manage to shoot herself in the left temple? What was the link between a ghost sighting and the disappearance of top secert military plans? How did the bullet that killed Sir Gervase shatter a mirror in another part of the room? And who destroyed the "eternal triangle" of love involving renowned beauty, Valentine Chantry? He How did a woman holding a pistol in her right hand manage to shoot herself in the left temple? What was the link between a ghost sighting and the disappearance of top secert military plans? How did the bullet that killed Sir Gervase shatter a mirror in another part of the room? And who destroyed the "eternal triangle" of love involving renowned beauty, Valentine Chantry? Hercule Poirot is faced with four mystifying cases—Murder in the Mews, The Incredible Theft, Dead Man's Mirror and Triangle at Rhodes—each a miniature classic of characterisation, incident, and suspense.

30 review for Murder in the Mews

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Murder in the Mews (Hercule Poirot, #18) = Dead Man's Mirror, Agatha Christie Murder in the Mews and Other Stories is a short story collection written by Agatha Christie and first published in the UK by Collins Crime Club on 15 March 1937. Murder in the Mews; The Incredible Theft; Dead Man's Mirror; Triangle at Rhodes. عنوانها: جنایت در مجتمع مسکونی؛ جنایت در شب آتش بازی؛ آینه مردان مرده؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش ماه سپتامبر سال 2011 میلادی عنوان: جنایت در شب آتش بازی؛ نویسنده: آگ Murder in the Mews (Hercule Poirot, #18) = Dead Man's Mirror, Agatha Christie Murder in the Mews and Other Stories is a short story collection written by Agatha Christie and first published in the UK by Collins Crime Club on 15 March 1937. Murder in the Mews; The Incredible Theft; Dead Man's Mirror; Triangle at Rhodes. عنوانها: جنایت در مجتمع مسکونی؛ جنایت در شب آتش بازی؛ آینه مردان مرده؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش ماه سپتامبر سال 2011 میلادی عنوان: جنایت در شب آتش بازی؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: حمید بلندسران؛ تهران، هرمس، 1390، در 244 ص؛ چاپ دوم 1393؛ عنوان اصلی Dead man’s mirror عنوان: جنایت در مجتمع مسکونی؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: فرید جواهر کلام؛ تهران، پاییز، 1373، در 150 ص؛ عنوان دیگر: جنایت در مجتمع مسکونی و یک سرقت باورنکردنی؛ هرکول پوآرو از جزیره «رودز» مأیوس شده بود. او برای استراحت و گذراندن تعطیلات به آنجا آمده بود. تعطیلاتی که بخصوص به دور از هرگونه جرم و جنایتی باشد. به او گفته شده بود، که اواخر ماه اکتبر، جزیره تقریبا خالی از سکنه است، و نقطه دنج و آرامی به شمار می‌آید. البته این به نوبه ی خود درست بود. زوجهای «چانتری» و «گولد»، پاملا و سوزان، ژنرال و خودش و دو زوج دیگر ایتالیایی تنها مهمانان هتل بودند. اما در همین جمعِ محدود هم، ذهن پرکار پوآرو، این را حس می‌کرد، که رویدادهایی در پیش است. «همه‌ اش به‌ خاطر این شمّ جنایی ام است.» پوآرو این‌گونه از خودش گله کرد، و با خود گفت: «سوء هاضمه دارم! خیالاتی شده‌ ام!» اما هنوز نگران بود. یک روز صبح از اتاقش بیرون آمد و دید خانم گولد روی ایوان هتل مشغول سوزن‌ دوزی است. هنگامی که به طرفش می‌رفت، از دور احساس کرد، که زن دستمالی را در کنارش پنهان کرد. با آنکه چشمان خانم گولد خشک بودند، اما به طرز مشکوکی، شفاف به نظر می‌رسیدند. از نظر پوآرو، کمی زیادی شاد به نظر می‌رسید. شفافیت چشمهایش هم، کمی بیش از حد بود. زن گفت: ــ صبح بخیر، موسیو پوآرو. طراوت ساختگی‌ اش شک پوآرو را برانگیخت...؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

    Ok this book comprises four novellas, so its probably fair that I mark them as I read. Murder in the Mews 4.5 ⭐️ A great short story that commences on Guy Fawkes night amidst the fireworks exploding, so ideal for murder. And who did it and why ? Poirot and Japp go (metaphorically) hand in hand to solve this complex killing. The Incredible Theft 3.5⭐️ Who was the person seen skulking around the terrace ? How did they know to steal the plans in that short space of time ? Poirot interviews all the peop Ok this book comprises four novellas, so its probably fair that I mark them as I read. Murder in the Mews 4.5 ⭐️ A great short story that commences on Guy Fawkes night amidst the fireworks exploding, so ideal for murder. And who did it and why ? Poirot and Japp go (metaphorically) hand in hand to solve this complex killing. The Incredible Theft 3.5⭐️ Who was the person seen skulking around the terrace ? How did they know to steal the plans in that short space of time ? Poirot interviews all the people at the dinner that night to ascertain who could possibly have stolen the plans, and why was the femme fatale, Mrs Vanderlyn, really invited for the weekend by Lord Mayfield ? Dead Man's Mirror 4⭐️ Amazingly I read this short story last year, and yet I still couldn't remember who the murderer was. Now does that mean I am loosing my memory or hopefully that I've read so many books since, that this story has been pushed from my mind. Anyway its an enjoyable story with Poirot at his most enigmatic best as he investigates the suicide or was it murder, of the slightly batty Sir Gervase Chevenix-Gore. Writing a book about his ancestors, and surrounded by his meagre family and staff, Sir Gervase is found dead in his locked study when he doesn't turn up in time for dinner. Poirot, invited down that day, arrives amongst the confusion. Triangle at Rhodes 4⭐️ So this was, to quote a friend "a Grand story". Poirot, holidaying on a Greek Island (lucky devil) is drawn into an incident involving 2 married couples. He is concerned that something untoward is going to happen and warns one of the wives that she should leave the island. Needless to say she ignores his advice and her husband is then accused of murdering the other wife. Poirot seems to have pre-empted the murder and makes himself available to the Greek police. Truth will come out. So overall this has to be a 4 ⭐️ star read , 4 great short stories that really demonstrate Poirot's intelligence and versatility.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Evgeny

    The anthology consists of 4 novellas. Murder in the Mews. Remember, remember! The fifth of November, The Gunpowder treason and plot; I know of no reason Why the Gunpowder treason Should ever be forgot. Who could have thought that hipster Agatha Christie would use these lines before Alan Moore made them cool in V for Vendetta? I certainly was not expecting this. In any way during the celebration of Guy Fawkes night a suicide of a young woman occurred. Only there were too many suspicious circumstance The anthology consists of 4 novellas. Murder in the Mews. Remember, remember! The fifth of November, The Gunpowder treason and plot; I know of no reason Why the Gunpowder treason Should ever be forgot. Who could have thought that hipster Agatha Christie would use these lines before Alan Moore made them cool in V for Vendetta? I certainly was not expecting this. In any way during the celebration of Guy Fawkes night a suicide of a young woman occurred. Only there were too many suspicious circumstances for Inspector Japp to start murder investigation. Luckily his friend Hercule Poirot was involved in the investigation. So murder or suicide? It is up to Poirot to decide. The Incredible Theft. A strategic plans for a super-duper plane was stolen from the home of its inventor. At this time Europe was ready to start a war so everybody and their brother would have loved to build such a plane. The theft was committed in such a way that is was physically impossible to do, thus the title. One of the guests convinced the host to invite Poirot to investigate. Poirot did so. Is it just me, or the ending is quite unsatisfactory? Dead Man's Mirror. A famous eccentric millionaire made an offer to Poirot he could not refuse. He came following the invitation just in time to find a dead body of that guy. Everybody was convinced it was suicide. Everybody but Poirot that is. The longest and the most convoluted story of the book. The mirror in the murder room was the key to the mystery. I still have no clue why. Triangle at Rhodes. Poirot was taking a vacation on a Greek island thinking there would be no murders around him. To nobody's surprise he ended up right in the middle of a love triangle with all its drama, jealousy, heartbreaking, and murder. Yes, a person whose fate was obvious from the first page of the story was poisoned. This is the shortest story with setup being done during all but the last couple of pages where Poirot explained what really had happened. The story length is its biggest strength. What can I say? It is a Poirot book not titled The Big Four which means the minimal rating is 4 stars. It has great characters (Poirot himself being first and foremost), and complicated mysteries but it is not outstanding, so 4 stars it is.

  4. 5 out of 5

    carol.

    A collection that shows its age, culturally speaking. Dead Man's Mirror 3 stars "The flat was a modern one. The furnishings of the room were modern, too. The armchairs were squarely built, the upright chairs were angular. A modern writing-table was set squarely in front of the window and at it sat a small, elderly man. His head was practically the only thing in the room that was not square. It was egg-shaped." Clearly written in the days when entrance and exit wounds were not a known Thing by all re A collection that shows its age, culturally speaking. Dead Man's Mirror 3 stars "The flat was a modern one. The furnishings of the room were modern, too. The armchairs were squarely built, the upright chairs were angular. A modern writing-table was set squarely in front of the window and at it sat a small, elderly man. His head was practically the only thing in the room that was not square. It was egg-shaped." Clearly written in the days when entrance and exit wounds were not a known Thing by all readers/viewers. Nonetheless, I liked the characterizations. The classic locked-room mystery that seems to be a suicide. The Incredible Theft 2.5 stars "As the butler handed round the souffle Lord Mayfield leaned confidentially towards his neighbor on the right, Lady Julia Carrington. Known as a perfect host, Lord Mayfield took trouble to live up to his reputation. Although unmarried, he was always charming to women." I never really grooved much on Christie's attempts at spy stories. It's a strange bygone age, where people apparently take home Top Secret Plans and have Top Secret Meetings at their country estates. Still, Poirot, and it is intriguing as a period piece. Murder in the Mews 3 stars "'Penny for the guy, sir?' A small boy with a grimy face grinned ingratiatingly. 'Certainly not!' said Chief Inspector Japp. 'And, look here, my lad--' A short homily followed. The dismayed urchin beat a precipitate retreat, remarking briefly and succinctly to his youthful friends: 'Blimy if it ain't a cop all togged up!'" Christie does a nice twist. Inspector Japp and Poirot investigate an apparent suicide, discovered by the woman's roommate. More dialogue, with more feel of polish. Triangle at Rhodes 2 stars -Don't read this if you are going to read Evil Under the Sun. Hercule Poirot sat on the white sand and looked out across the sparkling blue water. He was carefully dressed in a dandified fashion in white flannels and a large panama hat protected his head. He belonged to the old-fashioned generation which believed in covering itself carefully from the sun. Miss Pamela Lyall, who sat beside him and talked ceaselessly, represented the modern school of thought in that she was wearing the barest minimum of clothing on her sun-browned person." Christie must have been working out her plot for one of her better known, full-length mysteries. This is quite truncated at a mere 25 pages and loses much of the atmosphere that makes the book so powerful. Two-and-a-half stars, rounding up, because, Christie. If I rate them lower, it's probably because I'm comparing them to my memories of her at her best. Edition note: this is the right ISBN number, wrong cover. It's a 1984 reprint by Berkeley Books and features a sihlouette of Poirot on the front.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    That odd, little foreigner with the strange mustache Hercule Poirot is at it again! In Murder in the Mews, a collection of shorts, Poirot's razor-sharp mind is pitted against such stumpers as a suicide/murder conundrum, a deadly love triangle, and a case of important papers gone missing. Originally four short stories were published under this title, which was called Dead Man's Mirror here in the States. My version only included three stories: Murder in the Mews, Triangle at Rhodes, and The Incre That odd, little foreigner with the strange mustache Hercule Poirot is at it again! In Murder in the Mews, a collection of shorts, Poirot's razor-sharp mind is pitted against such stumpers as a suicide/murder conundrum, a deadly love triangle, and a case of important papers gone missing. Originally four short stories were published under this title, which was called Dead Man's Mirror here in the States. My version only included three stories: Murder in the Mews, Triangle at Rhodes, and The Incredible Theft. The title story is the most intriguing and most well developed. The remaining two were quite enjoyable, if a bit quick and just a tad perfunctory…just a tad, mind you. Poirot, that charming if arrogant sleuth, is clever as ever in unearthing the truth, an absolute pleasure to observe in action. Christie's plotting was relatively tight with an occasionally smart twist or two. Her characters are serviceable as always, though few really stood out as some have in her other stories. All in all, if you're already an Agatha Christie fan, you won't go wrong with Murder in the Mews.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Singh

    What makes this collection a good read are the two stories. The first Incredible theft is expanded version of Christie's original story- The Submarine plans. The second story Dead Man's mirror is expanded version of her earlier story- The second Gong. The other two stories in the collection include Murder in the Mews and Triangle at Rhodes. We also get to know that Poirot loves his Sirop de cassis !!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    samantha (books-are-my-life20)

    I love the adventures of Poirot. He is the best character of Agatha Christie. This was a wonderful story. I couldn't put the book down. Loved it and highly recommend it, personally finished it in two hours.

  8. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    Who am I kidding in writing this review? None (or one?) of my Goodreads friends is going to read this book. 440,000 reviewed And Then There Were None. More than 100K people or more have reviewed Christie’s each most popular Poirot works such as The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Murder on the Orient Express or Death on the Nile. Murder on the Mews is one of the Little Engines that Could of Christie-lore, reviewed by as few as 8,000. It features four stories, three that might qualify as novellas, publi Who am I kidding in writing this review? None (or one?) of my Goodreads friends is going to read this book. 440,000 reviewed And Then There Were None. More than 100K people or more have reviewed Christie’s each most popular Poirot works such as The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Murder on the Orient Express or Death on the Nile. Murder on the Mews is one of the Little Engines that Could of Christie-lore, reviewed by as few as 8,000. It features four stories, three that might qualify as novellas, published in 1937, maybe perfect length for tv serialization, but nothing much to write home about, having been there. One thing to observe about Christie generally is that she makes scant reference to a real world outside of her fictions. In general, she occasionally admits that The Great Depression may have affected her characters. In “Murder in the Mews,” we open on Guy Fawkes Day with some kids begging “Penny for the guy, sir?” but Chief Inspector Japp brushes him off and there are maybe only a couple other references thereafter about he fact that the need for money might be a motive for the crime. Poirot himself is a little egg-headed dandy; he loves pretty girls and royals. He’s generally respectful to all classes in his investigations, but he and his author don’t much apologize for being pretty escapist, even elitist. In “The Incredible Theft”—which is not all that incredible, Agatha, come on—we have our first mention that England may have to face the challenge of involvement in WW II. “Murder in the Mews”: The best and most developed story is the title story. Is it a murder disguised as a suicide, or a suicide disguised as a murder? That’s the unique angle here. 4 stars. “The Incredible Theft”: See above, but it’s about a theft (!?) and no one even dies? What’s the good of reading about that, Agatha? At least kill somebody! Though the theft involves plans for a bomber—a war reference—and a (pretty) American former (?) spy, no one would care much about this theft.Not enough development. 2 stars. “Dead Man’s Mirror”: Features rich and somewhat eccentric Lord Chevenix-Gore, who for some reason seems to have committed suicide, in spite of his massive ego. Who would even buy this premise, and yet most seem to accept it for most of the story. So, yeah, he was murdered, and as Gore gets gored (okay, by a bullet, sorry), the mirror in an adjoining room gets shattered. How can this even happen?! Why should we care? This one is a little notable because it rehearses an idea for getting away with murder that appears in a later book, The Mirror Crack'd. It's a solid story. 3 stars. “The Triangle at Rhodes”: is mercifully short, the weakest of the four, not included in some editions, involving a love triangle, though you think it is about one set of characters, and. . . that’s the interest in this one, that the triangle you thought was key is not as important as another. Beach scenes! 2 stars, but the summer scene at Rhodes could have been developed more. These are pretty early and weaker stories from Christie and yet they are still readable, I kept reading, they are pretty well constructed. I read them fast and yet they are good to see her working out some different ideas. If you want to read on Christie, though, this would not even be close to the one I would recommend.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Janete

    This was the first Agatha Christie's short histories book I've read and I did not like it very much. It's interesting for passing the time, but I prefer the novels with Hercule Poirot than these short stories. I read in my native language and I consider that this book deserves 3.5 stars.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Beckham

    Anticipating a cozy full-length novel, my first reaction was mild dismay – to discover that Murder in the Mews comprises four quick-fire short stories, the first of which provides the eponymous cover title. However, my disappointment was short-lived – for potted Christie loses little in the telling – and in fact these are arguably novellas, ranging from 10,000 to 30,000 words: - Murder in the Mews - The Incredible Theft - Dead Man’s Mirror - Triangle at Rhodes The first three are variations on the ‘cl Anticipating a cozy full-length novel, my first reaction was mild dismay – to discover that Murder in the Mews comprises four quick-fire short stories, the first of which provides the eponymous cover title. However, my disappointment was short-lived – for potted Christie loses little in the telling – and in fact these are arguably novellas, ranging from 10,000 to 30,000 words: - Murder in the Mews - The Incredible Theft - Dead Man’s Mirror - Triangle at Rhodes The first three are variations on the ‘closed room’ mystery – and you can imagine Agatha Christie experimenting with these, perfecting her (and Poirot’s) technique. The fourth is the classic ménage-a-trois (ou quatre, ou cinq, ou six!) – and it surely was the precursor to Evil Under the Sun – her diabolical English seaside mystery, published in 1941. The plots themselves, though necessarily abridged, are as devious as ever – and even the denouement of Dead Man’s Mirror, when I thought, “Well, that was obvious” – a final twist arrived to kick me in the pants! (Excuse the mixed metaphor.) An added bonus, as usual – and I never tire of this – a nostalgic insight into the lives and mores of the English upper-middle-classes – set around the mid-1930s. Very enjoyable. I shall read again in another 10 years.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    "Murder in the Mews" was the last book Agatha Christie published in 1937 and consists of four Poirot short stories - although all are quite long by her usual standard, and one really novella length. All feature Poirot, one features his old friend Inspector Japp and another has a guest appearance by Mr Satterthwaite, of the Harley Quin stories and "Three Act Tragedy". The first title story, "Murder in the Mews" and the third story, "Dead Man's Mirror", both feature a suicide, later suspected of be "Murder in the Mews" was the last book Agatha Christie published in 1937 and consists of four Poirot short stories - although all are quite long by her usual standard, and one really novella length. All feature Poirot, one features his old friend Inspector Japp and another has a guest appearance by Mr Satterthwaite, of the Harley Quin stories and "Three Act Tragedy". The first title story, "Murder in the Mews" and the third story, "Dead Man's Mirror", both feature a suicide, later suspected of being murder. One story is set in a small house, in a street peopled with those who service the aristocracy (there are, for example, a large amount of chauffeurs living nearby). "Dead Man's Mirror" sees Poirot summoned to a country house by a wealthy man obsessed by his family name, but both cleverly weave the plot around ties of family and the past. The second story, "The Incredible Theft" involves espionage and important documents stolen from a study during a weekend party. Lastly, there is the enjoyable "Triangle at Rhodes", with Poirot on holiday. Christie always wrote excellent stories in exotic locations and this is no exception. For me, it is the best story in the collection, with an actress (often a baddie in Christie novels!) causing jealousy and marital discord on the beach. These are a nice collection of stories, with Poirot cleverly solving each case in his own special way. Out of interest, for a man who distained the methods of Sherlock Holmes, you will find that he is actually inspecting footprints in "Dead Man's Mirror", the first time I can remember him doing so. Overall, a fun collection with the author, and her detective, at their best.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Strömquist

    Really liked the first 3 novellas in this book, good mysteries and Poirot in good form. A bit too far fetched red herrings here and there, but nothing that distracts too much. The last, ‘Triangle at Rhodes’ could have been left in the magazine where it featured, short, matter-of-factly told and with a bit out of character Belgian detective.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sabrin Ahmed

    3.75 stars. Agatha Christie yet again lives up to her title of'the Queen Of Crime'.Murder in the Mews is a collection of four mystifying and mind boggling cases taken up by professional sleuth and well-known Hercule Poirot. I honestly went into this one with a 100 percent guarantee of awesomeness. This being the tenth Agatha Christie novel and 8th Poirot I've read so far,you can imagine that by now I've completely given up on guessing who the culprit is,(sort of).As there are four different cases 3.75 stars. Agatha Christie yet again lives up to her title of'the Queen Of Crime'.Murder in the Mews is a collection of four mystifying and mind boggling cases taken up by professional sleuth and well-known Hercule Poirot. I honestly went into this one with a 100 percent guarantee of awesomeness. This being the tenth Agatha Christie novel and 8th Poirot I've read so far,you can imagine that by now I've completely given up on guessing who the culprit is,(sort of).As there are four different cases I am pretty ambivalent and indecisive concerning my potential ratings for this particular book.So,here goes..... No Spoilers included. First story:Murder in the Mews. Christie starts of on a high; probably a 4.75 considering she's the author of 'And Then There Were None'. This first story is set on the eve of Guy Fawkes Day with Poirot wondering aloud with another police officer whether a murderer would take advantage of the loud blasts emitted by the fireworks and use them as a cover.As expected,a murder does occur.A woman living in the Mews is found shot through the left temple with the pistol in her right hand.At first it is put forward as a perplexing case of murder but as usual,you're wrong.Having to make do with a missing piece of blotting paper,a strange housemate and a disappearing attaché-case as the only clues available,Poirot exposes hidden facts and produces a satisfying and unheard-of conclusion with a clever twist. Second story:The Incredible Theft. Not as incredible as awaited from Agatha but good enough.A rising politician and millionaire hosts a house party with numerous and suspicious guests.Top secret army aircraft plans mysteriously go missing and Poirot is called upon to save the case.No one,not even the complainant is above suspicion and scrutinisation. What's the catch you ask?The missing plans are not so far.In fact they're so close it's unbelievable. Third story:Dead man's mirror.The egomaniac,staunch and wealthy Sir. Gervase Chevenix-Gore summons famous detective Poirot for ambiguous reasons.Upon Poirot's arrival,host and never-late Gervase is found in his study shot through the head,slouching in an uncomfortable position with a letter scrawled, 'SORRY' on the desk before him. Poirot must solve the case of the dead man's death with the possibility of suicide ruled out at first sight. Family ties are recovered and secrets unveiled in this pleasant tale of family sacrifice and wickedness. Fourth story:Triangle at Rhodes. Beautiful Valentine Chantry along with her new sour-faced husband go to the holiday island of Rhodes where they encounter Poirot, a few others as well as handsome Douglas Gold and his meek wife,Marjorie. Valentine swoons under the attention of Douglas Gold and rumours spread about a love triangle involving Valentine and the two men. However, Poirot,as expected,sees past the mundane and beyond to the true nature of the supposed triangle.Warnings are not heeded and results in the murder of one of the holidaymakers.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susan in NC

    Really enjoyed this short story collection, especially the last, Triangle at Rhodes. All four stories featured Hercule Poirot, and typical of Christie the mysteries were satisfying- but this last one, which I’ve seen dramatized with David Suchet as the brilliant Belgian detective, was particularly satisfying. It kicks right off with the meticulously dressed Poirot sitting among female sunbathers on holiday at Rhodes, listening as his chattering companions pick apart their fellow guests, includin Really enjoyed this short story collection, especially the last, Triangle at Rhodes. All four stories featured Hercule Poirot, and typical of Christie the mysteries were satisfying- but this last one, which I’ve seen dramatized with David Suchet as the brilliant Belgian detective, was particularly satisfying. It kicks right off with the meticulously dressed Poirot sitting among female sunbathers on holiday at Rhodes, listening as his chattering companions pick apart their fellow guests, including the glamorous Valentine Chantry, five times married, with her hunky latest in tow as she appears to be trolling for her next catch among the holiday makers. Of course, Poirot senses (rightly, of course), that such marital tensions can lead to trouble, even murder - and we readers are not disappointed! As usual, Poirot won’t rest until justice is served, and he always has a few surprises up his sleeve... Very enjoyable collection, the stories are: Murder in the Mews, The Incredible Theft, Dead Man’s Mirror, and Triangle at Rhodes.

  15. 4 out of 5

    D.G.

    It's taken me a while to get back to my Poirot series audio re-read but I'm finally back in business. However, this one is not a re-read per se, as I haven't read this particular set of short stories before. When you read a long series out of order like I did with Poirot, you miss a book now and then. Murder in the Mews is actually the first of 4 short stories in this book. The narrator, Mr. Hawthorne was simply awful - his voice for Poirot was so affected. That fact may have colored my perceptio It's taken me a while to get back to my Poirot series audio re-read but I'm finally back in business. However, this one is not a re-read per se, as I haven't read this particular set of short stories before. When you read a long series out of order like I did with Poirot, you miss a book now and then. Murder in the Mews is actually the first of 4 short stories in this book. The narrator, Mr. Hawthorne was simply awful - his voice for Poirot was so affected. That fact may have colored my perception of the story. I figured out soon enough the twist. The following 3 stories: The Incredible Theft, Dead Man's Mirror and Triangle at Rhodes, were narrated by Hugh Fraser (Mr. Hastings in the Poirot series) and he's simply masterful. The last two were my favorites, as the murders were a bit more complex - I had no clue who was the murderer in the third story and I wished I would have "met" the victim when he was still alive. He was the most interesting character in the story and seemed totally nuts by the way people describe him. The denouement of the last story was less of a surprise because it reminded me of Death on the Nile, which Mrs. Christie wrote in the same year. One of the great things about re-reading the series in order is that you can see when she gets a kernel of an idea that she develops into a full-fledged book. One of the characters in Dead Man's Mirror, mentions the same line by Tennyson which Mrs. Christie revisits in The Mirror Crack'd from Side to Side. At the end, this book was a good read for those of us crazy Agatha Christie fans but I wouldn't recommend it to a newbie. There are like 30 other better choices for an introduction to Christie.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jammin Jenny

    I really enjoyed this collection of short stories featuring the famous detective Hercule Poirot. He solves all the mysteries by using his little gray cells. I think my favorite story was Triangle at Rhodes featuring a love triangle - love those love triangles!! Classic Agatha Christie.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Leigh

    A interesting selection of short stories that had Agatha Christie class and style showing. 3.75 Stars!

  18. 4 out of 5

    OonaReads

    3.5 stars

  19. 4 out of 5

    Niki (nikilovestoread)

    Murder in the Mews consists of four short stories by Agatha Christie. It was a fine collection, but lacked any of the really spectacular short stories that I know Christie was capable of. Four solid, good stories, but nothing exceptional.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    An enjoyable collection of 4 short stories. I found Dead Man’s Mirror to be the pick of the collection. Murder in the Mews and The Triangle at Rhodes were good. The Incredible Theft being the weakest.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca (areadersrambles)

    The audiobook I listened to only consisted of the first of the four shortstories (Murder in the Mews) which was really cleverly done!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kavita

    This is not a full-length novel, but more a collection of four novellas. I always mixed it up with Murder on the Links for some reason. Murder in the Mews - The title story, Murder in the Mews is also my favourite. A woman gets murdered in her home and the main suspect is her fiancé. Poirot teams up with Japp and keeps an eye on the roommate and gets to the really unique solution. I really enjoyed the atmospheric narrative and the final twist. A great little story. - 5 stars The Incredible Theft This is not a full-length novel, but more a collection of four novellas. I always mixed it up with Murder on the Links for some reason. Murder in the Mews - The title story, Murder in the Mews is also my favourite. A woman gets murdered in her home and the main suspect is her fiancé. Poirot teams up with Japp and keeps an eye on the roommate and gets to the really unique solution. I really enjoyed the atmospheric narrative and the final twist. A great little story. - 5 stars The Incredible Theft - A number of guests meet at a house party and some important political documents get stolen. There is no murder and I have no interest in the recovery of some vague military plans. Who cares which side wins? The idea that some people know what's good for a country and should get away with shit is simply disgusting too! - 1 star. Dead Man’s Mirror - Another house party, but the host commits 'suicide' in this one. Of course, it turns out to be murder. Everyone is a suspect. Who dun it? Only our Poirot can find out, and he dredges up some interesting facts from the past to piece together the clues. I liked this one but the characters didn't speak to me. - 3 stars. The Triangle at Rhodes - Poirot is on holiday, but murderers just won't leave the poor chap alone! A beautiful woman is poisoned and it is up to him to unravel the love tangles and pick out the murderer. I enjoyed the climax. It was interesting to see the dynamic of a love triangle through Poirot's eyes. - 4 stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    From TIA: A young woman is found dead in her flat, the day after Guy Fawkes night. But did she die by her own hand or someone else's? Inspector Japp calls for the assistance of Belgian sleuth, Hercule Poirot. This 1955 broadcast was long thought lost, but a tape was rediscovered in the BBC archive in 2015. Dramatised by Anthony Aspinall from a short-story first published in Woman's Journal in 1936, which later appeared in a book collection in 1937. Stars Richard Williams as Hercule Poirot, Ian Whitt From TIA: A young woman is found dead in her flat, the day after Guy Fawkes night. But did she die by her own hand or someone else's? Inspector Japp calls for the assistance of Belgian sleuth, Hercule Poirot. This 1955 broadcast was long thought lost, but a tape was rediscovered in the BBC archive in 2015. Dramatised by Anthony Aspinall from a short-story first published in Woman's Journal in 1936, which later appeared in a book collection in 1937. Stars Richard Williams as Hercule Poirot, Ian Whittaker as Freddie Hogg, Jack Melford as Chief Inspector Japp, Ronald Sidney as Detective-Sergeant Jameson, Duncan McLntyre as Doctor Brett, Monica Grey as Jane Plenderleith and Ella Milne as Mrs Hogg. Produced by David H Godfrey https://archive.org/details/MurderInT...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Caidyn (NO LONGER ACTIVE; he/him/his)

    3.5/5 Overall, a good collection! I like how it's three stories but there were actually four in here. I really enjoyed the first and last ones, tbh. The middle two blended together for me. Still good mysteries and I didn't outright hate any, but just wanted a bit more oomph!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Franci

    What a marvelous mystery!!! I couldn't figure it out until the very end!!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten McKenzie

    Classic Agatha Christie. No waffle, no padding. Action and an abundance of red herrings, with an exceptional twist at the end. No guessing, but complete satisfaction. And her characters! As always, her characters are done to perfection - just enough description, with their dialogue completing the picture. Four short stories, but so well told, they may as well be complete novels.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    Hercule Poirot, book #16 is a collection of four cases - Murder In The Mews, The Incredible Theft, Dead Man's Mirror and Triangle In Rhodes. Although technically short stories, they are essentially short cases, with Triangle In Rhodes being a very simple, but very clever novella in my opinion. Just 5 out of 12 overall though. Hercule Poirot, book #16 is a collection of four cases - Murder In The Mews, The Incredible Theft, Dead Man's Mirror and Triangle In Rhodes. Although technically short stories, they are essentially short cases, with Triangle In Rhodes being a very simple, but very clever novella in my opinion. Just 5 out of 12 overall though.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tgordon

    Agatha’s detective is always so smart and seems to see it all a catch it all. How brilliant she must have been to write these mysteries!

  29. 4 out of 5

    C.G.

    A reread for me, but in this combination of several short murder mysteries, you don't have time to get bored with one before Hercule Poirot has solved it and moved on to the next.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    4 stories. I gave a 4 to the collection as a whole. Murder in the Mews—excellent story. An apparent suicide that wasn’t. I don’t want to say more because it would spoil the fun. 4.5 stars. The Incredible Theft—very minor story. Christie wrote some good spy/espionage stories (eg. They Came to Baghdad) but this is not one of them. 2 stars. Dead Man's Mirror—Another apparent suicide. It is a challenge for a mystery writer to make a stab at a convincing “impossible crime/locked door” mystery: where th 4 stories. I gave a 4 to the collection as a whole. Murder in the Mews—excellent story. An apparent suicide that wasn’t. I don’t want to say more because it would spoil the fun. 4.5 stars. The Incredible Theft—very minor story. Christie wrote some good spy/espionage stories (eg. They Came to Baghdad) but this is not one of them. 2 stars. Dead Man's Mirror—Another apparent suicide. It is a challenge for a mystery writer to make a stab at a convincing “impossible crime/locked door” mystery: where the victim is found dead (shot or stabbed usually) in a room locked from the inside. Christie, however, has done it multiple times. One commentator lists 12 examples—4 Miss Marple stories, one Harley Quinn and the rest are Poirot, like this one. Very well done. The longest and best of the collection. 5 stars. Triangle at Rhodes—reminded me too much of Evil Under the Sun. 3 stars.

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