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In "The Africa Cookbook, " culinary historian and cookbook author Jessica B. Harris takes you on a tour of the Motherland, exploring the extraordinary diversity of the cuisines of the continent."The Africa Cookbook" features more than 200 traditional and contemporary recipes collected from home kitchens across Africa, including the familiar couscous of Morocco, the savory In "The Africa Cookbook, " culinary historian and cookbook author Jessica B. Harris takes you on a tour of the Motherland, exploring the extraordinary diversity of the cuisines of the continent."The Africa Cookbook" features more than 200 traditional and contemporary recipes collected from home kitchens across Africa, including the familiar couscous of Morocco, the savory stews of the eastern grasslands, and the curries and chutneys of the Swahili coasts. From the sophisticated cuisine of Senegal to the creolized food of Mauritius and the Seychelles to the Afrikaner barbecues of South Africa, Harris presents the food of the continent and paints unforgettable portraits of the people who shared their culinary heritage with her. Illustrated with archival postcards from the author's collection, "The Africa Cookbook" celebrates countries whose contributions to the way we eat today have been too long ignored. Now home cooks can sample Potatoes with Mint Leaves and Garlic from Algeria or Senegal's classic Theibou Dienn. Spicy fried oysters with peanut sauce from Togo wakes up the palate, while Mango Cream from Cameroon cools the fire. Carrot Sambal from South Africa makes a piquant side dish, while Kedjenou (chicken stewed with tomato, onions, chile, garlic, and ginger) from C&3244;te d'Ivoire makes an intriguing main course. A special section of menus using recipes from the book complete with suggestions for appropriate decor and music, makes it easy to plan a variety of African feasts. Harris also includes a glossary of ingredients and utensils, a selection of mail-order sources, and a list of more good reading on African foods.


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In "The Africa Cookbook, " culinary historian and cookbook author Jessica B. Harris takes you on a tour of the Motherland, exploring the extraordinary diversity of the cuisines of the continent."The Africa Cookbook" features more than 200 traditional and contemporary recipes collected from home kitchens across Africa, including the familiar couscous of Morocco, the savory In "The Africa Cookbook, " culinary historian and cookbook author Jessica B. Harris takes you on a tour of the Motherland, exploring the extraordinary diversity of the cuisines of the continent."The Africa Cookbook" features more than 200 traditional and contemporary recipes collected from home kitchens across Africa, including the familiar couscous of Morocco, the savory stews of the eastern grasslands, and the curries and chutneys of the Swahili coasts. From the sophisticated cuisine of Senegal to the creolized food of Mauritius and the Seychelles to the Afrikaner barbecues of South Africa, Harris presents the food of the continent and paints unforgettable portraits of the people who shared their culinary heritage with her. Illustrated with archival postcards from the author's collection, "The Africa Cookbook" celebrates countries whose contributions to the way we eat today have been too long ignored. Now home cooks can sample Potatoes with Mint Leaves and Garlic from Algeria or Senegal's classic Theibou Dienn. Spicy fried oysters with peanut sauce from Togo wakes up the palate, while Mango Cream from Cameroon cools the fire. Carrot Sambal from South Africa makes a piquant side dish, while Kedjenou (chicken stewed with tomato, onions, chile, garlic, and ginger) from C&3244;te d'Ivoire makes an intriguing main course. A special section of menus using recipes from the book complete with suggestions for appropriate decor and music, makes it easy to plan a variety of African feasts. Harris also includes a glossary of ingredients and utensils, a selection of mail-order sources, and a list of more good reading on African foods.

30 review for The Africa Cookbook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Redsteve

    After skimming this a few years ago, I finally got around to thoroughly re-reading it. Generally good, although I admit that I prefer the North African (Moroccan, Egyptian, Tunisian) and Ethiopian dishes. An interesting thing that I noticed is that once you get to the foods of Sub-Saharan Africa, the recipes either seem to be extremely simple (like 3-6 ingredients) or intensely complicated (I actually had to do a significant amount of hunting just to make the spice mix for the Nigerian Peppersou After skimming this a few years ago, I finally got around to thoroughly re-reading it. Generally good, although I admit that I prefer the North African (Moroccan, Egyptian, Tunisian) and Ethiopian dishes. An interesting thing that I noticed is that once you get to the foods of Sub-Saharan Africa, the recipes either seem to be extremely simple (like 3-6 ingredients) or intensely complicated (I actually had to do a significant amount of hunting just to make the spice mix for the Nigerian Peppersoup (Nwa Nwa) – and I have an extensive (and fairly exotic) spice cabinet. Sadly, I also have to admit that some of the primary ingredients in many of the Subsaharan dishes (okra, yam,. cassava, goat) are low on my list of favorite foods.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Cleaves

    No photos is always a no go for me when it comes to recipes. The recipes did not sound tasty, but more than that there was a surfeit of page occupying add this to that and you’ll have a new dish. No you won’t. It will just be a variant of what came before. Disappointing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Fascinating, if not necessarily practical. Many of the recipes do use readily available ingredients, but equally many call for unfamiliar, hard-to-find greens and palm oil. I loved reading it, with the background, varying cultures, and Ms. Harris' personal stories, but I rarely use it. Fascinating, if not necessarily practical. Many of the recipes do use readily available ingredients, but equally many call for unfamiliar, hard-to-find greens and palm oil. I loved reading it, with the background, varying cultures, and Ms. Harris' personal stories, but I rarely use it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Teji

    Not just a cookbook but rather a mixture of history, culture, travel stories, and, yes, recipes. The recipes are from all of parts Africa and include notes about how the recipes have influenced dishes in other parts of the African diaspora. This was published in 1998 and it is interesting to note that (while a few ingredients are still rare) many of the ingredients that were once difficult, necessitating notes about how to mail order, are increasingly available in larger grocery stores. I do wis Not just a cookbook but rather a mixture of history, culture, travel stories, and, yes, recipes. The recipes are from all of parts Africa and include notes about how the recipes have influenced dishes in other parts of the African diaspora. This was published in 1998 and it is interesting to note that (while a few ingredients are still rare) many of the ingredients that were once difficult, necessitating notes about how to mail order, are increasingly available in larger grocery stores. I do wish that she had listed alternate names for some of the harder to find ingredients since many are now available-- just not under the name that she used. Quotes (view spoiler)[ “The dinner begins with a ewer of water passed by the daughter of the family so that guests can wash their hands in perfumed water. This is only natural, as forks and spoons will not appear. Hands and pieces of bread will be the ‘cutlery.’ (Right hand only, please! Don’t ask why).” p25 “The African continent has long been dubbed the Dark Continent. Needless to say, this appellation is incorrect. More appropriately, the landmass where man originated should be baptized the ‘Continent About Which We Are in the Dark.’ “ p46 "There are two main types of palm oil. The more familiar red palm oil brings its distinctive taste and hue…This red palm oil has even crossed the Atlantic to become one of the hallmarks of the cooking of Bahia, Brazil. The less familiar palm kernel oil is light tan and has an almost molasses-sweet smell. A seasoned version of the red type, called zomi, is also occasionally available…Those who are concerned about health issues involving eating of excessive saturated fats can moderate their palm oil intake by diminishing the amount of palm oil used and replacing it with another vegetable oil." p66 “I was also told that proper young ladies would never think of chewing kola and that they would never, under any circumstances, accept kola from someone who was not a close friend of the family. Well, all the admonitions were enough to get me going…I took a small nibble…They were just bitter. A second nibble confirmed that kola addiction was not in my future. Now I just smile and nod when listing to my friends warn their daughters of the evils of kola. They should just let them try some: I’ll take odds they’ll never want any more.” p112 “Senegalese filmmaker Ousmane Sembene’s film Emitai portrays the life of the rice growers of the Casamance region of Senegal during the war. In it, the viewer is taken into the rice fields and watches as the grain, which is considered sacred by the people of the region, is planted and harvested. I’ve always felt that this film, with its theme of the corruption of pastoral society by the forces of war and modernization, is a microcosm of what’s happening to much of the traditional food and the traditional foodways of the continent…North, south, east, and west growing numbers of people are looking to Europe and America for dietary guidance rather than under their own noses. Roadrunner chickens are being replaced by plump cellophane-wrapped poulets morgues (morgue chickens), as they are called. Fresh fruit juices and infusions are replaced by the sugars and empty calories of soft drinks, and meat is taking over the plate as a sign of affluence…Emitai and moments from varying films on the continents—as well as recent works by African dietitians, nutritionists, and scholars—remind me that we are what we eat, and if we change what we eat, we may chance who we are…” p289 “…the best way to eat a ripe mango is naked and in the bathtub.” (hide spoiler)]

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ashani

    Its Juneteenth and this book bombarded me: first the wrong size of the African continent(Us is 32% of compared to African continent) and the other facts or the actual truth left behind world without knowing. Recipes are too turned away from knowing. So sad.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    This will be a great reference for the future but I could have really used some inspiring photos of the dishes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    I would give it more stars... because I love this cookbook... But we really only use one or two recipes from it lol.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marc

  11. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  12. 4 out of 5

    ehme

  13. 5 out of 5

    AfricaAdventureConsultants

  14. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne O.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Iman

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lea

  17. 4 out of 5

    NarcissusTea

  18. 5 out of 5

    Randi Myers

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessi

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tambra

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tonya

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Stumvoll

  23. 5 out of 5

    chris Massamba

  24. 5 out of 5

    Janne Huovilainen

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ama

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laretta

  28. 5 out of 5

    Annette S

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Grant

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lana

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