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The story of the Princes in the Tower is one of history's most enduring, poignant and romanticised tales. But were the princes really murdered? David Baldwin presents a fresh new approach to the mystery and reveals, for the first time, the true fate of the younger prince, Richard, Duke of York.On 22 December 1550 an old bricklayer named Richard Plantagenet was buried at The story of the Princes in the Tower is one of history's most enduring, poignant and romanticised tales. But were the princes really murdered? David Baldwin presents a fresh new approach to the mystery and reveals, for the first time, the true fate of the younger prince, Richard, Duke of York.On 22 December 1550 an old bricklayer named Richard Plantagenet was buried at Eastwell in Kent. Unusually for a bricklayer, he had been able to read Latin and, when pressed, he had claimed to be a natural son of King Richard III and to have met him the day before the Battle of Bosworth. Yet had he simply been Richard III's bastard he would have been styled 'of Gloucester' or given the name of his birthplace. Richard III openly acknowledged and provided for his other bastards. Why did he not do the same for Richard Plantagenet? Most tellingly, where is the evidence that Prince Richard actually died? In an original and intriguing scenario, David Baldwin argues that, while some elements of Richard Plantagenet's story may be authentic, it is possible that he dared not reveal his real identity - that he was in fact Richard, Duke of York, the rightful king.David Baldwin has searched contemporary documents to unearth the clues that underpin his theory and has visited all the places associated with Richard Plantagenet. In doing so, he has opened up an entirely new line of investigation and exonerated Richard HI of the greatest of the crimes imputed to him. Dead princes were a potential embarrassment, but a living prince would have been a real danger and a closely guarded secret, not only in Richard's reign but in the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII.


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The story of the Princes in the Tower is one of history's most enduring, poignant and romanticised tales. But were the princes really murdered? David Baldwin presents a fresh new approach to the mystery and reveals, for the first time, the true fate of the younger prince, Richard, Duke of York.On 22 December 1550 an old bricklayer named Richard Plantagenet was buried at The story of the Princes in the Tower is one of history's most enduring, poignant and romanticised tales. But were the princes really murdered? David Baldwin presents a fresh new approach to the mystery and reveals, for the first time, the true fate of the younger prince, Richard, Duke of York.On 22 December 1550 an old bricklayer named Richard Plantagenet was buried at Eastwell in Kent. Unusually for a bricklayer, he had been able to read Latin and, when pressed, he had claimed to be a natural son of King Richard III and to have met him the day before the Battle of Bosworth. Yet had he simply been Richard III's bastard he would have been styled 'of Gloucester' or given the name of his birthplace. Richard III openly acknowledged and provided for his other bastards. Why did he not do the same for Richard Plantagenet? Most tellingly, where is the evidence that Prince Richard actually died? In an original and intriguing scenario, David Baldwin argues that, while some elements of Richard Plantagenet's story may be authentic, it is possible that he dared not reveal his real identity - that he was in fact Richard, Duke of York, the rightful king.David Baldwin has searched contemporary documents to unearth the clues that underpin his theory and has visited all the places associated with Richard Plantagenet. In doing so, he has opened up an entirely new line of investigation and exonerated Richard HI of the greatest of the crimes imputed to him. Dead princes were a potential embarrassment, but a living prince would have been a real danger and a closely guarded secret, not only in Richard's reign but in the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII.

30 review for The Lost Prince: The Survival of Richard of York

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robyn Elliot

    This isn't literary fiction so I don't feel bad about giving this one 2 stars. Mostly, I was disappointed by the premise that if Richard of York had survived, he ended up as a bricklayer. Nothing against bricklayers, I mean what would we do without walls to lean on, but the scenario hardly makes the heart beat a bit faster, does it? And why is it always Richard who generates the interest in the debate on the two Princes; is it a tacit acceptance that Edward died, perhaps, whilst young Richard wa This isn't literary fiction so I don't feel bad about giving this one 2 stars. Mostly, I was disappointed by the premise that if Richard of York had survived, he ended up as a bricklayer. Nothing against bricklayers, I mean what would we do without walls to lean on, but the scenario hardly makes the heart beat a bit faster, does it? And why is it always Richard who generates the interest in the debate on the two Princes; is it a tacit acceptance that Edward died, perhaps, whilst young Richard was spirited away. Goodness knows. The protagonists certainly do, but the snag is they're all dead, and these kinds of books can while away a few fantasy hours, whilst essentially bringing us all back to the place we started -- that we haven't got a clue what happened to the younger prince, or the older one, for that matter. Supposition, imagination and speculation are entertaining components in the mystery, but they hardly solve the mystery. One thought, though; get those bones tested again, they've been hanging around in that urn since Charles II's time and although they were subject to tests in the 1930's, forensics have moved on a bit since then. At the very least, modern tests could establish sex and age; a good start, to the say the least. It's never too late to unravel old mysteries....with facts. I mean, after all, it's amazing what you can turn up in a car-park....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brigitte

    After having read a bunch of historical fiction concerning the War of the Roses, I wanted to follow up with some non-fiction in order to get the real story so to speak. I was interested in the story of the lost princes, Edward V and his brother Prince Richard, who may or may not have been killed in the Tower of London by one of many historical figures. This book tries to show that the younger of the princes, Richard, actually survived and lived out his life as a brick layer. What a horrible read After having read a bunch of historical fiction concerning the War of the Roses, I wanted to follow up with some non-fiction in order to get the real story so to speak. I was interested in the story of the lost princes, Edward V and his brother Prince Richard, who may or may not have been killed in the Tower of London by one of many historical figures. This book tries to show that the younger of the princes, Richard, actually survived and lived out his life as a brick layer. What a horrible read though!! I finally just gave up and skimmed the last chapter trying to find anything resembling proof. Oh well, I know there are other books out there. If you're ever tempted to read up on these poor kids who became pawns in a cut-throat, winner-take-all period of English history...pick up any book but this.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joanie

    David Baldwin's case for the survival of Richard, Duke of York is an interesting and quick read. He raises some interesting points and does provide scenarios as far as who Richard, Duke of York might have been had he continued to live under an assumed identity. I had two main issues with this book. The first being that although he makes clear in the beginning that his book is strictly meant to be speculation as to the prince's survival, there are stretches of text where he writes as though it is David Baldwin's case for the survival of Richard, Duke of York is an interesting and quick read. He raises some interesting points and does provide scenarios as far as who Richard, Duke of York might have been had he continued to live under an assumed identity. I had two main issues with this book. The first being that although he makes clear in the beginning that his book is strictly meant to be speculation as to the prince's survival, there are stretches of text where he writes as though it is fact that Richard, Duke of York did survive well into old age. This includes describing how his family members would have interacted with him, as well as friends and potential enemies. The other issue was that I felt Mr. Baldwin had to stretch pretty far to make his case in certain areas to the point that some arguments didn't seem plausible. Like everyone else, I do not know what did or didn't happen to either of the Princes in the Tower, but it seems highly unlikely that Henry VII would have knowingly allowed someone with a greater claim to the throne to live. It seems even more unlikely that he would have allowed several other people to be aware of it without silencing them or Richard for that matter, and if so many people allegedly knew, that someone would not have spilled the beans. Would Henry VII have not made either of his sons aware either? His argument that people would have hardly turned out for a 12-year boy king also doesn't hold water. While Richard III was potentially bolstered by the idea that people weary of war were not eager to see a child on the throne, Henry VII's claim was far more tenuous than Richard III's claim. It is quite likely that people would have turned out for one of Edward IV's sons against Henry VII. The Lambert Simnel affair and subsequent situation with Perkin Warbeck (although Warbeck was older) would not have happened otherwise. Again, I think this book brings up some intriguing suggestions, but it does stretch the limits of plausibility on more than one occasion. There are other books I've read that I feel do a better job of explaining and arguing the possibilities of what might have happened to the princes, but for fans of this chapter in English history, Mr. Baldwin's book does provide some interesting food for thought.

  4. 5 out of 5

    S.C. Skillman

    A highly-literate and clearly high-born man named Richard of Eastwell, working as a bricklayer, brought up and nurtured in St John's Abbey at Colchester, told a story that he was the illegitimate son of Richard III (thus posing no threat to the Tudor kings). Henry VII had special concerns about Colchester during the early years of his reign; a number of people very significant to the Princes in the Tower made unnecessary visits to Colchester; and a tomb exists dedicated to Richard Plantagenet, t A highly-literate and clearly high-born man named Richard of Eastwell, working as a bricklayer, brought up and nurtured in St John's Abbey at Colchester, told a story that he was the illegitimate son of Richard III (thus posing no threat to the Tudor kings). Henry VII had special concerns about Colchester during the early years of his reign; a number of people very significant to the Princes in the Tower made unnecessary visits to Colchester; and a tomb exists dedicated to Richard Plantagenet, the name by which Richard of Eastwell became known - consistent with his own claims of being Richard III's bastard. These and many other observations and facts are skilfully stitched together by David Baldwin to support his theory that Prince Richard, the younger of the Princes in the Tower, survived and lived to a good age, choosing a humble livelihood, and claiming to be Richard III's illegitimate son in order to protect himself; and this was well known by many close to him and by the Tudor kings; and kept as a dangerous secret. History has focussed on the story of the Princes' murder by Richard III. But is the truth more complex than that? Was Richard III innocent of this particular crime? Do David Baldwin's marshalled facts and skilful arguments consititute proof? We still remain unsure. But what a fascinating book this is. I thoroughly enjoyed following the way Baldwin makes his argument, based on such evidence as how certain people would have behaved, given what is known about them; what would have been in their interest; and how certain individuals may have successfully propagated a fiction which we believe to this day. History is of course constantly being revised, according to new evidence brought forward during the researches of historians. And other historians have advanced alternative theories about the Princes in the Tower, and what happened to them, which must be considered alongside David Baldwin's. But when can something be considered the truth? Only when incontrovertable facts and documents are brought forward; only when bones are unearthed and DNA tests carried out on them, can we reach near certainty. Meanwhile we must always consider how we may still be influenced by Tudor propaganda; which may account for the current huge interest in history books and novels about their dynasty.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Randy Ladenheim-Gil

    This catches me between two of my biggest interests: historic true crime and royal genealogy. I've read a number of books about "the princes in the Tower" and have others in my TBR stack, and I'm glad I took the time to read this one. I appreciated the fact that Baldwin didn't go back through the entire War of the Roses to puff up his page count as many, many writers do--this is a relatively short book--and it offered what may be an answer to the mystery, though I probably wouldn't take his theo This catches me between two of my biggest interests: historic true crime and royal genealogy. I've read a number of books about "the princes in the Tower" and have others in my TBR stack, and I'm glad I took the time to read this one. I appreciated the fact that Baldwin didn't go back through the entire War of the Roses to puff up his page count as many, many writers do--this is a relatively short book--and it offered what may be an answer to the mystery, though I probably wouldn't take his theory nearly as seriously as he does. Will we ever have the real answer? I doubt it. But I wonder why Baldwin takes so easily the notion that Edward V died of natural causes. I can't remember reading about him being ill at any point in his young life. And if his supposition is that a great many people had pieces of the puzzle at the very least, I can't believe they all somehow agreed to keep the truth so very quiet.

  6. 4 out of 5

    R G G Currie

    It's all circumstantial evidence but it may be that Richard Grey, the bricklayer of Colchester, was actually Prince Richard, the second son of King Edward IV of Britian - one of the Princes in the Tower. It's all circumstantial evidence but it may be that Richard Grey, the bricklayer of Colchester, was actually Prince Richard, the second son of King Edward IV of Britian - one of the Princes in the Tower.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Krystina

    The book blurb implied that there was new evidence on the lost princes that the writer would tell us about but in reality, it was general speculation and I felt the book was a bit vague. It explored various people related to the princes in more detail than it does the princes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Debra Cook

    Tried to read but was confusing and not straight forward. Didn't finish. Tried to read but was confusing and not straight forward. Didn't finish.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    It was a interesting theory

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Somewhat long-winded... and the number of characters with the same name is mind-boggling - and differences not always clearly explained.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    Trying to get back into the habit of reviewing the books I read. Last night, I finished "The Lost Prince: The Survival of Richard of York" -- one of the so-called Princes in the Tower -- by David Baldwin. I previously read Baldwin's biography of Richard III, and found him to be fair and even handed when it came to writing about this controversial monarch. These days, there seem to be two camps when it comes to R3 -- either he was the vilest, most evil man to have ever worn a crown, or he was a s Trying to get back into the habit of reviewing the books I read. Last night, I finished "The Lost Prince: The Survival of Richard of York" -- one of the so-called Princes in the Tower -- by David Baldwin. I previously read Baldwin's biography of Richard III, and found him to be fair and even handed when it came to writing about this controversial monarch. These days, there seem to be two camps when it comes to R3 -- either he was the vilest, most evil man to have ever worn a crown, or he was a saint. I don't buy into either, but believe him to have been a man of his times, a man with good qualities but one who could also be ruthless when he deemed it necessary. But on to this book... No one knows what really happened to the "Princes in the Tower." Did they die, and if so, was it from natural causes (illness) or were they murdered (by a variety of suspects). Did one or both survive, and if so, what happened to them? This book offers one historian's theory as to what happened. The author, David Baldwin, doesn't claim to have the final answer to the question as to whether Richard of York, the younger of the two boys, survived, but does believe that there is a strong possibility that he did and lived out his life as Richard of Eastwick. An interesting theory, and as good as any other floating about out there.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kizzia

    The theory put forward in this book is reliant on vast amounts of speculation. That said it is an interesting theory and certainly no worse than many of the others that have been published over the years. However the author's style did not gel with me at all, so I couldn't rate it at 5, and the fact that some of the information was presented in a rather disjointed manner knocked another star off for me. The theory put forward in this book is reliant on vast amounts of speculation. That said it is an interesting theory and certainly no worse than many of the others that have been published over the years. However the author's style did not gel with me at all, so I couldn't rate it at 5, and the fact that some of the information was presented in a rather disjointed manner knocked another star off for me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    Have been interested in the Princes in the Tower for years and was intrigued by the concept. However the book is very disappointing and is a bit of a hybrid of fact/assumption. A lot of attributing of emotions which is out of place. The first section prior to the disappearance from the Tower is ok but the next portion is not convincing .

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ernestina

    The theory could be quite interesting, I like mysteries, but I was disappointed from the absence of proofs. So in the end the book remains halfway between history and historical fiction, reaching neither one nor the other.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gerald

    A whim and a fantasy best describe this book. Interesting possibility, but not convincing enoough in its research or theory.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Poirier

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paula

  18. 4 out of 5

    Noelene St Vincent

  19. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  20. 5 out of 5

    Éowyn

  21. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Acuna

  22. 4 out of 5

    Louise

  23. 5 out of 5

    patricia chalmers

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lawrence Lewis

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jaffareadstoo

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eggy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kitty Davis

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