counter create hit Strange and Obscure Stories of the Civil War - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Strange and Obscure Stories of the Civil War

Availability: Ready to download

Strange and Obscure Stories of the Civil War is an entertaining look at the Civil War stories that don’t get told, and the misadventures you haven’t read about in history books. Share in all the humorous and strange events that took place behind the scenes of some of the most famous Civil War moments. Picture a pedestal in a public park with no statue on top; Rowland’s boo Strange and Obscure Stories of the Civil War is an entertaining look at the Civil War stories that don’t get told, and the misadventures you haven’t read about in history books. Share in all the humorous and strange events that took place behind the scenes of some of the most famous Civil War moments. Picture a pedestal in a public park with no statue on top; Rowland’s book explains that when the members of the New York Monument Commission went to hire a sculptor to finish the statue, they were shocked to discover that there was no money left in the agency’s accounts to pay for the project. The money for the statue of Dan Sickles had been stolen—stolen by former monument committee chairman Dan Sickles! Brig. Gen. Philip Kearny was the son of a New York tycoon who had helped found the New York Stock Exchange, and who groomed his boy to be a force on Wall Street. The younger Kearny decided his call was to be a force on the field of battle, so despite a law degree and an inheritance of better than $1 million, he joined the U.S. Army and studied cavalry tactics in France. His dashing figure in the saddle earned him the name of Kearny the Magnificent, probably because Kearny rode with a pistol in one hand and a sword in the other while holding the horse’s reins in his teeth. This habit proved useful after he lost his left arm in the Mexican War, because he was able to continue to wave his sword with all the menace to which he was accustomed while still guiding his horse.


Compare
Ads Banner

Strange and Obscure Stories of the Civil War is an entertaining look at the Civil War stories that don’t get told, and the misadventures you haven’t read about in history books. Share in all the humorous and strange events that took place behind the scenes of some of the most famous Civil War moments. Picture a pedestal in a public park with no statue on top; Rowland’s boo Strange and Obscure Stories of the Civil War is an entertaining look at the Civil War stories that don’t get told, and the misadventures you haven’t read about in history books. Share in all the humorous and strange events that took place behind the scenes of some of the most famous Civil War moments. Picture a pedestal in a public park with no statue on top; Rowland’s book explains that when the members of the New York Monument Commission went to hire a sculptor to finish the statue, they were shocked to discover that there was no money left in the agency’s accounts to pay for the project. The money for the statue of Dan Sickles had been stolen—stolen by former monument committee chairman Dan Sickles! Brig. Gen. Philip Kearny was the son of a New York tycoon who had helped found the New York Stock Exchange, and who groomed his boy to be a force on Wall Street. The younger Kearny decided his call was to be a force on the field of battle, so despite a law degree and an inheritance of better than $1 million, he joined the U.S. Army and studied cavalry tactics in France. His dashing figure in the saddle earned him the name of Kearny the Magnificent, probably because Kearny rode with a pistol in one hand and a sword in the other while holding the horse’s reins in his teeth. This habit proved useful after he lost his left arm in the Mexican War, because he was able to continue to wave his sword with all the menace to which he was accustomed while still guiding his horse.

30 review for Strange and Obscure Stories of the Civil War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    This is a short book about little known Civil War incidences. Rowland looked for strange or humorous stories to report on. For example, members of the New York Monument Commission went to hire a sculptor to finish the Statues of Dan Stickle. They discovered the monies had been stolen. You will get a hoot when you discover who was the thief. I found the information about the horses interesting; such as over one million horses died in the Civil War, the life expectancy of the horse was four to six This is a short book about little known Civil War incidences. Rowland looked for strange or humorous stories to report on. For example, members of the New York Monument Commission went to hire a sculptor to finish the Statues of Dan Stickle. They discovered the monies had been stolen. You will get a hoot when you discover who was the thief. I found the information about the horses interesting; such as over one million horses died in the Civil War, the life expectancy of the horse was four to six month during the War. I also thought that Rowland’s comment about the South having mostly Calvary horses and the North draft and utility horses to pull wagons and cannons interesting. Rowland claims that this reflected the industrialized North and the agrarian South. Rowland claimed that many of the northern men were poor equestrian riders but were expert at handling teams of horses and in the South, it was reversed. Most of the stories are about individual real people that helps to provide a more personal touch to the War. The book is well written and researched. It is easy to read and full of facts. The author claims it is not a trivia fact book but I used it as such. This is a great book for Civil War history buffs or those hunting for a source book of little known trivia facts. The book is short at about five hours. Fred Sanders does a good job narrating the book. Sanders is a stage and film actor and award winning audiobook narrator.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Teressa

    This is a great introduction into the Civil War. This author not only tells of some of the more unusual aspects of the war, but he never lets the reader lose sight of the fact that real men and women lived, died, and survived this incredible ordeal.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ronald Keeler

    Tim Rowland has presented a collection of tales, Strange and Obscure Stories of the Civil War. Sixteen chapters are filled with many elements of history mostly skipped in high school textbooks. No trigger warnings are necessary but there would probably be objections if young minds were exposed to the prevalence of venereal disease, tales of ridiculous situations that came about due to being under the influence of alcohol, and a detailed history of a prominent political figure, Maj. Gen Sickles, Tim Rowland has presented a collection of tales, Strange and Obscure Stories of the Civil War. Sixteen chapters are filled with many elements of history mostly skipped in high school textbooks. No trigger warnings are necessary but there would probably be objections if young minds were exposed to the prevalence of venereal disease, tales of ridiculous situations that came about due to being under the influence of alcohol, and a detailed history of a prominent political figure, Maj. Gen Sickles, who lived with a family where he bedded the matriarch while he was waiting for an infant to grow up so he could marry her. OK, maybe the last one is not so shocking. And although Gen. Sickles did not shoot someone in Times Square and get away with it, Sickles did murder the son of Francis Scott Key. And got away with it. Of course, the incidents were carefully chosen by Rowland. The amount of literature about this period is overwhelming. The author is careful to report that some of the stories are impossible to prove but that the stories were accepted at the time and there were consequences that came from a belief in their veracity. Think of the butterfly effect. Something might not be proven, but if I believe it and take actions based on my belief, and … While Rowland reports certain accounts as not completely based on sources, the author provides eighteen pages of a Selected Bibliography which contains, books, newspapers, magazines, and websites. I like Civil War history. I read books and listen to audiobooks related to the conflict. This book will send me back to the library for further information on some of the surprising and sometimes shocking information I read. One example is the case of Sarah Emma Edmonds, a woman who enlisted in the Union Army as a man. She would later write a book Nurse and Spy in the Union Army (Kindle location 633). As a man Sarah (or maybe Emma) dressed as a male and served as an attendant in hospitals. One of the things that surprised me: Rowland reports that from 500-1000 women served in this form of false identity. One of the things that shocked me: When Sarah was working as a spy, she impersonated a woman as she tried to hang around confederate camps as a camp worker. What kind of woman would be permitted to linger in a Confederate camp? Perhaps a Black Woman. That is what happened. But Sarah Emma Edmonds was White. Chapter Four is primarily about the strange and twisty (not twisted) story of Sarah, but author Rowland goes on to relate anecdotes of other women who carried out similar deceptions. Rowland uses humor and wit as he tells his stories. I found it hard to detect when he was trying to use wit because some of his descriptions are inherently funny. In other words, you can’t make this stuff up. In Chapter Sixteen we have the story of Maj. Gen. Joshua Chamberlain. This last chapter of the collection had lots of surprises for me and I guess if there is any place in the collection where I might report a spoiler, this would be it. I won’t report a spoiler but I want to quote a description Rowland provides for Chamberlain. For me, it was almost laughing-out-loud humor. “With Chamberlain, appearances were always deceiving. He sported one of those classic Civil War moustaches that look as if a bat hit him in the face at high speed. His eyebrows hunkered down over a piercing gaze that could be disarming, yet slightly hard to take seriously due to the unfortunate outgrowth on his upper lip.” (Kindle location 2262). I think it was the bat that did it. I found this chapter to be one of the most moving. It was new information for me and has several surprises. And there are many more surprising pieces of information. Think of the number of horses that were used in the Civil War. How much food does each horse eat per day? Maybe you are not interested in that but from a logistics perspective, this is interesting. It is not just putting people in a group, pointing them in the direction of gunfire, and saying, “Let’s Go!” According to this collection of stories, that is how some of the earlier actions seem to have been managed. There are some problems with typos and missing words. I’ll give them a pass due to the fog of war (just had to say that). The errors are not excessive, but they do keep me from giving the novel five Amazon stars. Maybe 4.8. And I won’t round up. This was a page-turner for me, and I don’t like to slow down to fill in missing words. It slows down the terrific pace of this novel. This sells for USD 1.99 on Amazon or is free through Kindle Unlimited.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Edwin Lowe

    Exceptional, A Unique American Civil War History, FIVE Stars 🌟 Book Review Written August 1, 2019 Strange and obscure stories of the Civil War / Tim Rowland. Kindle Edition (224 Pages) Do not read this book if you are looking for a typical history of the American Civil War, with accounts of strategies, battles, troop movements, and similar stuff. Do read this book if you are looking for an original, informative, entertaining history of the American Civil War with accounts of what it was like for th Exceptional, A Unique American Civil War History, FIVE Stars 🌟 Book Review Written August 1, 2019 Strange and obscure stories of the Civil War / Tim Rowland. Kindle Edition (224 Pages) Do not read this book if you are looking for a typical history of the American Civil War, with accounts of strategies, battles, troop movements, and similar stuff. Do read this book if you are looking for an original, informative, entertaining history of the American Civil War with accounts of what it was like for the people involved as they struggled, day to day, some for four long years, to cope and do their best while engaged in the terrible calamity of war. This book seeks to tell the story of the Civil War in a way that is easy to understand today—especially if we believe that truth is at times, stranger than fiction and that often it is the story behind the story that ultimately defines the truth. The narrative consists of sixteen eclectic vignettes, some better known than others, that are designed to broaden and expand upon, not what is known about the war, but rather what we think about the war. Within the pages of this book you will discover that it was a war filled with strange occurrences and some very funny moments; with men and women caught in impossibly tight spots; with startling coincidences; with moments both terribly bitter and unexpectedly sweet; and with history altered by the path of a bullet. There are some many great stories here that its hard to determine my favorite, but the story of Major General Dan Sickles almost caused the defeat of the Union Army at Gettysburg is among the best. The following small excerpt provides an excellent example of Rowland's prose and style "To some, Union Maj. Gen. Daniel Sickles almost lost the Battle of Gettysburg single-handedly, and as such all but cost the North the Civil War. Any true fan of Dan Sickles, however, is liable to shrug apathetically at this event, it being, all told, only about the fifth or sixth most interesting thing to happen to the man during the course of his eventful life. Number one on the list? Hard to say. Maybe it was when he murdered the son of Francis Scott Key. Might have been the time he introduced a whore to English royalty. Could have been his tryst with the beefy but insatiable ex-queen Isabella II, or the fact that he allowed himself to be bilked out of so much of the money he had stolen. He spent some time at Tammany Hall, but the inmates of that particular asylum appeared to be too honest for him. So he moved on to Congress and immediately drank it under the table." Tim Rowland, "Strange and obscure stories of the Civil War" But do not base your decision to read or not read this wonderful, entertaining book based on Dan Sicles because there are fifteen other great stories to discover. Combining exceptional prose, great research, and a true sensitivity to the human condition this book describes the nature of the American Civil War better than any other book I have read. It delivers an interesting, straight forward account that is enjoyable, often laugh out loud fun to read and easy to comprehend. The narrative is engaging and augmented throughout by contemporary accounts that are informative and interesting.This is a great "Five Star' read that I throughly enjoyed. I recommend it whole heartedly to any reader interested gaining a definitive knowledge regarding the nature of the Civil War. "

  5. 4 out of 5

    Martin Chuck

    "What had caused excitement in the beginning now simply made men numb. Everyone was ready for the end." When I first read the title, I was captivated with the thought of rumors, tales, and conspiracies that surrounded the American Civil War. Halfway through the book, I realized I really knew nothing about their history. Tim Rowland's Strange and Obscure Stories of the Civil War stated a precaution that his novel did not contain full content of the civil war. I wish I listened for I was mudding co "What had caused excitement in the beginning now simply made men numb. Everyone was ready for the end." When I first read the title, I was captivated with the thought of rumors, tales, and conspiracies that surrounded the American Civil War. Halfway through the book, I realized I really knew nothing about their history. Tim Rowland's Strange and Obscure Stories of the Civil War stated a precaution that his novel did not contain full content of the civil war. I wish I listened for I was mudding context clues and Wikipedia searches while reading the whole book. Nevertheless, I have to admit that I learned a lot about America and war tactics and how social revolution and context really plays a role in history. From what men did on their spare time during the war up to what made men join the war in the first place, these stories really were obscure. I'd never thought I'd read a humanitarian, funny, and wiity way of talking about war. As a non-American, the civil war was often a sensitive topic and the novel loosens the belt a bit. It went objective and informative on lateral facts than most civil war stories. Although that I wish I could confirm, because my lack of U.S.A. history and geography was a liability towards the end. The book was more about the Americans (specifically Southern) and less about what movies and tv shows tell you. There was barely any talk about slavery which I hoped for. But it was mentioned once. And it was probably the most important statement in the novel. I wish I could share what it was but the novel chapters act like a different story every time. So I guess it would be best to dive in yourself to find out. Politics is a dirty game. We have a lot to learn about our society by studying how our ancestors and ancestors of other people lived it. Tim Rowland is certainly knowledgeable about the history of his country. He made no inflammatory qualms about what happened and the novel only contains obscure stories that most Americans might what to know. And we're okay with that. But if you're looking for social commentary or social justice or a VIP ticket to the Civil War era. You might want to read something else first.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    This book covers a good bit of information. It starts off with John Brown and what he did. Abner Doubleday (who did not invent baseball, actually) is next. He did invent the San Francisco cable car system, though, and was at Fort Sumter when it was attacked. One strange and upsetting thing is what happened to some Maryland legislators who wanted Maryland to join the South. They were arrested and kept out of the decison-making process. The man who ordered their arrests (which were basically illega This book covers a good bit of information. It starts off with John Brown and what he did. Abner Doubleday (who did not invent baseball, actually) is next. He did invent the San Francisco cable car system, though, and was at Fort Sumter when it was attacked. One strange and upsetting thing is what happened to some Maryland legislators who wanted Maryland to join the South. They were arrested and kept out of the decison-making process. The man who ordered their arrests (which were basically illegal)? Abraham Lincoln. Other topics included how economics affected the South and its fight; the Great Locomotive Chase (which ended up a Disney movie); immigrants in the military; horses; Dan Sickles and his screwing up Gettysburg for the Union; how many died on each side and Joshua Chamberlain who ordered the rather desperate bayonet charge at Gettysburg (and which is one heck of a scene in the Gettysburg movie.) There are other topics discussed, of course. It proved to be a very interesting book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    cobin

    Read this book! Superb book for beach or book club. As America enters yet another election cycle of name calling and outright lies, this book presents a horrible war in an unforgettable series of exhaustively researched stories. The author shows an almost poetic turn of phrase as in this quote, "the Monitor and the Merrimack, the two ironclads that pinged and doinked each other to a draw", page 174. However, I was left wondering about the reference to a weigh station on the Underground Railroad, Read this book! Superb book for beach or book club. As America enters yet another election cycle of name calling and outright lies, this book presents a horrible war in an unforgettable series of exhaustively researched stories. The author shows an almost poetic turn of phrase as in this quote, "the Monitor and the Merrimack, the two ironclads that pinged and doinked each other to a draw", page 174. However, I was left wondering about the reference to a weigh station on the Underground Railroad, page ,2. Whatever did they use for scales? Again, read this book for its historical content. Never forget everyone, even those that couldn't read or write, kept journals and sent letters during the Victorian Age. This book reduces 2 hard drives of hard copy to a fascinating book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Mclaughlin

    A thoroughly enjoyable read of things Civil War Tim Rowland does a nice series of stories, not bogged down with too much detail, but complete in the matters to tell the tales. This was intended to be a weekend read, ended up being a day. Could not put it down. No bad history, no one sided apology....He captures the persona of Dan Sickles and portrays the man so we all get it. Recommend

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    An honorable attempt to bring some snarky humor to our country's most devastating conflict. The author chains together sixteen small vignettes of the Civil War. I didn't really learn anything new from this book, but it wasn't through any fault of the author. I read and review mostly Civil War themed tomes, so I am sure this book would appeal to the neophyte as well as the Civil War bore. A very light, quick read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emily Seier

    Each chapter discusses a different aspect of the war so it’s very easy to get sucked in and just keep reading. I love those kind of unknown stories and that’s what this book is all about. A nice mix of humor and history. A quick and easy read. The only reason I didn’t give 5 stars is because there are some editorial mistakes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Randall F. Miller Jr.

    Interesting This a good book for the casual follower of the civil war, as well as the more seasoned student. It fills in some of the gaps and shows much more of the humanity of the war. The apocryphal stories are interesting and enlightening. A few minor mispellings, but an interesting read,nonetheless. Makes me want to explore some of minor battlefields of the Civil War.

  12. 4 out of 5

    j p emmons

    A great look at a terrible time in American history Rowland has brought to life many people and events that we never learned in school. As a ardent history buff, I am very greatful to him for his honest accounting and very readable tome.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tim Shepard

    Good information We often forget that war has stories to tell other than those of battle. Certainly these missing parts of history while trivial can still have an important message. Well written and researched.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amy Chizen

    Great, fun read For those who enjoy the human side of history, this book is a must read. Some of the blunders are well known, some never revealed. Told in a light hearted manner, non-history buffs will enjoy it too.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Darel Krieger

    Lots of short interesting stories about those who fought in or just survived the civil war.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn Dauer

    Interesting Interesting stories. Words omitted in places; grammatical errors. Although I love anything Civil War, this book didn't really hold my interest.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    When asked about suggestions on historical reads by Alex Lawson.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Henry Sullivan

    A Good Read A well written book worthy of any history lover. A good story made better by crisp and clear facts. Recommended.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris Jarvis

    This was an okay read. Not something that really grabbed me. The stories were interesting.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    Maybe 2.5? I stopped about 1/2 way through because it wasn't what I expected. The stories were too long and not particularly strange or obscure.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I wouldn't call myself a Civil War buff by any means and I still have a LOT to learn about it. But I do find it fascinating and heart breaking all at the same time. As stated in the preface of this book it is NOT a list of or random, lesser known facts. It is, however, a well laid out book of some "coincidences" and connections that unfortunately never made it to the pages of many history textbooks. It's stories like these that make history fascinating... not a bunch of numbers and regiments movi I wouldn't call myself a Civil War buff by any means and I still have a LOT to learn about it. But I do find it fascinating and heart breaking all at the same time. As stated in the preface of this book it is NOT a list of or random, lesser known facts. It is, however, a well laid out book of some "coincidences" and connections that unfortunately never made it to the pages of many history textbooks. It's stories like these that make history fascinating... not a bunch of numbers and regiments moving here and there. My favorite chapters were chapter 5 and the story of Brigadier General Philip Kearny (a one armed military machine!), chapter 12's antics of Dan Sickles (of Gettysburg fame), and chapter 16 details out a little more of Joshua Chamberlain's (20th Maine, Gettysburg) military credits and upstanding character as man. (He is by far a personal favorite in the war for many reasons) Chapter 4 gives a brief look at how many women were fighting in the war disguised as men. The one they chose to focus on in this book was very intriguing! I may buy this in the future when we study the Civil War in depth with the girls. I am not sure if all these facts are well known with Civil War buffs. But if you are generally even interested in the topic I think this is a great book!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    A good read Tim Rowland writes history as though he is sitting at the bar telling stories to a friend. For this type of book, this works very well. There is humor, asides to the reader, and other informal tools of writing used throughout and that makes this oddball assortment of narratives very interesting and entertaining. However, don't mistake me for implying that the book is poorly researched or wanders into fiction. Quite the contrary, Rowland has done his homework. Often the truth is suffic A good read Tim Rowland writes history as though he is sitting at the bar telling stories to a friend. For this type of book, this works very well. There is humor, asides to the reader, and other informal tools of writing used throughout and that makes this oddball assortment of narratives very interesting and entertaining. However, don't mistake me for implying that the book is poorly researched or wanders into fiction. Quite the contrary, Rowland has done his homework. Often the truth is sufficiently bizarre to entertain. If you are like me, you will be left to sit and shake your head in amazement as you read these anecdotes from our bloodiest war.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tim Coleman

    Well done Well done It seems such a shame that history doors not record these little known anecdotes from the bloodiest time in American history. I borrowed this book through Amazon unlimited and got three audible edition with it. I highly recommend this book and the narration. I must also mention that Amazon unlimited is a great easy to read and or listen to more books. I think that I will continue my subscription after the free trial, just after listening to this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rob Roy

    As with any war, strange stories unfold, and this volume tells those tales of the Civil War. Some of them I had read of before, some were new. It is an enjoyable volume of the Civil War casting aside details of battle movements for rather the stories of the men shouldering their rifles. If you are interested in the Civil War, and the men who fought it, an excellent work.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    I'm not a huge Civil War buff, but I was sold on the strange and obscure. Some interesting tidbits, such as the Ohio senator who called Abraham Lincoln "white trash" (lest you think that is a modern term).

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eileen E Cartwright

    Great. Read Great. Read I have read many books about the Civil War but I learned many things I never knew from this one. I especially enjoyed reading about people I knew little or nothing about. The author writes with both humor and compassion.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Gilliam

    Could not put it down Could not put it down I love the civil war. It is refreshing to read such stories. It makes the people come alive. The author did a very good job and I could not put it down. He should do another one. Thank you.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Noah Goats

    This book had some good bits... but on the whole most of these stories were not particularly strange or obscure. Maybe it would live up to its title if it were the first book you ever read about the Civil War.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Charles Hoffman

    Read the reviews, then act swiftly... An outstanding read. Full of obscure but interesting details. If you are a Civil War fan I think you'll like this. If you're not a fan of works about the Civil War...you're on your own. Sorry

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Easily read book with interesting tales of the people that fought the Civil War. Some were true heroes and some were scoundrels.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.